ABACUS entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ABACUS
sa   MODEL & MINIATURE ABACUS
xx   CALCULATOR

Abacus-style wall ornament made from beads, welding rod, and pine. Estimated cost: $16.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1980 (v.58#7) pg. 98, 126

How to construct and use an abacus.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1966 (v.56#10) pg. 72

Abacus neckerchief slide features beads that actually move.
BOYS' LIFE Aug 1987 (v.77#8) pg. 64

Pattern for making an abacus.
BOYS' LIFE Mar 1989 (v.79#3) pg. 45

Using an abacus (bead counter).
LAPIDARY JOURNAL Oct 1994 (v.48#7) pg. 73

Single-row abacus made from scrap wood sits at the end of a pool to serve as a lap counter.
SUNSET Jun 1980 (v.164#6) pg. 134

ABRASIVE CUTOFF MACHINE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ABRASIVE CUTOFF MACHINE
x   CUTOFF MACHINE (ABRASIVE)
xx   POWER TOOL
xx   SAW

Portable electric cut-off saws. Versatile remodeling tools that cut concrete, masonry, metal and stone. What is available and tips on their use and maintenance.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #62 Aug-Sep 1990 pg. 80
Correction FINE HOMEBUILDING #64 Dec 1990-Jan 1991 pg. 12

Low cost swing cutoff for metal.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1963 (v.120#3) pg. 179

Portable abrasive cutoff machine. Consists of a 1-hp motor, arbor, and a hinged pivot arm.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1967 (v.127#2) pg. 190

A pivoting bracket allows a portable circular saw to be used as an abrasive cutoff machine. Bracket fastens to a vise which grips the work being cut.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1967 (v.128#5) pg. 184

Make an abrasive cutoff machine from a 1/4 hp motor, a 12"x12" steel base mounted on casters, and a set of shafts and pillow blocks used as mandrels for buffing.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1971 (v.136#3) pg. 166

A portable circular saw, equipped with a metal cutting blade, and installed in this special jig, becomes a cutoff machine for handling metal cutting. Jig provides a means of pivoting the saw and protecting the operator from flying sparks. You will be able to cut through metal rods, pipe, angle iron and hardened steel.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1974 (v.142#5) pg. 150

Tip: Friction-cut stainless steel on a table saw using an old, dull fine-tooth plywood blade.
SMALL BOAT JOURNAL #46 Dec 1985-Jan 1986 pg. 68

Homemade grinding or abrasive cutoff disk is made by applying rock tumbling grit to fiberglass using epoxy cement. The resulting disk is very thin and flexible. Tips on using this disk to cut Plexiglas are included.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1985 (v.34#9) pg. 68

Cutting metal (iron or steel) using a friction-cutting circular saw blade which burns its way through metal faster than a toothed blade can cut.
WORKBENCH Nov-Dec 1969 (v.25#6) pg. 54

Tips on selecting and using hacksaws and other metal sawing tools.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1980 (v.36#4) pg. 45

ABRASIVE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ABRASIVE
sa   GRINDING WHEEL & STONE
sa   SANDPAPER
sa   STEEL WOOL

A description of using Micro-Mesh abrasive in grits ranging from 1500 to 12,000 as a wood finishing material.
AMERICAN WOODTURNER Dec 1991 (v.6#4) pg. 27

True grit. Simple techniques for improving chisels, planes, and sharpening stones with abrasives. Using lapping to polish a plane blade or chisel, flatten a plane's sole, true a whetstone, etc.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Mar 1987 (v.10#6) pg. 61

Abrasive finishing of faceplate turnings. Some tips.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jun 1987 (v.10#9) pg. 14

Tips on using polyester scrubbing material (such as 3M's Scotch Brite) for wood removal and for smoothing surfaces. Ideal for use when woodcarving using a rotary tool or flexible shaft.
CHIP CHATS May-Jun 1994 (v.41#3) pg. 66

Time to sharpen. A summary of the three basic categories of abrasive compounds and when to use each one.
CHIP CHATS Jan-Feb 1997 (v.44#1) pg. 77

Time to sharpen. A guide to two rouges for strop and wheel and the subtle differences between them.
CHIP CHATS Mar-Apr 1997 (v.44#2) pg. 73

Tip on selecting abrasives for rubbing out a finish.
FINE WOODWORKING #77 Jul-Aug 1989 pg. 22
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #79 Nov-Dec 1989 pg. 10

Tip on using 3M Scotch-Brite fine-grade pads in place of steel wool.
FINE WOODWORKING #80 Jan-Feb 1990 pg. 4

Abrasives used in plastic model making. Looks at files, emery boards, sandpaper, polishing sticks and polishing compounds.
IPMS/USA JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1999 (v.11#3) pg. 25

Tip: Make your own small rubberized abrasive wheels from pencil erasers.
JEWELRY MAKING, GEMS & MINERALS #572 Jul 1985 pg. 26

Advice on the use of 3M Scotch-Brite abrasive pads on aluminum.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1999 (v.21#9) pg. 22

Tip: Wire screening can substitute for rough sandpaper on turned wooden bowls or spindles.
NATIONAL CARVERS REVIEW Fall 1978 (v.9#3) pg. 32

Short glossary of abrasives and abrasive terms.
NATIONAL CARVERS REVIEW Spring 1980 (v.11#1) pg. 30

How to use wet abrasives.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1988 (v.165#12) pg. 64

Tips on selecting and using abrasive pads.
SHOPNOTES #8 Mar 1993 (v.2) pg. 30

Tip on using a foam-bottomed push block to get even pressure on an abrasive pad when rubbing out a finish.
SHOPNOTES #13 Jan 1994 (v.3) pg. 29

Homemade grinding or abrasive cutoff disk is made by applying rock tumbling grit to fiberglass using epoxy cement. The resulting disk is very thin and flexible. Tips on using this disk to cut Plexiglas are included.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1985 (v.34#9) pg. 68

Sanding and abrading tips for both wood and metal. Tips on selecting the abrasive (sandpaper, pads, cut-off discs, rotary files, pumice), value of a disc sander, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1989 (v.38#10) pg. 34

What's my abrasive? A table compares the grit number, diameter in thousandths of an inch, and the micron measurement of abrasives from eight different companies.
TELESCOPE MAKING #2 Winter 1978 pg. 9

Tip on applying and rubbing abrasives such as pumice and rottenstone.
WOOD MAGAZINE #2 Nov-Dec 1984 (v.1#2) pg. 25

Know your woodworking abrasives. Looks at coated abrasives, steel wool, finishing pads, pumice, rottenstone, etc.
WOOD MAGAZINE #20 Dec 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 50

Tip on using nylon-pad pan scourers as rotating abrasive discs to sand wood.
WOODCARVING #40 Mar-Apr 1998 pg. 64

ACCELEROMETER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ACCELEROMETER
x   G METER
xx   GRAVITY

Determine "g" forces generated by your car with this portable, digital acceleration and deceleration measurement system.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Fall 1995 pg. 19

Automotive performance tester. Build an electronic accelerometer to measure 0-60-mph acceleration time, g-force, etc.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jan 1998 (v.69#1) pg. 33

SenSym's SXL series of monolithic accelerometers are reviewed.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1988 (v.5#10) pg. 64

Simple accelerometer measures positive or negative G force. Est. cost: $13.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1968 (v.29#3) pg. 29

Build the "G" machine. Determine the gravitational forces generated by your car with this portable, digital system to measure acceleration or deceleration.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 46
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1995 (v.12#10) pg. 4

An accelerometer (G-meter) for the dashboard of your car uses liquid to show acceleration and lateral forces acting on the car. Helps determine performance.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1972 (v.137#2) pg. 156

ADHESIVE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ADHESIVE
sa   ADHESIVE APPLICATOR
sa   ADHESIVE REMOVAL
sa   ADHESIVE STORAGE
sa   CASEIN GLUE
sa   CAULKING & WEATHERSTRIPPING
sa   CONTACT CEMENT
sa   CYANOACRYLATE GLUE
sa   EPOXY
sa   ETHYLENE VINYL ACETATE (EVA) GLUE
sa   FISH GLUE
sa   HIDE GLUE
sa   HOT-MELT GLUE
sa   PASTE
sa   POLYURETHANE GLUE
sa   POLYVINYL ACETATE (PVA) GLUE
sa   RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ADHESIVE
sa   UREA RESIN GLUE
x   CEMENT (GLUE)
x   GLUE

Appreciating adhesives. Useful and practical article on model making adhesives is reprinted from an Australian publication.
AERO MODELLER #673 Feb 1992 (v.57) pg. 26

Get stuck in. A brief look at the different types of adhesives used on model aircraft.
AERO MODELLER #705 Oct 1994 (v.59) pg. 44

Brief guide to the various adhesives used in aircraft model making.
AERO MODELLER #749 May 7 1998 (v.63) pg. 12

Tips on when you can use a dye or stain before gluing up (assembling) wood components.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER Mar-Apr 1989 (v.5#2) pg. 6

Woodworking glues. Choosing the right one. Looks at PVA glues, plastic resin glue, epoxy, hide glue, etc.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER Sep-Oct 1989 (v.5#5) pg. 46
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER Nov-Dec 1989 (v.5#6) pg. 4

Tip describes how to test the strength of glue before using it on a large assembly.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #32 May-Jun 1993 pg. 18

A guide to glues. An explanation of how glues work, the properties of woodworking glues, their applications and some cautions. Tips on ways to get good glue joints.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #34 Sep-Oct 1993 pg. 26
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER #35 Nov-Dec 1993 pg. 8

Gluing up. Taking the hassle out of this sticky job. Choosing the correct glue, glue-up tools (glue spreaders, rules, clamps, bench, ...), dry run, gluing, clamping, and cleaning up.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #44 Apr 1995 pg. 37
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER #47 Oct 1995 pg. 6

Tip describes how to make a large heat box for curing a glued-up assembly in a cold workshop.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #59 Jun 1997 pg. 32

Glue and clamps. A dry run is the key to hassle-free glue-up.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #73 Jun 1999 pg. 78

Simple test to check wood's ability to absorb glue.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #96 Oct 2002 pg. 14

Advice on adhesives to use for attaching artwork on paper to a canvas.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1991 (v.8#7) pg. 78

How to choose the right adhesive. Chart shows type of material to be bonded and which adhesives will do the job.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1976 (v.54#4) pg. J14 (128+)

A guide to basic adhesives.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1980 (v.58#2) pg. 83

Tip: Prevent glue from oozing out from a joint onto the "good" surface by cutting a shallow slot to absorb any excess glue.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1983 (v.61#3) pg. 48

Glue-ups without screwups. A lesson in reducing woodworking frustration.
CANADIAN HOME WORKSHOP Jun 2000 (v.23#8) pg. 22

Advice on adhesives. Brief tips on choosing the proper adhesive for the job.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jan 1980 (v.3#4) pg. 46

List of 59 different adhesives from 5 different manufacturers, plus a chart of when to use each type of glue.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jul 1981 (v.4#10) pg. 34

Tips on gluing up teak and other oily woods.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Dec 1985 (v.9#3) pg. 6

Choosing adhesives. Part 1.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Apr 1987 (v.10#7) pg. 17

Choosing adhesives. Part 2.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP May 1987 (v.10#8) pg. 18

High-tech metal repair. Tips on using anaerobic adhesives (threadlockers), repairing damaged threads, and fixing holes in metals, ceramics, wood, etc.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jun 1987 (v.10#9) pg. 16

Tips on repairing broken glass and crystal Christmas tree ornaments using adhesives.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Dec 1987 (v.11#3) pg. 12

Workshop glue down. Guide to selecting and using five basic workshop adhesives.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Dec 1990 (v.14#3) pg. 14

Tapping glues. A summary of woodworking glues.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Sep 1993 (v.16#12) pg. 15

Advice on selecting the safest type of adhesive to use when making a large cutting block.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jan 1997 (v.20#4) pg. 19

An overview of the various types of glue, what they're made of, and what they do.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Feb 1998 (v.21#5) pg. 42

Buyer's guide to craft glues and their important characteristics.
CRAFTS Apr 1996 (v.19#4) pg. 30

A glossary of glues that are used in crafts. Includes chemical composition and brand names of various glues.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jun 1977 (v.8#5) pg. 13

Tip on selecting an approved glue for use on wooden aircraft.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 3

Tip on using expanding foam as an adhesive to attach foam to foam, metal, glass, etc.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 11

Fix-it-quick guide to glues. Includes a cross-reference chart telling which glue to use depending upon the materials to be fastened together.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 21 1983 (v.96#9) pg. 119

What's new in glue. A guide to selecting the right glue for any job.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #95 Dec 1966 (v.16#6) pg. 33

A look at modern glues and how to pick the right one for a job. Includes lengthy chart by manufacturer, adhesive type and uses.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #189 Apr 1978 (v.28#4) pg. 64

How to build stronger and neater with modern construction adhesives. How to insulate block walls, install subflooring, build a deck, etc. using adhesives.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #249 May-Jun 1984 (v.34#5) pg. 75

Tip: Increase surface area of a glue joint by pressing "craters" into the surface using a piece of coarse garnet paper and a mallet.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #270 Jul-Aug 1986 (v.36#6) pg. 96

Tip: Store tubes of cement, caulk, etc. by hanging them up using this idea.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #285 Jan 1988 (v.38#1) pg. 100

How to attach wood to concrete. Looks at nails, predrilled fasteners, expansion fasteners, power fasteners, and glue.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #297 Apr 1989 (v.39#4) pg. 53

Creating glue joints that last. A guide to the strengths and weaknesses of the various wood glues. Five steps to a strong wood joint.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #341 Sep 1993 (v.43#8) pg. 26

Tip on using PVC cement to repair rubber, vinyl or plastic items.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #352 Oct 1994 (v.44#9) pg. 50

The seven deadly sins of gluing wood. (1) Gluing unsound surfaces. (2) Relying on sloppy-fitting joints. (3) Improper glue spreading. (4) Improper clamping pressure. (5) Using the wrong glue. (6) Glue-staining the wood. (7) Relying on end grain. Includes a buyer's guide to five common wood glues.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #378 May 1997 (v.47#5) pg. 63

Construction adhesives. Versatile gap-filling glues (mastics) designed to stick on the job site. What is available and tips on their use.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #58 Feb-Mar 1990 pg. 72

Adhesive formula for attaching plaster casts to drywall and wood.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #60 Apr-May 1990 pg. 16

Tip on using the heat from an automotive engine to warm tubes of caulking or adhesive during the winter.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #60 Apr-May 1990 pg. 28

Builders' adhesives. A thumbnail guide to job-site bonding.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #65 Feb-Mar 1991 pg. 40

How to darken the glue lines of polyvinyl and aliphatic glues, especially when used on dark woods.
FINE WOODWORKING #6 Spring 1977 pg. 9

Glues and gluing. A look at woodworking adhesives of various kinds, including application, clamping, and shelf life.
FINE WOODWORKING #7 Summer 1977 pg. 28

Tips on adhesives to use when inlaying brass strips into walnut.
FINE WOODWORKING #8 Fall 1977 pg. 32

Tip: How to prepare oily woods like lignum vitae and cocobolo to accept adhesives.
FINE WOODWORKING #8 Fall 1977 pg. 34

Tip: Best way to edge glue rosewood.
FINE WOODWORKING #10 Spring 1978 pg. 29

Tips on gluing rosewood with yellow glue.
FINE WOODWORKING #12 Sep 1978 pg. 10

Tip: Do not use acrylic latex contact cement to glue wood veneer.
FINE WOODWORKING #24 Sep-Oct 1980 pg. 32

What are the effects of time, cold, moisture and shock on various common wood glues.
FINE WOODWORKING #28 May-Jun 1981 pg. 24

Gluing up. How to get a strong, square assembly when using bar clamps to do edge gluing, leg/rail assemblies, frame gluing, etc.
FINE WOODWORKING #31 Nov-Dec 1981 pg. 86

Cold hide glue formula for furniture repair work.
FINE WOODWORKING #34 May-Jun 1982 pg. 6

Which glue do you use? Part 1. General woodworking glues.
FINE WOODWORKING #43 Nov-Dec 1983 pg. 62
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #45 Mar-Apr 1984 pg. 6

A look at why wood glue joints fail.
FINE WOODWORKING #43 Nov-Dec 1983 pg. 65

Glues for woodworking. Part 2. Synthetic glues, including epoxy resins, polyester resins, cranoacrylate glues, hot-melt glues, and contact cements.
FINE WOODWORKING #44 Jan-Feb 1984 pg. 48
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #46 May-Jun 1984 pg. 6

Tip on gluing exotic woods which have a high resin and oil content (such as rosewood and ebony).
FINE WOODWORKING #45 Mar-Apr 1984 pg. 16

Tips on the correct adhesives to use in laminated furniture to prevent "telegraphing" of gluelines.
FINE WOODWORKING #46 May-Jun 1984 pg. 16

Tips on keeping hide glue from spoiling.
FINE WOODWORKING #46 May-Jun 1984 pg. 18
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #48 Sep-Oct 1984 pg. 4

Tips on glues for kitchen utensils, cutting boards, etc.
FINE WOODWORKING #50 Jan-Feb 1985 pg. 18

Tip: Use a foam picnic cooler equipped with a 15-watt light bulb to keep glue and finishes from freezing when stored in an unheated building.
FINE WOODWORKING #52 May-Jun 1985 pg. 8

Visit to a glue factory reveals the versatility of hide glue. Includes tips on using hide glue in woodworking.
FINE WOODWORKING #57 Mar-Apr 1986 pg. 66
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #59 Jul-Aug 1986 pg. 6

Tips on glue to use on teak and other oily woods.
FINE WOODWORKING #61 Nov-Dec 1986 pg. 12

Tips on determining if moisture is causing joint seepage.
FINE WOODWORKING #62 Jan-Feb 1987 pg. 18

Tip on repairing a fine crack in a wooden cup using cyanoacrylate glue.
FINE WOODWORKING #63 Mar-Apr 1987 pg. 14
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #65 Jul-Aug 1987 pg. 4

Tips for filling and repairing hairline cracks in wood projects.
FINE WOODWORKING #67 Nov-Dec 1987 pg. 10

Tips on selecting a glue for chairmaking.
FINE WOODWORKING #70 May-Jun 1988 pg. 12
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #71 Jul-Aug 1988 pg. 6

Shallow sawkerfs trap excess glue and prevent squeeze-out.
FINE WOODWORKING #73 Nov-Dec 1988 pg. 8

Tips on using and applying yellow glue and epoxy to minimize problems caused by heavy stress and wood movement.
FINE WOODWORKING #74 Jan-Feb 1989 pg. 12

Tip: Use sheet adhesive sold in fabric stores to attach wood veneer.
FINE WOODWORKING #75 Mar-Apr 1989 pg. 10

Correct clamping time for glue-joints discussed.
FINE WOODWORKING #76 May-Jun 1989 pg. 16

Tip on lengthening the working time of two-part glues.
FINE WOODWORKING #80 Jan-Feb 1990 pg. 14

Chemical hazards of woodworking. What you don't know can hurt you. Includes charts of hazardous chemicals used in woodworking adhesives and finishes.
FINE WOODWORKING #80 Jan-Feb 1990 pg. 58
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #83 Jul-Aug 1990 pg. 4

Adhesives for woodworking. An overview of all the major types of wood glue.
FINE WOODWORKING #96 Sep-Oct 1992 pg. 44
Correction FINE WOODWORKING #97 Nov-Dec 1992 pg. 8
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #98 Jan-Feb 1993 pg. 6
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #102 Sep-Oct 1993 pg. 32 (Joint disassembly)
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #104 Jan-Feb 1994 pg. 8 (Epoxy/resin joint disassembly)

Tip on using an electric blanket over a project (during the winter) to facilitate proper setting of glue.
FINE WOODWORKING #113 Jul-Aug 1995 pg. 22

A working guide to glues. Looks at natural glues, nonreactive synthetic glues, and reactive synthetic glues.
FINE WOODWORKING #134 Jan-Feb 1999 pg. 60

Choosing adhesives for laminated-wood cutting boards.
FINE WOODWORKING #135 Mar-Apr 1999 pg. 96

A use test on "Hot Stuff", a cyanocrylate based instant bond adhesive.
GEMS & MINERALS #512 Jun 1980 pg. 60

Chart of six types of household adhesives, their characteristics, uses, special directions and costs.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Feb 1978 (v.186#2) pg. 232

Which glue should you use? A guide to types of glues and their best uses.
HANDY ANDY Nov 1979 (v.4#2) pg. 13

Tips on applying PVA and white glues.
HOME MECHANIX #691 Nov 1985 (v.81) pg. 14

Sensible workshop gluing tricks. How much wood glue to apply, cleaning up squeeze-out, etc.
HOME MECHANIX #698 Jun 1986 (v.82) pg. 28

Tips on avoiding glue problems when working with wood.
HOME MECHANIX #727 Nov 1988 (v.84) pg. 24

Basic carpentry. Part 14. Gluing and clamping.
HOMEOWNER Jul-Aug 1983 (v.8#4) pg. 76

The art of gluing. The proper use of adhesives. Holding power of various joint and glue combinations.
HOMEOWNER Jan-Feb 1986 (v.11#1) pg. 71

How to choose the right glue for the job. A look at five categories of glue: cyanoacrylate, solvent-type, water-type, two-part, and hot melt. Includes an adhesive identification chart with trade name, generic name, category and primary use.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO #6 Summer 1977 (v.2#2) pg. 122

A look at the latest adhesives available for use in lapidary and jewelry making.
LAPIDARY JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.34#4) pg. 926

Tips on using 3M's 1300-L rubber and gasket adhesive on aircraft carpet, upholstery, deice boots, or door seals.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1996 (v.18#9) pg. 18

Tests determine the relative strength of six glues commonly used by woodworkers.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #535 Dec 1972 (v.68) pg. 95

Tip on using a new super glue called "Flash" which has some new void-filling properties.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #576 May 1976 (v.72) pg. 102

A consumer's guide to adhesives. A look at six basic types of adhesives: white and yellow glues, resorcinol glue, epoxy glue, contact cement, silicone glue, and plastic cements. The uses and disadvantages of each are summarized.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #593 Oct 1977 (v.73) pg. 100

A guide to today's adhesives and tips that will help you pick the right one for a job.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #618 Nov 1979 (v.75) pg. 65

Craft adhesives: what to use and when. A brief overview of common adhesives.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #640 Sep 1981 (v.77) pg. 129

A fumbler's guide to glues. A look at the six most popular over-the-counter glues and how they are used.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #645 Feb 1982 (v.78) pg. 31

Advice on the choice of adhesives for building balsa and composite model aircraft.
MODEL AVIATION Jan 1996 (v.22#1) pg. 131

What you need to know about adhesives to help you choose the right glue for the job.
MODEL RAILROADER Apr 1996 (v.63#4) pg. 76

Making it stick. Twenty-one construction adhesives are tested for strength and versatility. Includes tips on use and storage.
NEW SHELTER Jul-Aug 1985 (v.6#6) pg. 21

A sampling of the most common gluing mistakes, along with suggestions on how to avoid them.
NEW SHELTER Sep 1985 (v.6#7) pg. 104

Adhesives for miniature projects. A user's guide to all-purpose white glues, cyanoacrylate adhesives, glues for paper and wood glues.
NUTSHELL NEWS Aug 1996 (v.26#8) pg. 22

A comparison of Aliphatic Resin, White Glue, and Liquid Hide Glue, and guidelines on which should be used for various woodworking projects.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL Apr 1974 (v.2#4) pg. 5

Adhesives. A guide to the distinctions among some all-around adhesives and their uses in woodworking.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL May-Jun 1998 (v.26#3) pg. 52

Pick the right glue and use it correctly.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1963 (v.119#2) pg. 179

Which glue is best for wood? How and when to use each of six glues: polyvinyl, plastic resin, casein, epoxy, resorcinol and contact cement.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1966 (v.126#2) pg. 138

Boat owner's guide to repair compounds.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1971 (v.135#6) pg. 108

Simple tool for roughing the surface of wood that is to be glued will result in a better glue joint.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1975 (v.143#5) pg. 208

Complete guide on what glue to use for what job, plus tips on assembly and clamping.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1976 (v.145#6) pg. 104

Workshop minicourse. Tips on gluing up wooden items without leaving excess glue on surfaces and without leaving marks from jaws of clamp.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1982 (v.158#2) pg. 93

How to pick the right adhesive and use it.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1983 (v.159#1) pg. 104

Workshop minicourse. Working with wood glue.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1983 (v.160#1) pg. 104

36 woodworking tips. Includes tips on joinery, sanding, measuring, saws & saw blades, gluing, etc.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1984 (v.161#11) pg. 138

Tip: Apply instant-setting cyanoacrylate glues to broken pottery after the joints have been assembled.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1985 (v.162#5) pg. 78

Workshop minicourse. Using common wood glues.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1985 (v.162#9) pg. 54

How glue works. A woodworker's guide to workshop adhesives.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1987 (v.164#11) pg. 100

Stick together. A basic guide to consumer adhesives.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1998 (v.175#5) pg. 113

Plastic mending cements and how to use them.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1963 (v.182#5) pg. 169

Tips on making any glue work better.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1965 (v.187#4) pg. 146

Comprehensive guide to the characteristics and uses of 117 adhesives.
POPULAR SCIENCE Dec 1971 (v.199#6) pg. 92

How to choose and use the new adhesives. Includes some tips on building concrete block walls with a new block adhesive called Beadline.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1974 (v.205#4) pg. 110

How to choose from all those glues. A look at white, epoxy, instant, polyurethane, structural acrylics, silicon-rubber, household, hot-melt, contact, plus many other glues for special purposes (wood, glass, china, plastic, etc.).
POPULAR SCIENCE Sep 1980 (v.217#3) pg. 56

Secrets of the superglues. Tips on selecting, using, and storing cyanoacrylate glues.
POPULAR SCIENCE Feb 1989 (v.234#2) pg. 81

Advice on selecting a glue that will work with redwood.
POPULAR WOODWORKING #88 Jan 1996 (v.15#4) pg. 6

All about glues and gluing used to bond wood.
SCALE WOODCRAFT #4 Spring 1986 pg. 44
Added Info SCALE WOODCRAFT #5 Summer 1986 pg. 5

Survey of new adhesives and use chart.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Nov 1965 (v.36#11) pg. 62

New patching products to repair concrete, plaster, wood, metal and rubber.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Dec 1965 (v.36#12) pg. 48

Glue-up tips. Glue, storage, applicator, squeeze out, etc.
SHOPNOTES #21 May 1995 (v.4) pg. 20

Tip on cutting and using a "glue moat" to trap excess glue and prevent squeeze-out, especially when making built-up moldings.
SHOPNOTES #21 May 1995 (v.4) pg. 29

Tips on keeping glue and work piece warm when working outdoors during the winter by using an electric blanket and heating pads.
SMALL BOAT JOURNAL #47 Feb-Mar 1986 pg. 95

Advice on using latex adhesives (such as latex-based Liquid Nails) to assemble and seal loudspeaker enclosures.
SPEAKER BUILDER 6/1991 [Dec 1991] (v.12#6) pg. 60

Sticking together. Recommended wood adhesives and application techniques when building loudspeaker enclosures.
SPEAKER BUILDER 2/1994 [Mar 1994] (v.15#2) pg. 46

Tips on selecting and testing wood glues for use in critical projects, such as aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1985 (v.34#10) pg. 21

Using aircraft quality adhesives. Part 1. Plastic resin glues (Resorcinol and Aerolite 306). Also illustrates clamping details.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1988 (v.37#10) pg. 33

Using aircraft quality adhesives. Part 2. Epoxies. Working with adhesives. Health hazards. Shear joint testing. Laminating.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1988 (v.37#11) pg. 29

Aerolite. An in-depth look at the urea-formaldehyde chemical reactions behind the primary wood glue used in aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1989 (v.38#6) pg. 27

Information on the choice of wood glue for aircraft use.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1996 (v.45#9) pg. 110
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Dec 1996 (v.45#12) pg. 4

Technique for measuring two-part adhesive compounds in exactly the right proportions using large plastic syringes.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1997 (v.46#3) pg. 101

Advice on selecting and testing various glues for use in wooden aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1999 (v.48#1) pg. 119

Amazing adhesives. The ten basic types of adhesives and what they'll glue for you.
SUNSET Nov 1988 (v.181#5) pg. 108

Choosing the right woodworking glue. Includes a reference chart of 14 brands.
WEEKEND WOODWORKING (PROJECTS) #52 Jul 1996 (v.9#4) pg. 16

Glue squeeze-out. Tips on when you should remove the excess glue.
WOOD MAGAZINE #1 Sep-Oct 1984 (v.1#1) pg. 113

Tip: How to keep contact cement and brush from drying out when working on a large project.
WOOD MAGAZINE #4 Apr 1985 (v.2#2) pg. 16

Choosing the right adhesive. Looks at animal glues, PVA resin glues, thermosetting adhesives, and specialty bonding agents. Some tips.
WOOD MAGAZINE #7 Oct 1985 (v.2#5) pg. 106

Tip: Glue scrap pieces of wood together for use as a "timer" to determine when you can unclamp.
WOOD MAGAZINE #12 Aug 1986 (v.3#4) pg. 16

Tip: Use mineral spirits or lacquer thinner to locate all glue splotches before you begin staining.
WOOD MAGAZINE #16 Apr 1987 (v.4#2) pg. 23

Tip on aligning split or broken pieces of wood when gluing them back together.
WOOD MAGAZINE #20 Dec 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 14

Answers to questions about glues and their holding power.
WOOD MAGAZINE #45 Sep 1991 (v.8#6) pg. 34

Advice on gluing ebony.
WOOD MAGAZINE #66 Dec 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 20

Tip on gluing-up prestained wood.
WOOD MAGAZINE #72 Sep 1994 (v.11#6) pg. 20

Guide to today's advanced woodworking glues.
WOOD MAGAZINE #79 Jun 1995 (v.12#4) pg. 70
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #81 Sep 1995 (v.12#6) pg. 20
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #83 Nov 1995 (v.12#8) pg. 16
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #84 Dec 1995 (v.12#9) pg. 28

A look at five new woodworking glues and evaluations of their performance.
WOOD MAGAZINE #97 Jun 1997 (v.14#4) pg. 22

Advice on glues for working with MDF (medium density fiberboard) and plastic laminate.
WOOD MAGAZINE #97 Jun 1997 (v.14#4) pg. 24

Reference guide to woodworking glues.
WOOD MAGAZINE #107 Aug 1998 (v.15#5) pg. 46

An explanation of why hard lines of glue emerge months after a project is finished.
WOOD MAGAZINE #108 Oct 1998 (v.15#6) pg. 30

Chart of the most common workshop adhesives assists in choosing the right glue.
WOOD MAGAZINE #140 Mar 2002 (v.19#2) pg. 32

Tip on adding coloring to wood glue so that carvings will not reveal glue lines after polishing.
WOODCARVING #39 Jan-Feb 1998 pg. 64

Wood technology. Joining wood with adhesives. Includes a chart which classifies hard and softwood species according to their gluing properties.
WOODENBOAT #44 Jan-Feb 1982 pg. 133

Getting the most out of resorcinol adhesive in boatbuilding.
WOODENBOAT #84 Sep-Oct 1988 pg. 52

Arabol, a latex-type adhesive made from milk. Tips on its use in boatbuilding.
WOODENBOAT #91 Nov-Dec 1989 pg. 111
Added Info WOODENBOAT #93 Mar-Apr 1990 pg. 9

Gluing wood. A review of the principles involved in achieving a strong, permanent bond between two wood surfaces. Looks at epoxy, water-based and organic solvent glues, and cross-linked polyvinyl acetate resins.
WOODENBOAT #119 Jul-Aug 1994 pg. 98

Tip: Add food coloring to glue so that it will be more visible and can be completely scraped off prior to staining wood.
WOODSMITH #17 Sep 1981 pg. 20

A note on the effect of freezing on unused aliphatic resin (yellow glues) and polyvinyl acetate glues (white glue).
WOODSMITH #20 Mar 1982 pg. 23

Tips on gluing oak without getting the black stain reaction caused by water, iron and tanin.
WOODSMITH #33 May-Jun 1984 pg. 23

Tip: Use blobs of hot glue to reattach waste pieces of wood when making compound cuts (such as a cabriole leg).
WOODSMITH #43 Jan-Feb 1986 pg. 3

Selecting the best woods, glues, and finishes for outdoor furniture. Some tips.
WOODSMITH #45 Jun 1986 pg. 13

Shelf life of yellow glues discussed.
WOODSMITH #63 Jun 1989 pg. 23

Tip tells how to revive dried-out pressure-sensitive adhesive.
WOODSMITH #106 Aug 1996 (v.18) pg. 5

Gluing gourmet. A discussion of the basic ingredients of the three categories of wood glue and factors that influence bonding.
WOODWORK #38 Apr 1996 pg. 68

An explanation of wood movement. Why cross-grained glue bonds eventually fail and how to lengthen their survivability.
WOODWORK #40 Aug 1996 pg. 55

Wood Science 101. Woodwork and the relative effects of humidity. An explanation of how moisture changes create stresses on glues and how it effects gluing decisions.
WOODWORK #40 Aug 1996 pg. 56

Gluing-up. Gluing procedures, clamping, jointing and squaring the materials. Tips on jointing wooden parts with glue.
WOODWORKER #1020 Nov 1978 (v.82) pg. 528

Glue and gluing. A look at the use of hot glues (animal glue or "Scotch" glue).
WOODWORKER #1043 Oct 1980 (v.84) pg. 666

Tips on gluing ebony.
WOODWORKER #1047 Feb 1981 (v.85) pg. 112

Adhesives for woodworkers: the state of the art. A guide to those glues which serve the woodworker best. Includes a simple arrangement for low-voltage heating to speed up glue setting.
WOODWORKER #1091 Oct 1984 (v.88) pg. 645, 649

Tip on using superglue as a "clamp" to hold parts together until slower-drying wood glue sets up.
WOODWORKER Aug 1988 (v.92#8) pg. 706

Tip on using animal glue to reinforce furniture pieces that have been weakened by beetle damage.
WOODWORKER Oct 1988 (v.92#10) pg. 939

Premium bonding. A comprehsive review of wood adhesives, typical applications, and new uses for traditional glues. Tips included on injecting glue into a loose joint, gluing veneer to curved surfaces, and cleaning off excess glue.
WOODWORKER Mar 1989 (v.93#3) pg. 212
Added Info WOODWORKER May 1989 (v.93#5) pg. 488
Added Info WOODWORKER Jun 1989 (v.93#6) pg. 584

Test of strength. Results of a woodworker's computerized testing and evaluating of the strength of various adhesives.
WOODWORKER Aug 1989 (v.93#8) pg. 706

Tip on selecting glues for laminating wood-turning blanks.
WOODWORKER Aug 1989 (v.93#8) pg. 735

Advice on the use of various adhesives to meet the needs of woodworkers.
WOODWORKER Mar 1991 (v.95#3) pg. 268

All stuck up. What is available in woodworking glues for cabinetmaking and tips on approaching a large glue-up project to avoid mistakes.
WOODWORKER Apr 1994 (v.98#4) pg. 76

The type of wood joint and its condition are major considerations in selecting a proper glue for repairing old furniture. Some tips.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1978 (v.2#5) pg. 4

Tips on gluing felt pads (and other fabric) to wood.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1981 (v.5#4) pg. 7

Tip: Use an old electric iron to speed up glue setting.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1981 (v.5#4) pg. 28

Restoring antiques. Some thoughts on glues and gluing.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1982 (v.6#1) pg. 12

Tip: Use pressure-sensitive sanding disc cement to install felt.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1982 (v.6#5) pg. 46

Tip: Use iodine to darken a glue line on dark colored wood.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1983 (v.7#6) pg. 66

Tip: Use food coloring to conceal glue used on dark woods.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1987 (v.11#1) pg. 62

Woodworking basics. On glues and gluing. Chart compares characteristics of ten different types of adhesives.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1987 (v.11#6) pg. 12
Added Info WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1988 (v.12#1) pg. 6

Gluing oily woods. A test of 7 different glues on oily tropical hardwoods to see what really works.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL May-Jun 1990 (v.14#3) pg. 18

Gluing up. Simple tools, careful preparation, and a little planning take the stress out of sticky work. Information on glue selection, clamps and clamping techniques, edge-gluing, gluing a mortise-and-tenon frame, gluing a carcase, seating dovetails, etc. Includes tips on making a gluing table for use with pipe clamps.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1994 (v.18#5) pg. 16

Holding power. A guide to gluing and clamping products. Includes an overview of the four broad categories of adhesives (synthetic resins, thermosets, contact cements and natural-protein glues). Instructions on how to apply adhesives and test an application for tensile, shear, cleavage and peal stresses. Describes correct preparation of bonding surfaces, mechanical assistance for edge, end-grain and frame joints and an overview of clamps.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1996 (v.20#5) pg. 39

A sticky problem. Advice on selecting the correct glue for the job in hand. Part 1.
WOODWORKING TODAY #30 Apr 1992 pg. 36

A sticky problem. Advice on selecting the correct glue for the job in hand. Part 2.
WOODWORKING TODAY #31 May 1992 pg. 46

Adhesives for the home workshop. Part 1.
WORKBENCH Nov-Dec 1968 (v.24#6) pg. 58

Where and how to use hot melt glue.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1976 (v.32#5) pg. 74

A round-up of caulks, adhesives and mastics. Covers the types available and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1977 (v.33#5) pg. 54

Amount of glue and pressure needed to achieve a strong glue joint in wood is discussed.
WORKBENCH May-Jun 1988 (v.44#3) pg. 21

Tips on selecting a waterproof glue for outdoor wooden furniture.
WORKBENCH May-Jun 1989 (v.45#3) pg. 19

Tip on using rubbing alcohol to clean surfaces before gluing or painting.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1990 (v.46#5) pg. 56

A guide to wood gluing. Includes a chart of glue characteristics, wood movement basics, and dealing with glue splotching.
WORKBENCH Dec 1994-Jan 1995 (v.50#6) pg. 68

Outdoor glues. Advice on selecting the right one.
WORKBENCH Aug 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 33

ADOBE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ADOBE
sa   RAMMED EARTH CONSTRUCTION
xx   BRICK
xx   BUILDING MATERIAL
xx   CONCRETE

A look at building with adobe.
AMERICANA May-Jun 1977 (v.5#2) pg. 42

Add-on foundations. How to think through the planning and construction. Details for (1) waterproofing existing or new foundations, (2) insulating crawl spaces, (3) flat slab foundations, (4) wood foundations, (5) brick veneer, and (6) adobe brick construction.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #277 Mar 1987 (v.37#3) pg. 60

Building a contemporary adobe home. Insulation, a greenhouse and solar panels are incorporated into this modern version.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #5 Oct-Nov 1981 pg. 48

Rescuing an old adobe. How an architect reclaimed a duplex by drying out the site and stabilizing the foundation.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #22 Aug-Sep 1984 pg. 40

Building with pumice-crete (a lightweight, insulating concrete) to simulate adobe construction.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #77 Oct-Nov 1992 pg. 55

Recipe for an adobe block that includes an asphalt emulsion. It is contained in a larger article about a couple who build an adobe home in northern Ontario, Canada.
HARROWSMITH COUNTRY LIFE #131 Dec 1996 (v.21) pg. 32

A look at an 80% solar-powered adobe home in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #59 Sep-Oct 1979 pg. 113

The owner-built adobe house. Part 3. Making adobe bricks.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #68 Mar-Apr 1981 pg. 50

The owner-built adobe house. Part 4. Putting up the adobe walls.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #69 May-Jun 1981 pg. 112

How we built an adobe home. One couple's experiences building a 24x28-ft. adobe home in West Virginia. Estimated cost: $900.
NEW SHELTER Apr 1980 (v.1#3) pg. 12

All about adobe and adobe house styles.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL Dec 1982 (v.10#12) pg. 247, 259, 261

A look at the adobes of New Mexico and some examples of today's solar adobe homes.
SUNSET Jul 1978 (v.161#1) pg. 82

Tip on building simulated adobe-style interior walls with ordinary studs and gypsum board.
SUNSET Jan 1990 (v.184#1) pg. 88

ADZE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ADZE
xx   AXE
xx   TOOL

Useful tools can be made from old car springs. (1) Bark peeler. (2) Froe. (3) Hand adze or scorp.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1990 (v.74#4) pg. 45

Broadaxe and adze. How to sharpen and use them.
EARLY AMERICAN LIFE Oct 1984 (v.15#5) pg. 61

Making and using a Northwest Coast adze. Other styles of adze are discussed.
FINE WOODWORKING #63 Mar-Apr 1987 pg. 58

The Indian adze. An easily made tool from out of the past. How to forge the blade and attach it to a natural handle made from a forked tree limb.
POPULAR WOODWORKING #54 May 1990 (v.9#6) pg. 29

Roughing tools. A look at the design and use of the adze, axe and hatchet.
POPULAR WOODWORKING #79 Jul 1994 (v.14#1) pg. 24

Tips on sharpening an adze.
WOODWORKER #1068 Nov 1982 (v.86) pg. 807

Tip: Modify a jack plane to simulate adze marks on beams or furniture.
WOODWORKER #1079 Oct 1983 (v.87) pg. 653

Homemade adze. (1) Adze made from a brick hammer. (2) Traditional adze made from a suitable tree branch equipped with a heavy plane iron cutting head.
WOODWORKER Nov 1987 (v.91#11) pg. 1015

AFGHAN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AFGHAN
sa   AFGHAN -- CROCHETED
sa   AFGHAN -- KNITTED
sa   AFGHAN -- WOVEN
sa   BEDSPREAD
sa   BLANKET
x   LAP ROBE
x   THROW
xx   BLANKET

A variety of items to make from leather include a suede patchwork throw with pieces joined by crochet.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1974 (v.52#1) pg. 50, 90

Pennsylvania Dutch hex designs to machine applique on pillows and a throw. Est. cost for four pillows and a throw: $22.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1979 (v.57#7) pg. 55, 68

Patchwork throw made from upholstery remnants joined with featherstitching and backed with velour. Estimated cost: $28.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1981 (v.59#7) pg. 71, 120

Make a lap throw by stenciling an army surplus blanket.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1982 (v.60#1) pg. 43, 58

Recycled-wool throw and pillows. Transform your out-of-fashion wool clothing into a warm five-foot-square throw and matching pillows. Est. cost: $82.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1982 (v.60#7) pg. 39, 60

Folk art afghan. Dress up a blanket with colorful felt motifs. Bind the edges and add bright tassels to the corners. Est. cost: $79.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1983 (v.61#2) pg. 37, 46

Sampler afghan consists of 30 squares of fabric randomly joined with knitted and crocheted squares. Finished size: 50"x60".
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1983 (v.61#10) pg. 108, 154

Make a blue wool throw with crocheted edging. Finished throw measures 60"x 60". Est. cost: $32.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1985 (v.63#3) pg. 109, 166

Fringed applique afghan has felt flowers in each corner. Est. cost: $29.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1987 (v.65#7) pg. 87, 146

Wool fabric throw is embellished with hearts-and-flowers felt cutouts and French knots. Est. cost: $15.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1988 (v.66#7) pg. 88, 91

Amish-style lap robe is sewn from strips of wool in traditional Amish colors. Est. cost: $25.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1989 (v.67#7) pg. 57, 58

Pieced lap robe has Kokopeli figure appliqued in the center with zigzag borders on top and bottom. Matching pillow (12" square) has diagonal zigzags.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1991 (v.69#7) pg. 54, 64, 67

Twelve Days of Christmas motifs to cross-stitch on a purchased afghan.
CRAFTS Nov 1991 (v.14#11) pg. 28, 71

Afghan (40"x50") is decorated with cross stitched floral wreath motifs. Six patterns included.
CRAFTS Mar 1994 (v.17#3) pg. 32, 55

Stitch-a-pansy afghan (38"x55") made from evenweave is divided into squares by rows of twisted-ribbon embroidery. Alternating squares are cross-stitched with pansy motifs.
CRAFTS May 1996 (v.19#5) pg. 38, 41

Wintertime afghan. Cross-stitch motifs of cardinals, evergreens and moose on purchased evenweave afghan fabric.
CRAFTS Dec 1998-Jan 1999 (v.21#12) pg. 24, Insert

Floral cross-stitch afghan Part 1. Intermediate skill level. Three squares.(1) Personalized square with "Wrought In the year ..." and floral motifs in the corners. (2) Impatiens in a basket. (3) Geraniums in clay pot.
CROSS STITCH SAMPLER Summer 1991 (v.9#2) pg. 6

Floral cross-stitch afghan. Part 2. Intermediate skill level. Three squares. (1) Lilacs. (2) Rose hips. (3) Canterbury Bells.
CROSS STITCH SAMPLER Fall 1991 (v.9#3) pg. 14

Fringed afghan features a 15" tall cross-stitched motif of Saint Nicholas with a bag of toys and a Yule tree. "Merry Christmas" message is cross-stitched across the bottom in 4.5" tall letters. border is accented with drawn-thread work. Intermediate skill level.
CROSS STITCH SAMPLER Winter 1991 (v.9#4) pg. 4

Floral cross-stitch afghan. Part 3. Intermediate skill level. Three squares. (1) Magnolia, (2) Rose Gallica, (3) Gladiolus-Freesia.
CROSS STITCH SAMPLER Winter 1991 (v.9#4) pg. 29

Lined throw made from fake suede is 45" square.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 1 1979 (v.92#15) pg. 93, 144

Coffee-n-cream cross-stitch afgan consists of sixteen 13"x16" blocks that are embroidered and then sewn together.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jul 1 1981 (v.94#9) pg. 74

Susan Bate's hairpin lace afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 15 1983 (v.96#16) pg. 151, 230

Twenty-five gorgeous afghans to make. Directions included for 11. Free directions must be ordered for others. Includes everything from charming granny squares to a sophisticated Oriental design.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Oct 1981 (v.193#4) pg. 150

Leopard-print throw is lined with paisley fabric.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Nov 1989 (v.209#5) pg. 136, 298

Cross-stitched afghan features favorite toys from long ago in each of the 12 panels. Measures 56"x84".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1983 (v.28#6) pg. 72, 102

Winners in the Christmas afghan contest. Instructions for 3 decorative wall hung afghans included.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1984 (v.29#4) pg. 94, 4, 16, 28

Lap robe, 35"x43", features autumn cross-stitch motifs of a hare and oak branches.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1987 (v.32#4) pg. 52, 76

Lap robe, 42" square, has a center panel of pinwheel patchwork and a machine-quilted border.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1987 (v.32#4) pg. 56, 80

Plaid stadium robe is made by needleweaving a "Lasetta" ground cloth with yarn.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1987 (v.32#4) pg. 60, 92

"Flowers of the Holy Land" afghan. Twelve different floral sprays are cross-stitched on a 43"x54" afghan made from polyacrylic fabric.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1988 (v.33#3) pg. 66, 90

Victorian lace and velvet throw is appliqued on a mattress pad.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Mar-Apr 1980 (v.3#2) pg. 17, 46

Lap blanket is made from a square of 54" or 60" wide wool fabric, backed and edged with coordinating fabric and lined with polyester sheet batting.
SUNSET Oct 1986 (v.177#4) pg. 140

Prizewinning afghans and coverlets. Photos of the 11 winning designs and instructions for making some of them.
WOMAN'S DAY Mar 10 1981 (v.44#7) pg. 64

Striped hairpin lace afghan, 48"x52".
WORKBASKET Oct 1979 (v.45#1) pg. 19

AFGHAN -- CROCHETED entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AFGHAN -- CROCHETED
xx   AFGHAN
xx   CROCHETING

How to crochet a granny-square afghan.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1973 (v.51#1) pg. 52, 81

How to crochet a contemporary two-color afghan. Six different patterns for 10" squares are given. Est. cost: $48.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1977 (v.55#7) pg. 114, 152

How to crochet a granny-square afghan. Complete instructions included.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1977 (v.55#10) pg. 136, 226

Crocheted afghan is worked on the diagonal. Finished piece measures 50"x62".
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1979 (v.57#9) pg. 51, 142

How to make a chenille granny square afghan.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1980 (v.58#1) pg. 37, 135

Simple crocheted afghan worked from yarn scraps in single crochet with a picot edging.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1981 (v.59#2) pg. 101, 146

Rose pattern crocheted afghan. Finished size: 58"x70".
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1982 (v.60#3) pg. 48, 119

Great-Granny afghan crocheted with scraps of 4-ply knitting yarn equivalent to eleven skeins. Finished size: 48" square. Est. cost: $16.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1982 (v.60#7) pg. 34, 44

Instructions for a crocheted afghan featuring "Grandmother's Flower Garden" pattern.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Nov 1982 (v.60#11) pg. J12

Off-white afghan worked entirely in a double crochet variation. Measures 49"x63". Est. cost: $16.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1984 (v.62#2) pg. 34, 48

Crocheted afghan, 60"x50", combines crocheted popcorn stitch and openwork pattern squares. Est. cost: $25.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1986 (v.64#3) pg. 81, 162

Rainbow afghan to crochet. Est. cost: $9.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1987 (v.65#7) pg. 68, 110

"Diamond" afghan is made from 55 crocheted diamond shapes. Butterfly motifs are cross-stitched on 12 panels. Est. cost: $35.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1987 (v.65#7) pg. 74, 118

Twenty squares worked in single crochet are joined to create an afghan. Beginner project.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1988 (v.66#1) pg. 33

Crocheted lap robe, 48"x61", is made up of sixty-three 7" blocks in a floral motif.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1988 (v.66#9) pg. 111, 119

"Square-in-a-Square" afghan, in double-crochet, is an updated version of a granny-square afghan. Est. cost: $25.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1989 (v.67#7) pg. 57, 58

Strip-pieced afghan is crocheted from yarn scraps.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1989 (v.67#9) pg. 96, 113

"Yipes, Stripes" crocheted afghan.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Dec 1989 (v.67#12) pg. 63, 70

Vine and Lace afghan (48"x62") is crocheted in panels of lace and single crochet. Flowering vines are cross-stitched on the single crochet panels.
CRAFTS Apr 1991 (v.14#4) pg. 34

Popcorn afghan. A red, white, and blue version of the granny square afghan has a circle of popcorn stitches at the center of each square. Finished size is 44"x52".
CRAFTS Jul 1991 (v.14#7) pg. 60

Warm up America, a project to make afghans to give to the homeless to keep them warm. Knit and crochet patterns for knitting 7"x9" afghan squares.
CRAFTS Sep 1992 (v.15#9) pg. 86

Christmas Rose granny square afghan (46"x56") to crochet.
CRAFTS Nov 1992 (v.15#11) pg. 52

Two-color afghan (50"x68"). Three V crochet pattern panels are bordered by strips with a linear pattern.
CRAFTS Feb 1993 (v.16#2) pg. 70

Trip around the world crocheted afghan.
CRAFTS Sep 1994 (v.17#9) pg. 44

Granny's path afghan (84"x112"). Crochet mini granny squares into "quilt-like" blocks to make a bed-size afghan.
CRAFTS Sep 1995 (v.18#9) pg. 44, 51

Granny puff crochet afghan (48"x58"). Classic granny square features a raised popcorn stitch worked in two colors.
CRAFTS Oct 1995 (v.18#10) pg. 70

Ombre ripples afghan (49"x68") is worked entirely in double crochet stitches and is a suitable project for a beginner.
CRAFTS Mar 1996 (v.19#3) pg. 72

Maple leaf afghan (52"x58" plus fringe) is worked in double-chain stitch. Maple leaves are crocheted in chenille and appliqued all around the border of the afghan.
CRAFTS Sep 1996 (v.19#9) pg. 26

Hearts Aplenty afghan (44"x65") is crocheted in shell stitch using three shades of yarn to form a pattern of interlocking hearts.
CRAFTS Feb 1997 (v.20#2) pg. 20, 51

Rose Garden afghan (46"x62") is crocheted in squares with raised variegated roses against a leaf background.
CRAFTS Mar 1997 (v.20#3) pg. 18, 49

Pretty Posies All In A Row afghan (48"x60") to crochet.
CRAFTS Jun 1997 (v.20#6) pg. 66

Sunflower afghan (52"x58") is worked entirely in single crochet stitch and features rows of large sunflower motifs.
CRAFTS Sep 1997 (v.20#9) pg. 20, 55

Rainbow afghan (59" square) is crocheted with the motif of a rainbow arching over a bed of flowers.
CRAFTS Feb 1998 (v.21#2) pg. 20, 43

Bloomin' Beauty afghan (51"x61") to crochet features tri-petal flowers amid a lacy background. Intermediate skill level.
CRAFTS May 1998 (v.21#5) pg. 28, 51

Handkerchief hem afghan (44"x59") is made up of 151 double-crocheted squares. Intermediate skill level.
CRAFTS Sep 1998 (v.21#9) pg. 32

Weekend afghan (45"x60") is crocheted using a large-size Q hook and four strands of yarn.
CRAFTS Nov 1998 (v.21#11) pg. 46

Ripples and rosebuds afghan is crocheted in a traditional ripple pattern. Rosebuds, in two shades of coral, are crocheted in pairs on each chevron.
CRAFTS May 1999 (v.22#4) pg. 22

Crocheted eyelet afghan (56"x63").
CREATIVE IDEAS FOR LIVING Jan-Feb 1990 (v.21#1) pg. 42, 80

Crocheted trellis afghan (62"x56").
CREATIVE IDEAS FOR LIVING May-Jun 1990 (v.21#3) pg. 80

Crocheted afghan (43"x43") features the coloration and pattern of the old Amish quilt design "Trip Around the World".
CREATIVE IDEAS FOR LIVING Sep-Oct 1990 (v.21#5) pg. 23

How to crochet an afghan of brightly colored squares that resemble a patchwork quilt.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1977 (v.8#7) pg. 42, 96
Correction DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Dec 1977 (v.8#10) pg. 8

Pennsylvania Dutch Afghan is worked in the afghan stitch in bright colored blocks. Patterns for hearts, birds, tulips and other flowers furnished.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1978 (v.9#7) pg. 40

Afghan squares are crocheted diagonally.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1980 (v.11#4) pg. 42, 53

A quilt-block afghan to crochet. Two patterns furnished. (1) Straight furrow. (2) Barn raising.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1980 (v.11#7) pg. 66

Medallion afghan. The 656 small (2") medallions are worked in 22 colors and sewn together. Ends are trimmed with knotted fringe.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Nov 1980 (v.11#9) pg. 50

An afghan sampler to crochet. Each block features a different crochet stitch.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jan-Feb 1981 (v.12#1) pg. 90

Make this crocheted intarsia afghan with a flower cart motif.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1981 (v.12#4) pg. 48

Crochet a mohair textured (seafoam) afghan.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jun 1981 (v.12#5) pg. 10

Folk art florals to stitch or paint. (1) Crocheted afghan and pillow set. (2) Tole-painted lantern.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Oct 1981 (v.12#8) pg. 66

Fluffy crocheted afghan and bed jacket.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Nov 1981 (v.12#9) pg. 80

An "Evergreens and Snow" afghan to crochet and cross-stitch.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Dec 1981 (v.12#10) pg. 38

Easy-to-make afghan "grows" quickly in rounds of familiar double crochet.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jan-Feb 1982 (v.13#1) pg. 36

Crocheted afghan and matching pillow with a stylized lamb motif.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Mar 1982 (v.13#2) pg. 57, 101

Rainbow afghan features stripes of 10 different colors worked in a loose tension crochet.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jun 1982 (v.13#5) pg. 64

Crocheted "woven" afghan is made of a crocheted striped mesh with strands of yarn woven vertically through the mesh.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jul-Aug 1982 (v.13#6) pg. 91

Crocheted afghan is worked in chenille yarn in a simple variation of the lark's foot stitch.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1982 (v.13#7) pg. 38

Use popcorn stitch in crocheting a pumpkin-colored afghan.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Oct 1982 (v.13#8) pg. 6

Choose game bird designs to crochet, embroider and quilt. Includes instructions for: (1) Game bird wall quilt featuring ducks and cattails. (2) Crocheted game bird afghan featuring ducks.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Nov 1982 (v.13#9) pg. 85, 106

Rose garden afghan is 46"x60" and crocheted in squares that are clusters of nine roses of varying colors.
FAMILY CIRCLE Apr 24 1978 (v.91#5) pg. 108, 230

Snowflake afghan, 52"x76", is made from two sizes of snowflake pattern squares. Matching fringed pillow is made from smaller squares.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jan 9 1979 (v.92#1) pg. 14

Rosette afghan is a series of 108 squares with rosettes in the center of each.
FAMILY CIRCLE Apr 24 1979 (v.92#6) pg. 119, 162

Buttercup crocheted afghan is worked in squares with contrasting strips between squares and around the edge.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 20 1979 (v.92#16) pg. 96, 166

Six crocheted afghans. (1) Morning glory. (2) Black-eyed susans. (3) Blue daisies. (4) Violet bouquet. (5) Red roses. (6) Oleander.
FAMILY CIRCLE Mar 11 1980 (v.93#4) pg. 80, 152

Single-crochet sampler afghan and bolster to store it in.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 7 1980 (v.93#14) pg. 100, 132

Gardenia crocheted afghan. Measures 62"x74".
FAMILY CIRCLE Feb 24 1981 (v.94#3) pg. 72

Folk art crafts. Crocheted afghan incorporates the classic Log Cabin patchwork pattern.
FAMILY CIRCLE Sep 1 1981 (v.94#12) pg. 78, 114

Antique crochet patterns with a new twist of color. Swedish popcorn stitch bedspread, afghans, doilies, pillows, etc.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 13 1981 (v.94#14) pg. 112

Crocheted afghan (50"x70") is made from 4 pounds of leftover yarn from other projects.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 3 1981 (v.94#15) pg. 92, 131

Traditional granny square afghan and pillow top are crocheted in red and white. 45"x60" afghan requires 48 squares.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 3 1981 (v.94#15) pg. 99, 161

Afghans to crochet piece-by-piece. (1) Heart motif. (2) Tulip afghan. (3) Butterfly afghan. (4) Block motif. (5) Tile squares afghan. (6) Crocheted buttercup afghan. (7) Violet afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE Feb 2 1982 (v.95#2) pg. 76, 116

Afghans. (1) Crocheted floral afghan (50"x66") made from 8"x8" squares. (2). Crocheted baby afghan (27"x37") made from 5"x5" squares.
FAMILY CIRCLE May 18 1982 (v.95#7) pg. 126

Unique crocheted afghan and pillow feature large, stylized tulips in various colors.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 8 1982 (v.95#8) pg. 68

Victorian-style, crocheted white-roses afghan measures 53"x67".
FAMILY CIRCLE Sep 1 1982 (v.95#12) pg. 88, 116

Crocheted hexagon afghan worked in ruby, cream, and violet. Measures 51"x72". Est. cost: $16.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 26 1982 (v.95#15) pg. 98, 131

Crocheted afghan is decorated with two rows of baby chicks. Dimensions: 35"x45". Est. cost: $21.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 26 1982 (v.95#15) pg. 102, 150

Victorian spider-web crocheted afghan (50"x60") is tied with satin bows.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 16 1982 (v.95#16) pg. 112, 156

Crocheted afghan for a baby is threaded with gingham check. Measures 28"x36".
FAMILY CIRCLE Jan 25 1983 (v.96#2) pg. 75, 114

Log cabin crocheted afghan. Measures 54"x76".
FAMILY CIRCLE Mar 8 1983 (v.96#4) pg. 98, 120

Five crocheted afghans resemble old favorite designs, but they are worked with the latest yarns and techniques.
FAMILY CIRCLE Apr 19 1983 (v.96#6) pg. 104, 165

Crocheted flower afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE May 31 1983 (v.96#8) pg. 100

Afghan made from individually crocheted 3" squares.
FAMILY CIRCLE Aug 2 1983 (v.96#11) pg. 122, 128

Ruffled afghan is crocheted in Orlon knitting worsted and synthetic mohair for contrasting texture.
FAMILY CIRCLE Aug 23 1983 (v.96#12) pg. 74, 112

Man-size crocheted afghan (53"x72") is made from 12 giant (17") squares.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 25 1983 (v.96#15) pg. 96, 144

Caron's crocheted striped popcorn afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 15 1983 (v.96#16) pg. 148, 200

Bucilla's crocheted daisy afghan. All crochet, no loom to buy.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 15 1983 (v.96#16) pg. 149, 206

National's crocheted geometric afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 15 1983 (v.96#16) pg. 151, 230

Afghan art. Crochet simple white squares with colored borders. Then, decorate the center with stenciled designs. Includes patterns for iris, duck decoy, and Pennsylvania Dutch.
FAMILY CIRCLE Mar 6 1984 (v.97#4) pg. 72, 92

Crocheted afghan features a unique medallion and stripe design.
FAMILY CIRCLE Apr 17 1984 (v.97#6) pg. 19

Three afghans to crochet. (1) Pastel granny square afghan. (2) Tea rose afghan and pillow. (3) Giant granny square afghan (56"x56") with fringe.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 2 1984 (v.97#14) pg. 82, 107

Blue Diamond afghan (66"x47") is crocheted in raised treble stitch. Panels of open diamond motifs are separated by panels of raised ribs.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Jun-Jul 1996 (v.40#3) pg. 82
Correction FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Aug-Sep 1996 (v.40#4) pg. 4

Granny ripple afghan (42"x56") is crocheted in a shell-based pattern with a four-row repeat. Edges are finished in a lacy shell motif.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Aug-Sep 1996 (v.40#4) pg. 42

Elephant afghan to crochet (53"x34") has 12 squares with grey and pink elephant motifs against a white background. Separately crocheted trunks are sewn to the elephants.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] May-Jun 1997 (v.41#3) pg. 20

Heather afghan (46"x69") is crocheted in squares. Four squares are then joined into a larger square. Finished afghan has four strips of six large squares.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Jul-Aug 1997 (v.41#4) pg. 12

Diamond afghan to crochet (49"x60") resembles an argyle pattern.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] May-Jun 1998 (v.42#3) pg. 34

Herb-garden afghan has diamonds with herbs embroidered on them. Embroidery patterns for chives, thyme, chiccory and caraway included.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Feb 1978 (v.186#2) pg. 122, 164

Two blue-on-white afghans. (1) Dutch Tiles, with afghan-stitch panels embroidered with a Delft-like pattern, measures 47"x68". (2) Meissen, with crocheted squares sewn in strips and bordered with embroidered afghan-stitch panels, measures 40"x64".
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Apr 1978 (v.186#4) pg. 156, 252

Nostalgic Fan afghan is crocheted in mohair.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Feb 1979 (v.188#2) pg. 130, 182

Animal Kingdom afghan is 65"x66" and is worked all in single crochet. Pattern has a row of zebras, a row of elephants, a row of lions and a row of camels.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING May 1979 (v.188#5) pg. 169, 194

Irish rose afghan blooms with dozens of dainty crocheted flowers stitched on a lacy mesh background. Measures 58"x71".
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Apr 1981 (v.192#4) pg. 140

Bridal afghan. A hearts-and-roses keepsake to commemorate the special day. Crocheted in afghan stitch, including the wedding vow, initials, date, and doves.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Jun 1982 (v.194#6) pg. 162, 270

Poinsettia partners to crochet. Appliqued design has embroidered center. Pillow is 20" square. Afghan is 48"x64".
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Nov 1982 (v.195#5) pg. 192, 337

"Counting sheep" afghan (44"x60") and matching pillow to single crochet.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Nov 1983 (v.197#5) pg. 174, 344

Crochet a 42"x54" afghan featuring blocks of trumpeting angels and French horns. Matching pillows.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Nov 1985 (v.201#5) pg. 156, 292

Antique rose-pattern afghan to single-crochet, square by square.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Apr 1990 (v.210#4) pg. 132, 273

Vanna White's tea time afghan (44"x66") features tea cup motifs.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Jan 1995 (v.220#1) pg. 136

Herb garden afghan is worked in diamonds, with each containing an embroidered herb. Patterns for chives, chicory, thyme and caroway included. Afghan is 58" wide & 64" long, plus fringe.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Spring-Summer 1978 pg. 46, 135

Fan afghan is crocheted in pastel shades of mohair.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Spring-Summer 1979 pg. 60, 125

Cape Cod coverlet is crocheted in a popcorn stitch with leaf and diamond accents.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Fall 1979-Winter 1980 pg. 52, 143

Star afghan, 54"x62", is crocheted in afghan stitch and embroidered in cross stitch.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Fall 1979-Winter 1980 pg. 59, 145

Village afghan. Each square is cross-stitched with a pattern (floral bouquets, school house, city hall, houses).
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Spring-Summer 1980 pg. 71, 139

Plaid afghan has a crocheted base with chains of yarn woven through the openings.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Fall 1980-Winter 1981 pg. 58, 130

Dogwood afghan crocheted in 9" squares. Finished size: 48x66".
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Spring-Summer 1981 pg. 67, 128

Crocheted afghan, 44"x66" plus fringe, is interwoven with ribbon.
HANDMADE 2/1986 pg. 41, 49

V-striped afghan, 36"x46", is worked in pastel colors.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Fall-Winter 1978 (v.9#1) pg. 54, 98

Large (90"x108") granny square afghan with fringe on all four sides.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Fall 1978 (v.23#3) pg. 107, 80

Child's Christmas afghan is crocheted in twelve blocks, one for each of the "twelve days of Christmas".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Winter 1978 (v.23#4) pg. 20, 104

Lacy openwork pattern afghan with ruffled border.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1979 (v.24#1) pg. 86, 134

An afghan to crochet a square at a time. Patterns for crocheted-in tulips, bluebells, roses and daisies are furnished. Alternating squares are solids and stripes.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Summer 1979 (v.24#2) pg. 44, 90

Christmas Rose afghan is crocheted in squares of single crochet with popcorn borders. Roses are embroidered on finished squares.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Winter 1979 (v.24#4) pg. 70, 34

Fringed crocheted afghan, 54"x69", and matching pillow are worked in a geometric pattern in popcorn crochet on afghan stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Winter 1979 (v.24#4) pg. 113, 32

Heart pattern afghan is worked in single crochet and cross-stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1980 (v.25#1) pg. 110, 52

Heirloom flower afghan. Blossoms are crocheted with pecot centers and linked with chain loop stars.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Fall 1980 (v.25#3) pg. 107, 168

Tapestry afghan is crocheted in afghan stitch and then a reindeer scene is embroidered in counted cross-stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Winter 1980 (v.25#4) pg. 92, 6

Filet crochet afghan has heart patterns and is outlined with interlaced ribbon.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan-Feb 1981 (v.26#1) pg. 98, 44

Field of Flowers afghan and matching pillow are worked in hexagons with raised circles in the middle.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1981 (v.26#2) pg. 54, 115

Chromatic crochet. Two step-pattern crocheted afghans worked in a wide range of colors.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jul-Aug 1981 (v.26#4) pg. 84, 36, 30

Log Cabin patchwork afghan is crocheted from twenty blocks. Finished size: 60x75".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Sep-Oct 1981 (v.26#5) pg. 72, 22

Della Robbia afghan.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1981 (v.26#6) pg. 82

Crocheted afghan (46"x66") consists of chain stitch panels of white joined to colorful "flower squares" which are a variation of the granny square.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan-Feb 1982 (v.27#1) pg. 86, 57

Large, lacy flowers in Irish-type crochet alternate in rows across this afghan (48"x63").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan-Feb 1982 (v.27#1) pg. 88, 52

Baby blocks, a simple but graphic patchwork pattern, is worked in crocheted diamonds. The blocks are then sewn together for a bold afghan that creates a myriad of optical illusions.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1982 (v.27#2) pg. 58, 101

Lone Star pattern afghan is crocheted in the shape of an octagon. Finished size is 80" across.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1982 (v.27#2) pg. 59, 12

Crocheted pillow (15" square) and afghan (50"x66") feature stylized tulips.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS May-Jun 1982 (v.27#3) pg. 48, 82, 83

Full-size afghan is crocheted in Fair Isle patterns.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jul-Aug 1982 (v.27#4) pg. 79, 116

Afghan-stitch and cross-stitch are combined on this flower-pattern afghan you crochet in strips and join with chain loop "fagoting". Matching pillow and Christmas stocking included.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1982 (v.27#6) pg. 58, 90

Log cabin patchwork pattern is featured in this crocheted afghan. Measures 56"x56".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1982 (v.27#6) pg. 61, 105

The "12 Days of Christmas" afghan. The twelve motifs are cross-stitched on afghan-stitch crochet. Measures 50"x68".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1982 (v.27#6) pg. 67, 92

Prize winning designs in the Four Seasons afghan contest. Includes instructions for (1) Winter (House and sleigh). (2) Spring (Basket of flowers). (3) Summer (Sailboat on lake). (4) Fall (Ducks in cattails).
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1982 (v.27#6) pg. 68

Morning glories are cross-stitched on this crocheted afghan (58"x65").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1983 (v.28#2) pg. 52, 106

A "field of flowers" crocheted afghan is worked in hexagon-shaped blocks. Measures 58"x80".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS May-Jun 1983 (v.28#3) pg. 64

Heirloom afghan combines squares made by cross-stitch and crochet.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jul-Aug 1983 (v.28#4) pg. 96, 97

How to make a "cross stitched" afghan without stitching. Just crochet 12 squares and then stencil them using pre-cut stencils and fabric paints.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1984 (v.29#2) pg. 82

Navy and natural afghan is reminiscent of an old-fashioned woven throw. Measures 46"x60".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1984 (v.29#4) pg. 76, 123

Four Christmas afghans to make as wall hangings. Two of them show Santa and his reindeer. One is a large Santa head and one is a Christmas tree.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1984 (v.29#5) pg. 84, 114, 118, 120, 121

Crochet a "Christmas list" afghan and embroider with cross-stitch. Measures 58"x76".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1984 (v.29#6) pg. 72, 90

Crochet a 62"x56" afghan with cross-stitched flowers.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1985 (v.30#1) pg. 98, 99

Tri-color, chevron-pattern afghan to knit or crochet.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1985 (v.30#4) pg. 68, 22, 109

Twin-bed sized afghan (42"x62") crocheted in "medallion" squares.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1985 (v.30#6) pg. 58, 96

Crocheted settee and chair cushions and matching afghan are worked in a two-colored, textured stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1986 (v.31#1) pg. 71, 26, 66, 115

Crocheted pineapple-motif afghan, 50"x74".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1986 (v.31#2) pg. 55, 98

Folk-art afghan is crocheted in afghan stitch. A vine and bird motif is embroidered on the three panels.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1986 (v.31#4) pg. 64, 104

Crocheted "Tumbling Blocks" afghan, 40"x46".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1986 (v.31#5) pg. 74, 52

Poinsettia medallion bands are alternated with ripple-stitch crocheted bands to make a 40"x64" afghan.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1986 (v.31#6) pg. 52, 20

Southwestern-inspired crafts. (1) A variety of plain baskets are painted with geometric motifs to look like handwoven Indian designs. (2) Patchwork table runner, 18"x36". (3) Crocheted afghan, 57"x60", is worked in traditional Mexican blanket patterns. (4) Painted wooden Navajo Indian children and tiny sheep figurines.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1987 (v.32#3) pg. 60, 4, 78, 79

Classic argyle afghan worked in single and double crochet.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1987 (v.32#6) pg. 48, 12

"Moroccan Tile" afghan, 51"x43", features stylized flowers and checkerboard squares and is crocheted in afghan stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 37, 71

"Field of Diamonds" crocheted afghan measures 42"x60".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 38, 75

Easy-to-crochet textured-pattern afghan measures 55"x68".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 47, 82

"Tulip Time" afghan, 46"x57", in single and double crochet features two-color textured bands, openwork edging and rows of cross-stitched tulip motifs.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1988 (v.33#3) pg. 74, 107

Floral filet-crochet throw, 37"x46", has alternating panels of eyelet diamond motifs. Floral motifs are accented with outlines of embroidery.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1988 (v.33#4) pg. 44, 37

Crocheted throw, 44"x48", has panels of bobbles alternating with panels in afghan stitch that are cross-stitched with a floral motif.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1988 (v.33#5) pg. 61, 16

Geometric-design crocheted afghan.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Sep 1988 (v.33#6) pg. 42, 26

Multi-color granny-square afghan, 90"x108". Pattern was originally published in Fall 1978 issue of McCalls magazine.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Sep 1988 (v.33#6) pg. 58, 26

"Blocks of Color" crocheted throw, 46"x54", is worked in rows of single crochet and finished with a double-crochet border of blocks and stripes.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1988 (v.33#7) pg. 45, 31

"Starry Night" throw, 38"x50", is crocheted in blocks of four-pointed bobble stars. Ends are fringed.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1988 (v.33#7) pg. 48, 40

Two-color crocheted afghan, 51"x67", is made up of blocks with a pinwheel motif.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1989 (v.34#1) pg. 70, 23

Easy-to-crochet afghan, 48"x68", resembles a colorful patchwork quilt.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1989 (v.34#3) pg. 60, 16

Crocheted throw or afghan (41"x45") lends a 19th century touch with its airy lace patterning and delicate fringe.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1990 (v.35#1) pg. 67, 107

Rose petal afghan to crochet (48"x56").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1990 (v.35#3) pg. 56, 78

Kilim afghan (46"x63") to crochet is inspired by ethnic rugs woven for centuries in the Mideast. Diamond-patterned squares are worked in an assortment of colors and joined asymmetrically. Finish with blue sashing and fringe.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1990 (v.35#4) pg. 45, 77

Soft decorator afghan (44"x55") is worked in single crochet decorated with front post stitches and crocheted floral clusters.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1990 (v.35#5) pg. 65, 98

Tipped granny square afghan (48"x60") to crochet.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1991 (v.36#1) pg. 58, 82

Plaid afghan (54"x64") is worked in double crochet in white and shades of lavender to resemble a gingham fabric.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1991 (v.37#1) pg. 42, 70

Crocheted mosaic afghan (50"x60") with long fringe is worked in an openwork mesh and interwoven with bundles of yarn.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1991 (v.37#3) pg. 60, 69

Crocheted shell afghan (45"x62") is worked in three colors.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1991 (v.37#3) pg. 63, 73

Crocheted hexagon afghan (44"x64"), a variation on the ever-popular granny square, features white centers and borders on the brightly colored hexagons that are joined only at their points.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1991 (v.37#5) pg. 67, 78

Autumn Blossoms afghan (46"x64") is crocheted in a yellow stripes, separated by blue rows of bobbles, which also accent the edge.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1991 (v.37#5) pg. 67, 80

Crocheted afghan (50"x60") has a colorful popcorn-stitch border.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1991 (v.37#6) pg. 46, 50

Checkered blocks afghan (50"x72") in a single color has alternating squares crocheted in afghan stitch and slip-stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1991 (v.37#6) pg. 46, 48

Richly textured afghan (62"X84") and matching pillow (18"X18") are crocheted in afghan stitch to look like Aran knitting. Panels feature diamonds and zigzag patterns made of bobbles.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1992 (v.38#1) pg. 74

Crocheted floral afghan (44"x56") is worked in Tunisian crochet stitch. Flowers and vine motif are cross-stitched on white panels.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1992 (v.38#3) pg. 62

Ocean Waves crocheted afghan (48"x60").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1992 (v.38#4) pg. 22

Autumn Luxury Persian-look afghan (54"x49") is crocheted sideways in an afghan pattern stitch in jewel tones of mohair.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1992 (v.38#5) pg. 24, 28

Aran crocheted afghan (50"x67").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1993 (v.39#1) pg. 79, 82

Floral Garden crocheted afghan (48"x63").
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1993 (v.39#2) pg. 62, 84

"Fiesta" crocheted afghan has striped bands in five colors and a variety of pattern stitches. A project for a beginner.
NEEDLE & CRAFT Aug 1989 (v.12#4) pg. 48, 35

Three beautiful afghans to make from leftover yarn. (1) Crocheted block afghan worked in a patchwork design. (2) Diagonally striped knitted afghan. (3) Crocheted block afghan resembles a large quilt square.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Mar-Apr 1979 (v.2#2) pg. 40, 54

Grandmother's Afghan. Crocheted in a stripped herringbone pattern and incorporating a new stitch.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY May-Jun 1979 (v.2#3) pg. 41, 54

Flower Tile afghan.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jul-Aug 1980 (v.3#4) pg. 22, 57

Two styles of lap robes and matching pillows that simulate Amish quilts.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1981 (v.4#1) pg. 14

An array of projects for baby and nursery. (1-3) Apple, Flowers and Yellow Things quilts. (4) Clown wall hanging. (5) Clown rattle doll. (6) Crocheted afghan. (7) Crocheted cap and booties. (8) Fair Isle sweater, cap and booties.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY May-Jun 1981 (v.4#3) pg. 38

Jewel-tone afghan is crocheted in a mohair blend.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1983 (v.6#1) pg. 19, 51

Modern art granny square afghan and matching pillows to crochet.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Sep-Oct 1983 (v.6#5) pg. 18, 48

Crochet an afghan, or lap cover in "grandmother's fan" motif.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1984 (v.7#1) pg. 12, 41

Crochet a "hearts" and ruffles afghan. Measures 48" square.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1985 (v.8#1) pg. 10, 40

Crochet and cross-stitch a baby afghan (46"x35") and a matching pillow.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1985 (v.8#1) pg. 11, 41

Crochet a dotted Swiss afghan that measures 45"x65".
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1985 (v.8#1) pg. 52

Crochet a goodluck afghan with "cloverleaves and popcorn".
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Mar-Apr 1985 (v.8#2) pg. 9, 39

Crochet a 44"x70" lattice lace afghan.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY May-Jun 1985 (v.8#3) pg. 55

Three-color afghan is crocheted using a large (size Q) hook. Finished size: 60"x66".
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1986 (v.9#1) pg. 9, 41

Crocheted "Hearts & Flowers" afghan is worked in twenty blocks, which are then cross-stitched with heart and floral motifs. Finished size: 36"x55".
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1986 (v.9#1) pg. 17, 33, 47

"Flowertime" crocheted afghan. Each block is made up of four raised flowers. Emphasis is on using scrap yarn in as many colors as possible. Finished size: 50"x78".
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Mar-Apr 1986 (v.9#2) pg. 11

Crocheted afghan is worked in a double-crochet mesh. Then strands of handspun yarn are woven through the mesh.
SPIN-OFF Winter 1993 (v.17#4) pg. 84

How to crochet a reversible afghan with one color on one side and a second color on the reverse.
THREADS #51 Feb-Mar 1994 pg. 12
Added Info THREADS #55 Oct-Nov 1994 pg. 10

Rising Sun afghan.
WOMAN'S DAY Mar 27 1978 (v.41#8) pg. 34, 120

Confetti afghan, 66" square, is crocheted like a large granny square.
WOMAN'S DAY Oct 23 1978 (v.42#2) pg. 117, 198

Striped afghan to crochet is worked on the diagonal.
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 1 1979 (v.43#2) pg. 74, 114

Reversible lap robe in shell crochet.
WOMAN'S DAY Jan 15 1980 (v.43#5) pg. 112, 157

Four granny-square afghans with raised flowers in the center of some squares. (1) Delphinium. (2) Daisy. (3) Gardenia Lace. (4) Bed-of-Roses.
WOMAN'S DAY Feb 12 1980 (v.43#6) pg. 69, 102

Textured afghan.
WOMAN'S DAY Sep 23 1980 (v.43#15) pg. 44, 140

Striped afghan worked in double crochet.
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 4 1980 (v.44#2) pg. 91, 153

Summer afghan is crocheted in beige, pink, turquoise and green. Flower-centered granny squares (4"x4") make up the afghan.
WOMAN'S DAY Aug 11 1981 (v.44#13) pg. 78, 134

Starry night afghan is a crochet-by-square project.
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 3 1981 (v.45#2) pg. 78, 131

Scottish Tartan and Thistles crocheted afghan. Dimensions: 59"x61" plus fringe.
WOMAN'S DAY Jan 12 1982 (v.45#5) pg. 77, 100

Lace-struck granny afghan is assembled from single-crochet strips and granny squares.
WOMAN'S DAY Aug 10 1982 (v.45#13) pg. 78, 114

Afghan and matching pillow. Afghan made from 4 crochet triangles. Pillow made from 1 crochet triangle.
WOMAN'S DAY Aug 10 1982 (v.45#13) pg. 79, 117

Hand-crocheted afghan in double-crochet diamond pattern with ruffled border. Measures 52"x64".
WOMAN'S DAY Oct 26 1982 (v.46#2) pg. 78, 140

Crochet 5 different patchwork afghans. Instructions included for geese in flight, square-in-a-square, evening star, pinwheels, and the poinsettia.
WOMAN'S DAY Jan 10 1984 (v.47#5) pg. 68, 80

Crochet a granny-square and ripple paneled afghan. Measures 35"x52".
WOMAN'S DAY Dec 11 1984 (v.48#4) pg. 134, 184

Crocheted afghan is made up of squares in two colors in a triangle pattern. Completed afghan measures 56"x39".
WORKBASKET Jan 1978 (v.43#4) pg. 12

Stained glass pattern afghan is made of 176 triangles.
WORKBASKET Mar 1978 (v.43#6) pg. 47

Striped afghan is 46"x65" with three colors of stripes running the length of it, ending in knotted fringe.
WORKBASKET May 1978 (v.43#8) pg. 32

Four-color granny square afghan. Finished size is 54"x72".
WORKBASKET Jul 1978 (v.43#10) pg. 46

Giant granny square afghan to crochet.
WORKBASKET Aug 1979 (v.44#11) pg. 8

Six-petal flowers afghan crocheted in hexagon blocks.
WORKBASKET Jan 1980 (v.45#3) pg. 12

Crocheted rainbow afghan.
WORKBASKET Mar 1980 (v.45#5) pg. 8

Crocheted walnut shell afghan is striped with various yarn colors and textures.
WORKBASKET Sep 1980 (v.45#10) pg. 6

Prize-winning afghan is worked in double crochet with rows of ridges. Measures 50"x64".
WORKBASKET Oct 1980 (v.46#1) pg. 8

Warm Glow afghan is crocheted in four panels of subtle color-changing stripes. Trimmed with a cluster edging.
WORKBASKET Jan 1981 (v.46#3) pg. 6

Split Rail pattern afghan.
WORKBASKET Feb 1981 (v.46#4) pg. 34

Two-color afghan alternates solid color squares and two-color checked squares. Edge is bordered with a stripe.
WORKBASKET Feb 1981 (v.46#4) pg. 56

Scalloped ripple afghan.
WORKBASKET Oct 1981 (v.47#1) pg. 10

Country casual afghan and matching pillow.
WORKBASKET Oct 1981 (v.47#1) pg. 60

Afghan with raised diamond design looks like an Irish classic. Worked in afghan stitch with picots to make raised popcorn design.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1981 (v.47#2) pg. 34

Colorful afghan is made of granny squares, each with two or more borders to give a more intricate look.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1981 (v.47#2) pg. 46

Afghan of contrasting blocks.
WORKBASKET Jan 1982 (v.47#3) pg. 42

Fireside afghan in stripes that feature embroidered accents.
WORKBASKET Jan 1982 (v.47#3) pg. 51

Busy day afghan.
WORKBASKET Feb 1982 (v.47#4) pg. 64

Throw is crocheted in afghan stitch with cross stitch embroidery added for the design.
WORKBASKET Mar 1982 (v.47#5) pg. 16

Rainbow squares afghan.
WORKBASKET Aug 1982 (v.47#9) pg. 35

Madrid afghan is made up of squares that look like Spanish tile.
WORKBASKET Sep 1982 (v.47#10) pg. 18

Easy crocheted afghans composed of ambre-striped squares.
WORKBASKET Sep 1982 (v.47#10) pg. 20

Checquers afghan worked in a smocked afghan stitch.
WORKBASKET Oct 1982 (v.48#1) pg. 6

Mosaic panel afghan make of 6 panels of diamonds and borders. Finished size: 45"x64".
WORKBASKET Feb 1983 (v.48#4) pg. 90

Fruit medley afghan. Twelve squares, each featuring a different fruit shape applique, are sewn together to form a 52"x72" crocheted afghan.
WORKBASKET Mar 1983 (v.48#5) pg. 7

Crochet a striped popcorn afghan.
WORKBASKET Mar 1983 (v.48#5) pg. 31, 55

Large daisy patterns decorate this afghan and matching pillow.
WORKBASKET Apr 1983 (v.48#6) pg. 9, 11

"Recession" afghan uses leftover 4 ply worsted weight yarn from other projects.
WORKBASKET May 1983 (v.48#7) pg. 28

Cat's meow afghan. Crocheted afghan features mischievous cats playing with a ball of yarn. Measures 45"x63". Instructions for matching pillow included.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1983 (v.48#8) pg. 12

Trellis afghan has an "Indian" look. Worked in single and double crochet.
WORKBASKET Sep 1983 (v.48#10) pg. 16

Hairpin lace afghan measures 38"x64".
WORKBASKET Oct 1983 (v.49#1) pg. 10

Crocheted afghan and matching pillow with a strawberry pattern embroidered in cross stitch.
WORKBASKET Jan 1984 (v.49#3) pg. Cover, 6

Crocheted baby afghan in contrasting colors. Measures 32"x35" without the fringe. Included are instructions to make a Humpty Dumpty rattle.
WORKBASKET Feb 1984 (v.49#4) pg. 8

Crocheted heirloom afghan with diamond design. Measures 48"x72" without the fringe.
WORKBASKET Feb 1984 (v.49#4) pg. 14

Crocheted two color baby afghan is worked in shells and chains.
WORKBASKET Feb 1984 (v.49#4) pg. 58

Crochet a casual plaid afghan. Measures 57"x59" without the fringe.
WORKBASKET Feb 1984 (v.49#4) pg. 66

Crochet an afghan with a reversible "bubble" or popcorn texture. Measures 50"x60" without fringe.
WORKBASKET Apr 1984 (v.49#6) pg. 8

Crochet a complete outfit for baby. Included are a sweater, pants, a hat and an afghan appliqued with flowers.
WORKBASKET Apr 1984 (v.49#6) pg. 34

Crochet a baby afghan which measures 38"x50".
WORKBASKET Aug 1984 (v.49#9) pg. Cover, 6

Crochet and stencil afghan. Measures 54"x72".
WORKBASKET Oct 1984 (v.50#1) pg. Cover, 9

Crochet an afghan with a stripe pattern. Measures 50"x58" without the fringe.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1984 (v.50#2) pg. 17

Crochet a 70"x52" afghan with matching roll pillow and a square pillow. Worked in single-chain stitch with a diagonal pattern of double chains every 14 stitches.
WORKBASKET Jan 1985 (v.50#3) pg. 10

Pineapple panel afghan in crochet measures 56"x66".
WORKBASKET Feb 1985 (v.50#4) pg. 26

Lace boudoir afghan, 47"x67", is crocheted in floral squares.
WORKBASKET Mar 1985 (v.50#5) pg. 12

"On the Move" afghan is crocheted in squares. Measures 48"x60".
WORKBASKET Mar 1985 (v.50#5) pg. 60

"Stained Glass" afghan, 52"x56", is crocheted in an openwork stitch.
WORKBASKET Apr 1985 (v.50#6) pg. Cover, 6

Sampler afghan is made from blocks worked in box and seed stitches, alternating with strips worked in the popcorn stitch.
WORKBASKET May 1985 (v.50#7) pg. 20

Grandmother's Flower Garden afghan is made from 583 hexagons whip-stitched together.
WORKBASKET Aug 1985 (v.50#9) pg. 34

Diamond-shaped granny-square afghan to crochet. Measures 57"x63".
WORKBASKET Sep 1985 (v.50#10) pg. 30

"Farm-Fresh" afghan has 12" square crocheted blocks embroidered with hen, chick and rooster designs. Contrasting border is crocheted in a V-stitch. One square is used to make a matching pillow.
WORKBASKET Oct 1985 (v.51#1) pg. 34

Crocheted afghan with colorful stripes measures 46"x64", plus fringe. Ribbons of crochet are worked separately and woven through the solid-colored background.
WORKBASKET Feb 1986 (v.51#4) pg. 7

Crocheted afghan and pillow with dresden-plate quilt pattern appliques in the center of each 15" square block.
WORKBASKET Mar 1986 (v.51#5) pg. 48

Afghan and matching pillow are worked in single crochet and accented with tri-color stripes.
WORKBASKET April 1986 (v.51#6) pg. 10

Tri-color striped afghan, worked all in single-chain crochet, is given a smocked look by drawing up the stripes with bead accents.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1986 (v.51#8) pg. 18

"Remembrance of Spring" afghan has a center panel worked in front- and back-post double crochet. This panel is edged with a floral border. Crocheted flowers, butterflies and a bow are appliqued on the center panel, with flower stems chained on the surface. Finished afghan measures 36"x41". For intermediate crocheters.
WORKBASKET Aug 1986 (v.51#9) pg. 30

Ribbed afghan worked in double crochet has a shell edging. A ribbon is woven along each side and tied in bows at each corner. Finished afghan measures 45"x56".
WORKBASKET Sep 1986 (v.51#10) pg. 10

"Strike It Rich" diamond-pattern crocheted afghan.
WORKBASKET Oct 1986 (v.52#1) pg. 10

Single-crochet squares, embroidered with forget-me-knots, are joined together in various ways to make an afghan, a pillow and a little girl's pullover sweater.
WORKBASKET Feb 1987 (v.52#4) pg. 48

Shells-and-chains crocheted afghan.
WORKBASKET Mar 1987 (v.52#5) pg. 32

Ridged afghan is crocheted in the afghan stitch with variations to produce ribbing. Finished size: 38"x60". Intermediate skill level.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1987 (v.52#8) pg. 12

"Raised Arrow" reversible afghan, 35"x84", is crocheted in a two-color pattern stitch. Rated as "easy."
WORKBASKET Mar 1988 (v.53#5) pg. 24

"Roses & Ribbons" afghan, 34"x55", is crocheted in a pattern stitch and appliqued with crocheted roses and a bow.
WORKBASKET Mar 1988 (v.53#5) pg. 49

"Wagon Wheels" afghan, 45" square, is worked in double crochet in blocks. Each of the nine blocks has a wheel motif in the center. Intermediate skill level.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1988 (v.53#8) pg. 34

"Sailboat" afghan, 38"x48", is crocheted in afghan stitch. A charted pattern is used to crochet the large multi-colored sailboat motif. Easy skill level.
WORKBASKET Aug 1988 (v.53#9) pg. 12

Crocheted afghan, 44"x48", and matching pillow cover, 15"x13", plus fringe.
WORKBASKET Sep 1988 (v.53#10) pg. 22

"Garden Path" crocheted cobblestone-pattern afghan and matching pillow cover. Easy skill level.
WORKBASKET Oct 1988 (v.54#1) pg. 40

"Christmas Tree" afghan, 45"x72", is crocheted in afghan stitch. It is made up of three rows of five blocks each. Alternating blocks contain colorful Christmas tree motifs. Easy skill level.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1988 (v.54#2) pg. 18

Contemporary granny-square crocheted afghan, 54"x70". Easy skill level.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1988 (v.54#2) pg. 48

Lacy afghan and pillow set. Afghan measures 40"x56" and is crocheted in a lacy pattern stitch and laced with ribbon. Pillow, 13"x16", in openwork crochet has a ruffled border and horizontal rows of popcorns and interlaced ribbon on the front. For intermediate-skill crocheters.
WORKBASKET Jan 1989 (v.54#3) pg. 26

"Heart" afghan, worked in single-chain crochet, features a red-on-white lattice motif with four hearts in each panel. The border of this 48"x70" afghan has a row of white-on-red hearts. An easy project.
WORKBASKET Feb 1989 (v.54#4) pg. 20

"Fourth of July" crocheted afghan, 47"x67", is made up of individual hexagons with stars in the center. Easy project.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1989 (v.54#8) pg. 18

"Rosebud" afghan, 46"x58", is made up of crocheted 6" squares. Every other square features a ring of tiny rosebuds. Intermediate skill level.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1989 (v.54#8) pg. 20

Easy-to-crochet afghan (56"x43") features a diamond pattern and Southwestern colors.
WORKBASKET Jan 1990 (v.55#3) pg. 16

Decorative crocheted lap throws (39"x44"). Two embroidery designs are given, a Norwegian tree border and a Swedish-weave starburst.
WORKBASKET May 1990 (v.55#7) pg. 20

Crocheted Christmas afghan (42"x58") in white features a cross stitch border of green and red geometric designs.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1990 (v.55#8) pg. 24

Crocheted afghan (45"x58") features a majestic mastodon motif. Experienced skill level.
WORKBASKET Aug 1990 (v.55#9) pg. 16

Crocheted medallion afghan features a center whirligig panel surrounded by strip in leaf and chain motifs.
WORKBASKET Sep 1990 (v.55#10) pg. 18

Patchwork leaf afghan (45"x60") is crocheted in five strips and joined with four seams. Features alternating blocks of solid color and blocks with embroidered fall leaf motifs surrounded with a solid-color border.
WORKBASKET Oct 1990 (v.56#1) pg. 26

Bright afghan (45"x64") is crocheted in thermal stitch.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1991 (v.56#3) pg. 22

Easy, one-color afghan (42"x60") is crocheted in a simple pattern stitch with diagonal rows of puff stitches.
WORKBASKET Apr-May 1991 (v.56#4) pg. 18

Argyle-style afghan crocheted in three colors.
WORKBASKET Aug-Sep 1991 (v.56#6) pg. 28

Twist-stitch crocheted afghan (60"x45").
WORKBASKET Oct-Nov 1991 (v.57#1) pg. 20

Garden Maze afghan to crochet. Twenty squares (10"x11") are knitted in two colors with a center rectangle and lines from corners of inner rectangle to outer corners of the squares. Border rectangles carry the angled motifs. Finished afghan has a quilt-like appearance.
WORKBASKET Dec 1991-Jan 1992 (v.57#2) pg. 20

Indian-design afghan (46"x64") and rug (24"x32") to crochet. Both are worked in afghan stitch in natural yarn. Red, blue and brown motifs are embroidered on the finished pieces.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1992 (v.57#3) pg. 26

Christmas afghan (48"x60") to work in single-crochet 12" squares. Solid color squares alternate with charted squares that have wreath motifs.
WORKBASKET Oct-Nov 1992 (v.58#1) pg. 22

Parfait afghan (38"x70") crocheted in stripes.
WORKBASKET Dec 1992-Jan 1993 (v.58#2) pg. 17

Hearts and Flowers afghan (46"x58") is worked in panels with granny squares, filet crochet and a lacy shell border.
WORKBASKET Apr-May 1993 (v.58#4) pg. 70

Christmas Tree afghan (57"x63") to crochet is made up of 3"x3" squares. It has a Christmas tree motif in the center and multicolored border with stripes and half-circles.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1993 (v.58#5) pg. 44

Stadium blanket (42"x56") is crocheted in wide zigzags of school colors.
WORKBASKET Aug-Sep 1993 (v.58#6) pg. 38

Crocheted afghan (49"x60") is worked in strips and features a checkerboard and diamond pattern.
WORKBASKET Apr-May 1994 (v.59#4) pg. 14

Seascape afghan (40"x55") is crocheted in shell stitch and shades of blue and green to give the appearance of rippling ocean waves.
WORKBASKET Jun-Jul 1994 (v.59#5) pg. 52

Crocheted Sunday afternoon afghan (46"x66") combines single crochet with texture-adding picot stitch.
WORKBASKET Apr-May 1995 (v.60#4) pg. 56

Crocheted popcorn afghan (58"x45").
WORKBASKET Oct-Nov 1995 (v.61#1) pg. 48

Heart afghan to crochet. Red squares have white ruffled heart motifs in the center of each one. The afghan requires 39 heart squares and 16 smaller squares without hearts.
WORKBASKET Dec 1995-Jan 1996 (v.61#2) pg. 42

Olympic Rings afghan is made of nine crocheted rectangles, five of which have sets of interlocking Olympic rings. The border features stripes in the five Olympic colors.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1996 (v.61#3) pg. 14

Granny square American flag afghan (52"x64"). Finished squares in red, white and blue are sewn together in a flag shape. Crocheted white stars are sewn on the blue field. The afghan is edged in a single row of gold.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1996 (v.61#3) pg. 30

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- HALTON MAYFLY entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- HALTON MAYFLY
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

Halton MAYFLY. Three-view drawing and technical data on the Halton H.A.C. 1, a two-seater sports biplane built by apprentices at RAF Halton Technical Training School in 1926.
AERO MODELLER #771 Jan 2000 (v.65) pg. 6

AFGHAN -- KNITTED entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AFGHAN -- KNITTED
xx   AFGHAN
xx   KNITTING

Garter-stitch afghan bordered with striped ribbing is worked on large needles. Afghan is 55"x67".
AMERICAN HOME CRAFTS Spring-Summer 1978 (v.6#2) pg. 63, 99

Peacock Plaid mohair-like afghan is knitted with a center square and striped edges.
AMERICAN HOME CRAFTS Fall 1978 (v.6#4) pg. 54, 96

Instructions for knitting a domino afghan.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Dec 1972 (v.50#12) pg. 66

Photo shows how to make a quilt-patterned throw from scrap yarn knitted into squares. Knitting instructions for squares are given. Est. cost: $17.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1976 (v.54#7) pg. 94

Patchwork afghan, 64"x88", is made from 35 squares. Some squares are solid colors and others are knitted in six colors.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1978 (v.56#10) pg. 74, 152

Knitted sampler afghan is made up of 48 squares (8"x8") worked with 8 different colors of yarn in 6 different patterns.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1979 (v.57#9) pg. 54, 144

Knit-as-you-go patchwork afghan. Squares are a combination of solids, stripes, and Fair Isle patterns.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1981 (v.59#10) pg. 124, 185

"Fisherman" afghan to knit in moss and cable stitches.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Dec 1987 (v.65#12) pg. 102, 159

Warm up America, a project to make afghans to give to the homeless to keep them warm. Knit and crochet patterns for knitting 7"x9" afghan squares.
CRAFTS Sep 1992 (v.15#9) pg. 86

How to make a knitted afghan that is 64"x62".
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1975 (v.5#10) pg. 57

Knitted squares in crayon colors can be assembled into either a hassock or an afghan.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jan-Feb 1980 (v.11#1) pg. 58

Panel afghan is knitted in long patterned strips that are crocheted together and then decorated with cross-stitch stripes.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Oct 1980 (v.11#8) pg. 56

Knit and crochet this intarsia afghan.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Mar 1981 (v.12#2) pg. 60

Knit and weave a ribbon blanket in two sizes, afghan and baby carriage.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Apr 1981 (v.12#3) pg. 59

Knit a plaid afghan and a plaid-point pillow.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1981 (v.12#7) pg. 62

Embroidered wildflower afghan features bouquets of brilliant orange, red, yellow and blue blooms in easy crewel stitches, outlined by the knitted diamond cable pattern on reverse stockinette background.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1982 (v.13#4) pg. 44

Knitted "woven" afghan uses big, hollow knitting needles into which other colors of yarn are threaded, and the weaving is accomplished while you knit plain garter stitch.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jul-Aug 1982 (v.13#6) pg. 90

Wave-patterned afghan is knitted in strips.
FAMILY CIRCLE Feb 1 1979 (v.92#2) pg. 57, 104

Rainbow afghan knitted in garter stitch.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 5 1979 (v.92#8) pg. 88

Knitted afghan worked in both stockinette and garter stitch.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 1 1979 (v.92#15) pg. 95, 152

Knitted patchwork afghan adapted from Sunburst design.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 20 1979 (v.92#16) pg. 96, 166

Ladybug afghan is knitted in red and white stripes with rows of red and black ladybugs on the white stripes.
FAMILY CIRCLE Mar 11 1980 (v.93#4) pg. 83, 158

Honeycomb knitted afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 1 1980 (v.93#15) pg. 67, 126

Knitted floral afghan designed by Rosemary Drysdale.
FAMILY CIRCLE Feb 3 1981 (v.94#2) pg. 56

Knit-a-Patch afghan with bold geometric motifs and sunshine-yellow background. It is made with the speedy garter stitch, one patch at a time. Measures 40"x60".
FAMILY CIRCLE Jul 1 1981 (v.94#9) pg. 74

The country look. Knitted afghan with red schoolhouse design is done in stockinette stitch, with cross-stitched design and crocheted border.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jul 21 1981 (v.94#10) pg. 71, 128

Geometric design knitted afghan features bold, bright colors. Measures 42"x58".
FAMILY CIRCLE Aug 11 1981 (v.94#11) pg. 82, 116

The world of Irish knits. Includes instructions for two afghans, four pillows and a triangular shawl requiring only 4 major stitch patterns (cable, diamond cable, seed and trinity). Includes basic how-to-knit information.
FAMILY CIRCLE Sep 22 1981 (v.94#13) pg. 102

Quick-to-knit afghan and shawl uses extra large needles and craft-and-rug yarn.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 24 1981 (v.94#16) pg. 122, 143

Basic garter stitch knitting projects. (1) Afghan. (2) Pillows. (3) Basket stiffened with plastic canvas. (4) Tumbler covers. (5) Wall hangings show basket of flowers and basket of fruit.
FAMILY CIRCLE Feb 23 1982 (v.95#3) pg. 90, 120

Cable-knit baby afghan.
FAMILY CIRCLE May 31 1983 (v.96#8) pg. 100

Knitted argyle lap robe. Measures 38"x48". Est. cost: $13.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 23 1984 (v.97#15) pg. 115, 184

American Beauty rose afghan (48"x48") is knitted in stockinette stitch. It features an openwork outline of a rose in the center, a band of seed stitch around the border and a lace edging.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Jun-Jul 1996 (v.40#3) pg. 38
Correction FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Aug-Sep 1996 (v.40#4) pg. 4

Diamond afghan (49"x60") is knitted in squares that form dark squares within lighter squares against a heather background.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] May-Jun 1998 (v.42#3) pg. 36

Summertime afghan to knit with garter-stitch border and a large watermelon design with embroidered seeds. Measures 48"x62".
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Jul 1982 (v.195#1) pg. 128, 212

Summer afternoon afghan and pillow to knit is decorated with stenciled flowers.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Aug 1984 (v.199#2) pg. 149, 238

Country cottage afghan (40"x64") and matching 16" sq. pillow to knit.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Nov 1984 (v.199#5) pg. 185, 262

Bridgehampton square afghan.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Fall 1980-Winter 1981 pg. 102, 150

Afghan made from squares of machine knitted patterns.
HANDMADE Spring 1982 (v.2#1) pg. 18
Added Info HANDMADE Summer 1982 (v.2#2) pg. 114

Striped Navajo afghan in stockinette stitch.
HANDMADE Fall 1982 (v.2#3) pg. 102, 124

Lace knit afghan. Four bands of openwork and seed stitch border each side of a wide seeded diamond center panel. Dimensions: 64"x72" plus fringe.
HANDMADE #9 Summer 1983 (v.3#2) pg. 35, 55

Simple afghan knitted in three colors of yarn in garter stitch with diamond shaped patterns.
HANDMADE #12 Jan-Feb 1984 pg. 99, 79

Afghan in traditional cable design and diagonal stripes. Ends are knotted and fringed.
HANDMADE #13 Mar-Apr 1984 pg. 45, 61

Cable stitch afghan, 45"x70", has bands of color separating areas of garter stitch and cable. Ends are fringed.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Fall-Winter 1978 (v.9#1) pg. 56, 99

Cable pattern afghan knitted in mohair.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Spring-Summer 1979 (v.9#2) pg. 92, 120

Lacy afghan knitted in mohair.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Spring-Summer 1979 (v.9#2) pg. 93, 120

Magic Carpet afghan resembles an oriental antique.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Fall-Winter 1979 (v.10#1) pg. 71, 109

Machine-knitted afghan based on a 17th century Swedish pattern.
LADIES HOME JOURNAL NEEDLE & CRAFT Spring-Summer 1980 (v.10#2) pg. 93, 123

Roses and checks "quilt" (54"x64") is made by joining machine-knit squares (blocks). Edging is worked in shell crochet.
MACHINE KNITTERS SOURCE #36 May-Jun 1990 (v.6) pg. 42

Bridal afghan is knitted in a pointelle leaf pattern and woven with ribbon for accents.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1979 (v.24#1) pg. 76, 70

Fluffy garter stitch afghan with crocheted shell edging.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1979 (v.24#1) pg. 87, 62

Afghan is knitted in reverse stockinette with a raised, diamond-shaped, lattice pattern. Crocheted flowers and leaves are sewn on.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1980 (v.25#1) pg. 140, 44

Knitted afghan is covered with giant snowflakes. Finished size: 33x45".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Nov-Dec 1981 (v.26#6) pg. 38, 84

Carriage blanket and matching pillow are knit in Fair Isle patterns. Blanket is knit on a circular needle for double thickness.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jul-Aug 1982 (v.27#4) pg. 78, 116

Sampler afghan measuring 58"x65" features a different embroidered design in every other square (checkerboard style).
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan-Feb 1983 (v.28#1) pg. 39, 142

Fir tree afghan. Green and white snow-touched trees form the center panel. Red and white forms the snowflake border. Worked in mosaic knitting. Not a project for beginners. Measures 42"x58".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Sep-Oct 1983 (v.28#5) pg. 91, 24

Knitted afghan is made a square at a time. Each 8" square features a flower motif.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1984 (v.29#2) pg. 80, 108

Four Christmas afghans to make as wall hangings. Two of them show Santa and his reindeer. One is a large Santa head and one is a Christmas tree.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1984 (v.29#5) pg. 84, 114, 118, 120, 121

Tri-color, chevron-pattern afghan to knit or crochet.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1985 (v.30#4) pg. 68, 22, 109

"Buffalo plaid" knitted afghan with polar bears and pine trees embroidered on the border. Measures 52"x70".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1985 (v.30#5) pg. 79, 50

"Holly" afghan is knitted with alternating panels of stockinette stitch, garter stitch and Guernsey pattern stitches, each separated by cables. Intarsia holly leaves and knot-stitch berries are worked on the stockinette-stitch panels. Afghan measures 48"x50".
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1987 (v.32#5) pg. 89, 26

"Embossed Bouquet" afghan, 52"x64", is knitted in stockinette stitch. The "ribbon-and-bows" border and floral spray in the center have a damask-like effect created with knit and purl stitches.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 39, 72

"Rose Garden" throw, 48"x60", has panels knitted in stockinette alternating with lacy strips of cables and pointelle. Roses and rosebuds are embroidered in the stockinette panels using duplicate stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 41, 75

"Diamond stripe" afghan, 46"x62", is knitted in stockinette and bordered with bands of seed stitch. It features an all-over motif of intarsia diamonds and narrow stripes.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jan 1988 (v.33#1) pg. 46, 70

"Ripple" afghan, 48"x60", is knitted in two colors for a chevron effect. The points on each end are tasseled.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1988 (v.33#2) pg. 72, 26

"Delft Porcelain" afghan, 46"x57", is knitted in stockinette stitch and features a border of tulip and windmill motifs.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1988 (v.33#3) pg. 76, 107

Knitted "guernsey" afghan, 48"x61", features panels of checks and zigzags.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1988 (v.33#4) pg. 45, 6

"Rosebud" throw, 51"x64", is knitted in panels with bobbles and cables. Vines and leaves are embroidered.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1988 (v.33#5) pg. 60, 14

Knitted afghan features large panels in a textured pattern stitch. When assembled, two of the five panels are reversed to create a two-pattern effect. This 58"x60" throw is edged with garter stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1989 (v.34#1) pg. 71, 12

Navaho-motif afghan, 50"x56", is knitted in stockinette stitch with a border in seed stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1989 (v.34#4) pg. 57, 87

"Spruces and Stripes" afghan, 57"x64", is knitted in seed-stitch and stockinette stitch. It features spruce tree, and flag motifs.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1989 (v.34#6) pg. 64, 80

Knitted afghan (48"x62") is worked on large (#35) needles and can be completed in one weekend.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1990 (v.35#1) pg. 66, 109
Correction McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Jun 1990 (v.35#3) pg. 29

Machine-knit afghan (51"x60") features fleur-de-lis motifs, regal red borders and handsome tassels at the corners.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1990 (v.35#5) pg. 65, 95

Machine-knit afghan (70"x75") features eyelet diamonds, faux-braid edging and embroidered flowers.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1991 (v.36#1) pg. 59, 83

Tulip afghan (46"x60"), knitted in stockinette stitch, combines fair-isle checked borders and intarsia techniques for diamond and tulip motifs.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1991 (v.37#1) pg. 43, 70

Folkloric afghan (46"x70") in stockinette stitch has eyelet motifs in the center and rows of eyelet between zigzags of color. All four sides are edged in seed stitch. Stylized trees are added in duplicate stitch embroidery.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1991 (v.37#5) pg. 66, 74

Misty Berries afghan (54"x67") is an variation of Aran knitting with a bobble-and-cable pattern.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Oct 1991 (v.37#5) pg. 66, 78

Indian stitch afghan (54"x72") to knit features a method of wrapping yarn to make long stitches. Four complementary shades of brown, separated by off-white, create horizontal rows of zigzag. The border is worked in garter stitch.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1991 (v.37#6) pg. 42, 44

Aran knitted afghan (49"x56") has a diamond center panel and checkerboard motif side panels.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1991 (v.37#6) pg. 43, 44

Intricately knitted Meadow afghan (54"x54") features rows of leaf motifs that are raised to create a sculptural quality. Rated for expert knitters.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Feb 1992 (v.38#1) pg. 38, 40

Knit a rainbow-rippled afghan to fit a bed.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #85 Jan-Feb 1984 pg. 38, 43
Correction MOTHER EARTH NEWS #86 Mar-Apr 1984 pg. 8

Doubled Diamond Eyelet Afghan knitted in three colors.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Sep-Oct 1981 (v.4#5) pg. 19

A four-harness, four-block, Summer and Winter lap blanket. (40"x40").
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #57 Winter 1983 (v.15#1) pg. 24

Baby blanket from the New York City Spinning Guild is knitted in squares and edged with Frisby Lace. Includes tips for making afghans from knitted squares.
SPIN-OFF Winter 1993 (v.17#4) pg. 72, 74

Lacy mohair afghan knitted from homespun yarn.
SPIN-OFF Winter 1993 (v.17#4) pg. 77, 78

Merino afghan is knitted from handspun yarn in the Old Shale stitch.
SPIN-OFF Winter 1993 (v.17#4) pg. 81

Textured afghan, knitted from odds and ends of handspun yarn, is worked lengthwise in garter stitch, with a different yarn used for each row.
SPIN-OFF Winter 1993 (v.17#4) pg. 82, 85

Sopisticated afghan is knitted in garter and stockinette in black with ombre accents. Measures 50"x65".
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 1 1979 (v.43#2) pg. 79, 134

Cabled afghan.
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 4 1980 (v.44#2) pg. 89, 142

Baby afghan is made from six strips of garter-stitch pastel squares.
WOMAN'S DAY Aug 11 1981 (v.44#13) pg. 77, 133

Afghan, pillow and rug utilize Irish knitting techniques.
WOMAN'S DAY Oct 13 1981 (v.45#1) pg. 64, 136

Ravishing Rainbow knitted afghan is made all in one piece using a circular needle. Dimensions: 63"x80".
WOMAN'S DAY Jan 12 1982 (v.45#5) pg. 74, 99

Tasseled hexagon afghan assembled from six-sided modules which you knit on four needles in seven rounds of color.
WOMAN'S DAY Aug 10 1982 (v.45#13) pg. 80, 118

Airy afghan is knit in gauzy strips of color in stockinette stitch, then fringed.
WOMAN'S DAY Oct 25 1983 (v.47#2) pg. 67, 164

Knit a cabled afghan in long separate panels in a trellis pattern featuring two different cables and a seed-stitch border.
WOMAN'S DAY Sep 11 1984 (v.47#15) pg. 32, 122

Knit a plaid mohair afghan in stockinette stitch. Measures 46"x56".
WOMAN'S DAY Oct 23 1984 (v.48#2) pg. 91, 181

Knitted afghan is worked in alternating solid and ombre blocks.
WORKBASKET Mar 1979 (v.44#6) pg. 6

Lacy afghan knitted in a 4 color chevron pattern.
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1979 (v.45#2) pg. 65

Decorator afghan to knit in striped panels.
WORKBASKET Aug 1981 (v.46#9) pg. 38

Checks and squares afghan.
WORKBASKET Sep 1981 (v.46#10) pg. 56

Pinwheel afghan is worked in garter stitch with a crocheted border.
WORKBASKET Feb 1982 (v.47#4) pg. 54

Garter stitch afghan with rows of concentric circles.
WORKBASKET Mar 1982 (v.47#5) pg. 12

Knitted seashell pattern afghan.
WORKBASKET Aug 1982 (v.47#9) pg. 8

Fisherman knit afghan, 50"x60", is made up of seven separate panels, three of them worked in triple braid cables.
WORKBASKET Sep 1982 (v.47#10) pg. 6

Openwork panel afghan knitted in two colors.
WORKBASKET Mar 1983 (v.48#5) pg. 61

Ripple afghan is knitted in garter stitch. Measures 46"x68".
WORKBASKET Jan 1985 (v.50#3) pg. 39, 42

Striped three-color afghan is knitted in stockinette.
WORKBASKET Feb 1985 (v.50#4) pg. 82

Zigzag-and-stripe stadium blanket knitted in stockinette stitch. Measures 48"x52".
WORKBASKET Oct 1985 (v.51#1) pg. 14

Afghan, knitted in a hexagon pattern, has a mosaic or stained-glass appearance. Horizontal rows of hexagon shapes create framed windows of color. For intermediate-skill knitters.
WORKBASKET Jan 1989 (v.54#3) pg. 34

"Sailor's Cabled Afghan," 45"x60", features cable strips knitted separately and then sewn onto stripes of stockinette. Intermediate skill level.
WORKBASKET Feb 1989 (v.54#4) pg. 34

Knitted lap afghan, 44"x56", is worked in alternate rows of stockinette and reverse stockinette which are cross-hatched with an open-chain motif.
WORKBASKET Sep 1989 (v.54#10) pg. 30

Lap throw (40"x49") is knitted in alternating panels of shell and gull stitches.
WORKBASKET Feb 1990 (v.55#4) pg. 18

"Fisherman" afghan is knitted in panels of cables and popcorn patterns which are then sewn together. Intermediate skill level.
WORKBASKET Mar 1990 (v.55#5) pg. 20

Fisherman afghan (38"x56") and matching pillows (tube, square and round) are knit in a combination of six pattern stitches (seed, rope, reverse stockinette, double cable, popcorn and honeycomb).
WORKBASKET Nov-Dec 1990 (v.56#2) pg. 14

Dishcloth afghan. Easy-to-knit dishcloth squares, worked from corner to corner, are joined together and laced with doubled yarn. Crocheted flowers are attached at each junction of four squares.
WORKBASKET Aug-Sep 1991 (v.56#6) pg. 22

Fireside shadow afghan (48"x52") is knitted in vertical panels of Vs, separated by narrow openwork stitches.
WORKBASKET Dec 1992-Jan 1993 (v.58#2) pg. 16

Shades and textures give this super-simple knit afghan (42"x66") a classy look. The afghan is knit (stockinette stitch) in strips and the pattern consists of three rows that are repeated until a desired length is reached.
WORKBASKET Dec 1993-Jan 1994 (v.59#2) pg. 34

Knit afghan (52"x82") is worked in 24 individual squares and forms a bold, geometric design of triangles. Good for beginners.
WORKBASKET Apr-May 1994 (v.59#4) pg. 17

Knitted lap afghan (40"x42") uses seed stitch, reverse stockinette stitch, simple seed stitch, and V-stitch.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1995 (v.60#3) pg. 26

"Hearts Afire" afghan (51"x56") is knitted in panels with raised hearts.
WORKBASKET Dec 1995-Jan 1996 (v.61#2) pg. 46

AFGHAN -- WOVEN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AFGHAN -- WOVEN
xx   AFGHAN
xx   WEAVING

Afghan is made up of 120 squares that have been woven on a child's potholder loom. Beginner project.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1988 (v.66#1) pg. 32

Updated version of "The most popular afghan ever". The 1970 daisy afghan is updated in thoroughly modern shades of boysenberry and raspberry cream in a softer, fluffier yarn. Measures 52"x74".
FAMILY CIRCLE Sep 1 1982 (v.95#12) pg. 91, 119

A plaid afghan to weave. Instructions for 36" or 45" widths. Finished length of either width is 72". Requires a 4-harness loom.
HANDWOVEN Fall-Winter 1979 (v.1#1) pg. 40

A 2/2 twill throw. Instructions given for both 22.5" and 45" 4-harness looms.
HANDWOVEN Fall-Winter 1980 (v.2#1) pg. 65

Plaid "Sherbet" throw, 52"x90", is woven on two harnesses.
HANDWOVEN Sep 1981 (v.2#4) pg. 52

How to produce handspun variegated yarns that simulate ikat when woven. Includes instructions for spinning and weaving a lap robe and a vest, a shrug and a bog jacket.
HANDWOVEN Sep 1981 (v.2#4) pg. 65

Bronson lace weave afghan.
HANDWOVEN Mar 1982 (v.3#2) pg. 59, 88

Contemporary overshot afghan in "Nappy's Butterflies" pattern.
HANDWOVEN May 1982 (v.3#3) pg. 29, 89

"Log Cabin" pattern afghan.
HANDWOVEN May 1982 (v.3#3) pg. 29, 88

"Country Casual" wool afghan is a bold plaid.
HANDWOVEN May 1982 (v.3#3) pg. 29, 88

Two warm, wooly twill blankets (throws) to weave in plaid.
HANDWOVEN Sep 1982 (v.3#4) pg. 34, 82

Luxurious brushed wool/mohair handwoven throw. Measures 42"x76" excluding fringe.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1983 (v.4#4) pg. 59, 102

Boucle throw is handwoven in a twill weave structure. Measures 42"x76" plus fringe.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1983 (v.4#4) pg. 62, 108

Simple, large-scale plaid afghan is an ideal project for the beginning weaver. The 2-shaft plain weave can be done on a rigid heddle loom. Measures 35"x56" plus 8" fringe.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1983 (v.4#5) pg. 53, 106

Weave a traditional afghan in the MacCallum tartan sett.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1983 (v.4#5) pg. 96

Beechwood throw. Deeply textured weave with braided ends.
HANDWOVEN Mar-Apr 1984 (v.5#2) pg. 58, 97

Shades of Fall all-wool lap robe. Woven in 2/2 twill.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1984 (v.5#4) pg. 71, 106

Weave an afghan in simple plain weave on a four shaft loom.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1985 (v.6#1) pg. Cover, I-4

Weave a wool wrap-up throw in plain weave on a two or four shaft loom.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1985 (v.6#1) pg. 63, I-3

Make a blanket (throw) in waffle weave on a four shaft loom.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1985 (v.6#5) pg. 54, I-13

Weave a plaid afghan in 2/2 twill on a four shaft loom.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1985 (v.6#5) pg. 58

Weave a striped wool and mohair afghan in 2/2 twill on a four shaft loom.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1985 (v.6#5) pg. 59

Cotton lap robe, 34"x46", is woven in an eight-harness pattern with blocks of warp and weft floats. Wide hems and hemstitching give it a tailored look.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1986 (v.7#1) pg. 42, I-5

"Cloud and Sky" brushed afghan, 40"x80", is woven in a four-harness 2/2 twill. It features a big plaid motif and plied fringe finish. The afghan described was sent to a commercial brushing service which produced its furry knapp.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1986 (v.7#1) pg. 44, I-7

Fireside throw and matching pillow are designed to be woven on a narrow loom. A 16" wide warp is used. Stripes in colors and novelty yarns accent the plain-weave fabric. No attempt is made to match the stripes when the separate panels are joined to make a 41" wide throw. An accompanying article gives design suggestions on making wide cloth from narrow panels. The plain-weave pillow is accented by a striped band on one end.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1987 (v.8#1) pg. 72, I-13

Striped pastel throw and coordinated plaid pillow.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1987 (v.8#1) pg. 74, I-15

Lap robe is woven in two-block monk's belt design.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1987 (v.8#5) pg. 56, I-14

"Rainbow" throw, 46"x64", is woven in a warp-emphasis plain weave. The seven warp and weft colors, ranging from rose through purple to blue-green, are mixed visually based on the Fibonacci series to determine the correct proportion of each.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1988 (v.9#4) pg. 22, 92

Carriage blanket, 51"x55", is woven in a two-block, double weave design. Variety and vibranch are gained by crossing the two-color warp (dark rust and black) with several different hues of weft, some of which are greens complementary to the rust.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1988 (v.9#5) pg. 46, 78

Throw (40"x69") is woven in three colors in a two-block twill diaper weave that requires an 8-shaft loom. A 4-shaft version is also furnished.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1990 (v.11#1) pg. 89, 86

Woolen throw (36"x60") is woven in 2/2 twill with weft stripes.
HANDWOVEN May-Jun 1990 (v.11#3) pg. 46, 89

Plaid afghan (36"x66") is woven in a 2/2 herringbone twill.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1990 (v.11#4) pg. 55, 80

Afghan weave designs based on the weave structures of baskets. Drafts for eight patterns are shown. Includes instruction for weaving an afghan (36"x73") in fancy twill with color-and-weave effect.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1990 (v.11#4) pg. 92

Black, white and red plain-weave throw has bold stripes based on the Fibonacci series.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1992 (v.13#1) pg. 47, 82

Color-matched afghan (39"x72") is woven in twill and plain weave on six shafts. A four-shaft alternative draft furnished. Multi-colored stripes are woven in twill.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1993 (v.14#1) pg. 41, 84

"Twenty-five Snowballs" throw (43"x76") is woven in four-harness overshot.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1994 (v.15#1) pg. 51, 92
Correction HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1994 (v.15#4) pg. 82

Honeycomb revisited. An explanation of the weave's structure and directions for weaving a "Cloud-Soft Throw." Woven in two-block double-faced honeycomb, the reversible throw is 35" wide, 50" long and has 4" fringe at each end.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1995 (v.16#1) pg. 36, 83

"Profusion of Riches" throw, designed to use up small quantities of many colors of yarn. Colors progress from dark on the edges to light in the middle. This 43"x64" throw is woven using color-and-weave effect on an eight-shaft straight twill variation.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1995 (v.16#4) pg. 66, 89

"Topaz Lights" lap robe (31"x 54") is woven in four-shaft lace Bronson.
HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1995 (v.16#5) pg. 28

"Ocean Mist" throw (45"x73") is woven with contrasting stripes of brushed mohair and chenille with a few ends of hand-painted silk ribbon as accent stripes. Plain-weave threading is woven on four shafts to reduce stickiness.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1996 (v.17#1) pg. 28

"Cloud-light" lap robe (35"x52") is woven in plaid plain weave. Each end has a 5" plied fringe. Includes instructions for machine fulling of the lap robe.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1996 (v.17#1) pg. 42, 84

Chenille plaid throw (55"x73") is inspired by traditional tartans and woven in a 2/2 twill.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1996 (v.17#4) pg. 44, 95

Stadium set. Plaid stadium cushion that doubles as a carrying case for a stadium blanket is woven in 2/2/ twill double weave. The front of the cushion reverses the colors of the blanket. Its back and side strips are synthetic leather and it has handwoven handles and a long zipper. The stadium blanket (43"x60") has plied fringe at each end and is woven double width.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1996 (v.17#4) pg. 46, 97

Plaid, featherweight throw (50"x73" plus fringe) is woven double width in Dornick twill.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1997 (v.18#1) pg. 19, 68

Peppermint Tufts throw (53"x64") features mohair tufts on a wool-and-silk background. The plain-weave throw has pattern weft floats and is woven as double-width double weave.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1997 (v.18#4) pg. 68, 85

Winter Wheat afghan (39"x73") is woven in an eight-shaft twill variation with a warp float on the face of the fabric.
HANDWOVEN Mar-Apr 1998 (v.19#2) pg. 59, 82

Bright Pockets afghan (52"x69") is woven on eight shafts in plain weave with squares of colored Ultrasuede tucked into double-weave pockets.
HANDWOVEN May-Jun 1998 (v.19#3) pg. 33, 95

Toasty Toes throw (41"x66") is woven in undulating twill on eight shafts.
HANDWOVEN Sep-Oct 1998 (v.19#4) pg. 46, 76

Plaid paneled throw and lap robe is woven in 2/2 and dornick twill on four shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 54, 71
Correction HANDWOVEN Nov-Dec 1999 (v.20#5) pg. 15

Fiesta chenille throw with boldly colored stripes of varying widths is woven in plain weave on two or four shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 57, 75

Blue plaid lap robe woven in dornick twill on four shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 58, 76

Classic plaid twill throw is woven in double-width double weave in 2/2 twill on eight shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 59, 77

Loopy blue throw combines random-dyed novelty yarns, loops, brushed wool and mohair, woven in plain weave on two or four shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 60, 78

Woodsmoke throw in a large-scale plaid is woven in 2/2 twill on four shafts.
HANDWOVEN Jan-Feb 1999 (v.20#1) pg. 61, 79

"Autumn Glow" plaid throw is woven in a four-shaft twill.
SCANDINAVIAN WEAVING MAGAZINE (VavMagasinet) 3/1989 pg. 20

Four weaves for baby blankets and afghans. (1) Swarthmore check, (2) Rosepath Variation, (3) Small Point Twill, and (4) 8-Harness Twill. Threading and treadling for each included.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #48 Fall 1981 (v.12#4) pg. 50

Use double weaving techniques to produce full-size afghans on small looms.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #57 Winter 1983 (v.15#1) pg. 34

Handwoven afghan or great shawl woven from handspun mohair.
SPIN-OFF Oct 1982 (v.6#4) pg. 57

Project ideas for using odds and ends of yarn. Includes instructions for a woven lap robe and a woven afghan.
SPIN-OFF Spring 1988 (v.12#1) pg. 27

Tweed-like afghan is woven of handspun Gotland fiber. A weaving pattern that alternates between plain weave and twill and five groupings of weft yarns creates the tweed effect. Ends are finished with a plied fringe.
SPIN-OFF Fall 1990 (v.14#3) pg. 82

A handspun afghan (36"x59"). Yarn is spun from Romney/Dorset wool and woven in a 2/2 balanced twill.
SPIN-OFF Spring 1993 (v.17#1) pg. 25

Wooly afghan to weave in Summer and Winter pile techniques.
WEAVER'S JOURNAL #16 Apr 1980 (v.4#4) pg. 14

Large (50"x72") woolen throw woven in an 8-harness combination weave with blocks of plain weave and basket weave.
WEAVER'S JOURNAL #18 Fall 1980 (v.5#2) pg. 14

How to weave three-toned blocks using long-eyed heddles. Includes instructions for a throw woven in three-toned blocks.
WEAVER'S JOURNAL #36 Spring 1985 (v.9#4) pg. 72

AIR CLEANER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR CLEANER
x   AIR FILTER
x   FILTER (AIR)
xx   CLEANING EQUIPMENT
xx   HEATING SYSTEM
xx   SAWDUST COLLECTION SYSTEM

A homemade airborne dust-removal system for the woodworking shop consists of two floor fans, simple plywood cabinet, and furnace filters.
AMERICAN WOODTURNER Jun 1992 (v.7#2) pg. 28
Added Info AMERICAN WOODTURNER Sep 1992 (v.7#3) pg. 32

Shop-built air-filtration system. Plywood box equipped with a blower, a motor and two air filters removes airborne dust by recirculating shop air.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #14 May-Jun 1990 pg. 29
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER #15 Jul-Aug 1990 pg. 4
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER #16 Sep-Oct 1990 pg. 5
Added Info AMERICAN WOODWORKER #18 Jan-Feb 1991 pg. 4

Tip on using an automotive air filter to trap super-fine airborne dust.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #51 Apr 1996 pg. 24

Dealing with sawdust in the workshop. A look at shop vacuums, masks and helmets, dust collectors and ambient air cleaners.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #58 Apr 1997 pg. 72
Correction AMERICAN WOODWORKER #60 Aug 1997 pg. 14

Colored wool streamers at exhaust end of shop air cleaner indicate when filter needs to be cleaned.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #66 Jun 1998 pg. 32

Air scrubber trio. Three shop-made machines that clean the air. (1) A between-the-joists unit with one blower. (2) A hanging unit with double blowers. (3) A benchtop unit with one blower. All three are basically plywood boxes equipped with blowers and filters.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #80 Jun 2000 pg. 42

Modify a vacuum wand to help clean the pleated cloth filters on an air filter.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #89 Oct 2001 pg. 20

Dust alert. Solutions for controlling wood dust in your shop. Includes plans for a shop-built ambient air filter.
CANADIAN HOME WORKSHOP Dec 2000-Jan 2001 (v.24#3) pg. 37, 42

High-efficiency air cleaners for forced-air heating systems.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Sep 1987 (v.10#12) pg. 28

A dust-collecting system that can be built using a scrap blower motor assembly from a forced-air gas furnace. Est. cost: $30.
CHIP CHATS May-Jun 1992 (v.39#3) pg. 24

How to make a lightweight, portable dust collector that has a lot of pickup. Bathroom fan unit is used for the power unit.
CHIP CHATS Mar-Apr 1993 (v.40#2) pg. 76

Tips on installing a Sears Kenmore electronic furnace filter.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #222 Oct 1981 (v.31#8) pg. 10

Tip suggests using an old rectangular box fan and furnace filter for a temporary workshop dust collector.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #343 Nov-Dec 1993 (v.43#10) pg. 6

Tip on washing electronic air filters.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #347 Apr 1994 (v.44#4) pg. 10

Buying a furnace filter. Four varieties compared.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #382 Oct 1997 (v.47#9) pg. 92

Electronic air cleaners. Furnace-mounted units that will scrub a houseful of air. How they work, cost of operation, etc.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #63 Oct-Nov 1990 pg. 58

Tip on using a furnace filter and a room fan to help clear the air of sawdust.
FINE WOODWORKING #81 Mar-Apr 1990 pg. 14

Remove sawdust from your workshop air by combining a squirrel-cage fan with some furnace filters.
FINE WOODWORKING #84 Sep-Oct 1990 pg. 16

Controlling wood dust. Four shop-built devices use cabinets, filters and vacuums for collection. (1) Chip collector cabinet for a portable planer. (2) Air-filtration box. (3) Collection box replaces a conventional drum to facilitate clean out. (4) Mobile stand with intake hood moves from job to job.
FINE WOODWORKING #106 May-Jun 1994 pg. 44
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #108 Sep-Oct 1994 pg. 11

A comparison of three filter systems for a forced-air heating system: medium-efficiency pleated fabric filters, permanent electrostatic filters, and electronic air filters. Other tips to control dust and improve air quality also noted.
HARROWSMITH #87 Sep-Oct 1989 (v.14#3) pg. 108

The clean green machine. Using household plants to fight indoor air pollution. (1) Circulate indoor air through a solarium filled with some of the best plants to filter air. (2) Build a plant-charcoal air filter.
HOME MECHANIX #727 Nov 1988 (v.84) pg. 56
Added Info HOME MECHANIX #734 Jun 1989 (v.85) pg. 8
Added Info HOME MECHANIX #735 Jul 1989 (v.85) pg. 8

A review of various home electrostatic precipitators.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #525 Feb 1972 (v.68) pg. 66

A test of small air cleaners. Results of testing 20 different models, including negative-ion generators.
NEW SHELTER Jul-Aug 1982 (v.3#6) pg. 48

Electronic, high-voltage air cleaner attracts and holds dust particles, smoke, etc., in the air.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1970 (v.32#6) pg. 31

How to install an electronic air cleaner as a part of your existing furnace and a look at what the air cleaner will do for you.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1973 (v.139#3) pg. 146

Installing a supplementary air filter on a forced-air heating or air-conditioning system. This article focuses on modifying the cold-air return duct to make room for either an electronic or media-type filter.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1994 (v.171#6) pg. 86

Tips on choosing electrostatic air cleaners for your home heating plant.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1968 (v.193#2) pg. 152

Electronic air cleaners: What can they do for you?
POPULAR SCIENCE Sep 1972 (v.201#3) pg. 58

A review of high-efficiency furnace or air conditioning filters that trap more dirt. These are non-electronic filters that may only need replacing every 15 months.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1976 (v.209#4) pg. 118

Dust busting. How to control wood dust (airborne sawdust) in a workshop to help prevent health problems.
PRACTICAL HOMEOWNER Nov-Dec 1990 (v.5#8) pg. 14

A plywood box equipped with a furnace filter is hooked up to a sawdust collector and helps filter dust out of the air.
SHOPNOTES #20 Mar 1995 (v.4) pg. 29

Roll-around sanding table and air filter system. This shop-built sanding table pulls in the dust that is produced when sanding. It doubles as an air filter for your shop when not used for sanding. It is equipped with three furnace filters and a squirrel cage blower to pull the air through the filters.
SHOPNOTES #24 Nov 1995 (v.4) pg. 4

Air-filtration cabinet for a woodworking shop. Cabinet (21"x24"x31" high) has a hinged top surface that can serve as an outfeed table. Blower assembly draws air in through a pleated air filter.
WOOD MAGAZINE #55 Oct 1992 (v.9#7) pg. 48
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #60 Apr 1993 (v.10#3) pg. 9

Wall-mounted squirrel-cage furnace fan and in-the-wall air filter create a practical dust control, air cleaner system. ADDED INFO: 09301994.20 p9 ADDED INFO: 09301994.60 p4
WOOD MAGAZINE #63 Sep 1993 (v.10#6) pg. 10
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #68 Feb 1994 (v.11#2) pg. 9
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #73 Oct 1994 (v.11#7) pg. 4

Wood dust and you. Some advice on avoiding and/or controlling airborne dust.
WOOD MAGAZINE #78 Apr 1995 (v.12#3) pg. 4

Air-filtration systems. A comparison test and buyer's guide to five commercially available units ($219-$309).
WOOD MAGAZINE #83 Nov 1995 (v.12#8) pg. 48

Suspending a workshop air filter system from hooks in joists using rubber vacuum cleaner belts dampens noise and vibration.
WOOD MAGAZINE #101 Dec 1997 (v.14#8) pg. 32

Whole-shop air-cleaning system. Combine a squirrel-cage furnace blower with some ductwork and air filters to remove airborne wood dust.
WOOD MAGAZINE #120 Winter 1999 (v.16#9) pg. 70
Correction WOOD MAGAZINE #125 Jul-Aug 2000 (v.17#5) pg. 10
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #135 Sep 2001 (v.18#6) pg. 12

Dust munchers. A test of six air-filtration systems for the workshop.
WOOD MAGAZINE #139 Feb 2002 (v.19#1) pg. 76

Clearing the air. Two inexpensive solutions to clear the air of sawdust in your shop. (1) Heavy-duty shop filter incorporates a squirrel cage blower and pleated furnace filters. (2) Small-area shop filter uses two bathroom exhaust fans and pleated furnace filters.
WOODSMITH #95 Oct 1994 (v.16) pg. 22

Tip on improving the efficiency of airborne sawdust filtering devices used in workshops.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1998 (v.22#2) pg. 8

How to install an electronic air filter in a forced air furnace.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1977 (v.33#2) pg. 84

AIR COMPRESSOR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR COMPRESSOR
sa   AIR HOSE & LINE
sa   AIR TOOL
x   COMPRESSOR (AIR)
xx   AIR PUMP
xx   AIR TOOL
xx   SPRAY PAINTING & FINISHING

Tip on installing a remotely-activated drain on an air compressor tank.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #24 Jan-Feb 1992 pg. 10

Buyer's guide to air compressors.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #48 1996 Tool Buyer's Guide pg. 114

Buyer's guide to air compressors.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #62 1998 Tool Buyer's Guide pg. 32

Buyer's guide to air compressors.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #69 1999 Tool Buyer's Guide pg. 32

Annual buyer's guide to air compressors.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #76 Fall-Winter 1999 pg. 12

How to buy an air compressor
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #83 Fall-Winter 2000 pg. 91

Mobile stand for a small air compresser is fitted with an air hose reel.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #91 Dec 2001 pg. 114

Air compressors in the home workshop. Tips on selection and use.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Dec 1984 (v.8#3) pg. 34

Advice on selecting a compressor for use with pneumatic tools.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Aug 1993 (v.16#11) pg. 8

Air power. Here's what compressed-air tools can do for you and how to buy the air compressor to run them.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #297 Apr 1989 (v.39#4) pg. 84

Tip on rinsing an air compressor tank with auto antifreeze to help prevent internal rusting.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #359 Jun 1995 (v.45#6) pg. 17

Portable air compressors. A primer on supplying air to nailers, staplers, and other air tools.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #49 Oct-Nov 1988 pg. 84

Tip on draining air compressor tanks.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #99 Dec 1995-Jan 1996 pg. 18
Added Info FINE HOMEBUILDING #100 Feb-Mar 1996 pg. 6
Added Info FINE HOMEBUILDING #102 Apr-May 1996 pg. 8

Survey of portable air compressors. Job-site trials assess the quality and performance of 24 compressors designed for trim carpenters.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #113 Dec 1997-Jan 1998 pg. 66

Tip on applying a rustproofing coating to the inside of an air compressor tank.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #126 Oct-Nov 1999 pg. 6

Compressed-air systems. Choosing and using compressors. Advice on installing permanent air lines in the workshop. Tips on selecting a spray gun and accessories.
FINE WOODWORKING #82 May-Jun 1990 pg. 56
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #84 Sep-Oct 1990 pg. 10
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #85 Nov-Dec 1990 pg. 6

Inexpensive airbrush power. Build your own airbrush compressor by combining a battery-powered car tire pump with a seven-gallon air tank and regulator. Est. cost: $50.
FINESCALE MODELER Dec 1999 (v.17#10) pg. 40

How to choose and use an air compressor.
HOME MECHANIX #689 Sep 1985 (v.81) pg. 92

Working on air. Part 1. An evaluation of home air compressors for outdoor use.
HOME MECHANIX #729 Jan 1989 (v.85) pg. 44

Working on air. Part 2. Putting air compressors to use in the home and shop. Some tips.
HOME MECHANIX #730 Feb 1989 (v.85) pg. 74

What you should know about air compressors. Applications and tips for using the little air compressors available today.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO #1 Spring 1976 (v.1#1) pg. 116

A look at the many jobs you can do with an air compressor.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Mar-Apr 1982 (v.7#2) pg. 72

Motor compressor tank and gauge. Est cost: $30.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #423 Aug 1963 (v.59) pg. 86

Junk box air compressor is assembled from a compressor head (a discarded single-cylinder gasoline engine will do), a motor, a pressure tank, and some fittings. (NOTE: Considerable controversy developed over the safety of this unit and are reflected in the added information references).
MODEL AVIATION Nov 1992 (v.18#11) pg. 188
Added Info MODEL AVIATION Dec 1992 (v.18#12) pg. 5
Added Info MODEL AVIATION Jan 1993 (v.19#1) pg. 5
Added Info MODEL AVIATION Feb 1993 (v.19#2) pg. 11
Added Info MODEL AVIATION Mar 1993 (v.19#3) pg. 5, 167
Added Info MODEL AVIATION May 1993 (v.19#5) pg. 36

How to build an air compressor from scrap for less than $60.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #52 Jul-Aug 1978 pg. 165

Small compressor driven by sabre saw delivers more than 50 lbs. pressure.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1965 (v.123#2) pg. 186

Build your own air compressor. Use a 1/3-hp motor, a single-phase compressor, and a propane tank. Est. cost: $24.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1967 (v.127#1) pg. 183

Add an air accumulator (air storage tank) to a diaphragm-type sprayer.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1967 (v.127#6) pg. 157

Build a tank-type air compressor on wheels using an old refrigerator compressor. Features a pressure gauge and automatic pressure shut-off switch. Est. cost: $70.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1972 (v.137#6) pg. 140
Correction POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1973 (v.139#2) pg. 12

Air compressors. An explanation of the piston variations and ratings.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1998 (v.175#2) pg. 94

Rolling carriage for compressor.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1963 (v.182#4) pg. 152

A 30-lb. pressure compressor for less than $10.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1964 (v.184#4) pg. 152

Air power. How to pick the right compressor for your needs.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jan 1977 (v.210#1) pg. 120

A buyers guide to minature air compressors.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1979 (v.214#4) pg. 162

Workshop organization ideas. (1) Wall-mount rack for pipe clamps. (2) Storage for wood cutoffs. (3) Dowel storage. (4) Off-the-floor storage for an air compressor. (5) Overhead storage bins that are raised and lowered using a hand winch. (6) Tilting storage bins for fasteners and small parts.
POPULAR WOODWORKING #42 Apr-May 1988 (v.7#6) pg. 42
Correction POPULAR WOODWORKING #43 Jun 1988 (v.8#1) pg. 54

Build a $200 compressor unit for $50.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS #217 May 1963 (v.34#5) pg. 92

Tip on draining moisture from air compressors into a sink or drain.
SKINNED KNUCKLES #176 Mar 1991 (v.15#8) pg. 18

Schematic for a 24-volt switch with indicator light that is used to activate a 220-volt air compressor via a relay (2-pole contactor).
SKINNED KNUCKLES #200 Mar 1993 (v.17#8) pg. 22

Air compressors. Advice on selecting and equipping a compressor for use in spray painting and driving air tools.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1997 (v.46#2) pg. 114

Tips on checking an air compressor tank for condensation and a working safety valve.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Apr 1995 (v.23#4) pg. 21

Air power. What an air compressor can add to your workshop. Tips on selecting a compressor and which air tools you can use with them.
WOOD MAGAZINE #10 Apr 1986 (v.3#2) pg. 50

Tips on keeping your portable air compressor alive and well.
WOOD MAGAZINE #34 Apr 1990 (v.7#2) pg. 76

Recommended pressure when using an air compressor to blow dust off your skin, clothing, etc.
WOOD MAGAZINE #38 Oct 1990 (v.7#6) pg. 24
Added Info WOOD MAGAZINE #40 Jan 1991 (v.8#1) pg. 11

Buyer's guide to air compressors costing $300 to $400.
WOOD MAGAZINE #69 Apr 1994 (v.11#3) pg. 58

Buyer's guide to air compressors. Twenty-six single-stage compressors are listed.
WOOD MAGAZINE #73 Oct 1994 (v.11#7) pg. 54

Product test of seven compact air compressors costing less than $350.
WOOD MAGAZINE #132 Apr 2001 (v.18#3) pg. 74

Air power for the home craftsman. What are the uses to which an air compressor can be put by the homeowner.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1980 (v.36#2) pg. 48

Guide to home air compressors. What is available and tips on selecting the best one for your uses.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1988 (v.44#4) pg. 37

AIR CONDITIONING entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR CONDITIONING
sa   AIR CONDITIONING MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   AUTOMOBILE AIR CONDITIONING
sa   ENERGY MANAGEMENT
sa   GEOTHERMAL ENERGY
sa   HEAT PUMP
sa   HUMIDITY CONTROL
sa   VENTILATION
xx   HOUSE

Evaporation cooling, an inexpensive form of air conditioning. A surplus squirrel-cage blower pulls hot air over paint rollers soaking in water. This causes the water to evaporate into the air and lower the ambiant temperature. Cooler air is then exhausted from this evaporative type of "air conditioner". Adding a sunbowl heater element can convert it into a heater for winter use.
ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF ENERGY #33 Aug 1978 pg. 37

How to buy a central air conditioning system for your home.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1972 (v.50#4) pg. 72

How to keep cool for less. Tips on how to keep indoor temperatures 10 to 15 degrees below outdoor temperatures without an air conditioner. A look at what ventilating fans, air conditioning and insulation can do to improve home comfort.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1974 (v.52#6) pg. 44

Air conditioner camouflage unit is a bookshelf with plastic grating between the shelves above and below the air conditioner.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1979 (v.57#4) pg. 179

How to choose a central air conditioner.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1980 (v.58#4) pg. 85

Tip: Insulate your window air conditoner with pieces of foam insulation during the winter.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1982 (v.60#10) pg. 86

Air conditioners. A look at types of units available and how they work, desirable features, and installation.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jun 1981 (v.4#9) pg. 12

Cooling down the house. Guidelines to determine if you need a high efficiency air conditioner.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jun 1987 (v.10#9) pg. 39

Installing an air conditioner in a concrete wall.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #80 Jun 1964 (v.14#3) pg. 38

How to relieve the space pinch in your house. Part 4. (1) Doorway framing, (2) hanging an accordion-fold door, (3) through-the-wall installation of an air conditioner, (4) insulating and paneling, (5) installing a suspended ceiling and (6) laying self-adhesive carpet tiles.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #126 Apr 1971 (v.21#4) pg. 42

Landscaping tips that help conceal the exterior condensor unit of the home air conditioner.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #127 Jun 1971 (v.21#5) pg. 48

How to install a central air conditioning unit for your home. Photos show step-by-step installation of a system specifically designed for do-it-yourself installation. Includes guidelines for determining your home's cooling needs.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #181 May-Jun 1977 (v.27#4) pg. 14

How to install a through-the-wall air conditioner.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #199 May-Jun 1979 (v.29#5) pg. 64

How to control the sun. Heat controlling concepts to keep your house cool in the summer with less energy consumption.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #209 May-Jun 1980 (v.30#5) pg. 81

How to install a central air conditioner.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #258 Apr 1985 (v.35#4) pg. 57

Six tips that cut air conditioning bills in half.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #260 Jul-Aug 1985 (v.35#6) pg. 102

Wordless Workshop suggests how to build a decorative lattice cover for an air conditioner's outdoor coil unit.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #316 Mar 1991 (v.41#3) pg. 88

Removable sections of picket fencing are used to conceal an air conditioning cooling coil.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #388 May 1998 (v.48#5) pg. 119

Tips on using vapor barriers and insulation to prevent air conditioning ducts from condensing out water vapor when they run through a crawl space.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #15 Jun-Jul 1983 pg. 14

Tip on installing antivibration padding on a rooftop-mounted air-conditioning unit.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #111 Aug-Sep 1997 pg. 20

A comparative report on high-efficiency room air conditioners.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Jun 1978 (v.186#6) pg. 152

Basic considerations when replacing a furnace, central air conditioner or water heater.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Apr 1987 (v.204#4) pg. 218

Compressor protector. Timer prevents an air conditioning compressor (or a refrigerator or freezer compressor) from re-starting within 5 minutes of a power failure or brownout. This helps protect the compressor motor from burning out. Est. cost: $22.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1986 (v.3#4) pg. 89

Fifty-five ways to cut air conditioning costs.
HANDY ANDY Apr 1978 (v.2#7) pg. 14

How to air condition a ductless house.
HANDY ANDY Apr 1979 (v.3#7) pg. 47

Tips on cooling your home with one big room air conditioner.
HANDY ANDY May 1979 (v.3#8) pg. 62

How to install a through-the-wall air conditioner.
HANDY ANDY Jul 1979 (v.3#9) pg. 50

Tip: Use water cooling to keep a west-window air conditioner from overheating.
HANDY ANDY Mar 1981 (v.5#6) pg. 66

Size your air conditioner to save money by using this "cooling load estimate" form for room air conditioners.
HOME MECHANIX #686 Jun 1985 (v.81) pg. 96

Tips on cutting a hole in the wall of a wood-frame house and installing a room air conditioner.
HOME MECHANIX #736 Aug 1989 (v.85) pg. 83

Tip on using a window air conditioner plumbed into your furnace return-air duct to form a "central" air conditioner.
HOME MECHANIX #744 Apr 1990 (v.86) pg. 100
Added Info HOME MECHANIX #746 Jun 1990 (v.86) pg. 6

Steps to make an air conditioner work more efficiently.
HOME MECHANIX #806 Jun 1996 (v.92) pg. 73

How to improve air conditioner efficiency.
HOMEOWNER Jun 1984 (v.9#5) pg. 64

Keeping your cool. Cost-saving ways to cool your house in addition to electric air conditioning.
HOMEOWNER Jul-Aug 1988 (v.13#6) pg. 24

Buyer's guide to central air conditioners. How to determine if central air is better for your house than separate room units.
HOMEOWNER Jul-Aug 1989 (v.14#6) pg. 50

Tips from a professional on how to reduce the cost of air conditioning and increase the life of air conditioning equipment.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO #1 Spring 1976 (v.1#1) pg. 59

How to install a central air conditioning system that is designed for do-it-yourself installation in conjunction with a forced air heating system.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO #5 Spring 1977 (v.2#1) pg. 102

Tips given on how to ease the strain on a window air conditioner during the hottest days of the year.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO #6 Summer 1977 (v.2#2) pg. 36

Computer program will calculate the required size air conditioner (in BTU's) which you need to air condition your home. It takes into account heating devices, people, windows, local climate, etc. Written in BASIC.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #42 Jun 1980 pg. 48

Installing a through-the-wall air conditioner.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #434 Jul 1964 (v.60) pg. 83

Install your own central air conditioning.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #447 Aug 1965 (v.61) pg. 82

Plywood platform attaches to the outside sill of a window to support a window air conditioner. Simplifies do-it-yourself installation.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #529 Jun 1972 (v.68) pg. 104

How to get by with minimum air conditioning. Operating tips to keep your electric bills down.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #553 Jun 1974 (v.70) pg. 32

How to install a central air conditioning unit on your forced air furnace.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #575 Apr 1976 (v.72) pg. 58

Forty ways to cool your house this summer and save money in the process.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #625 Jun 1980 (v.76) pg. 56

Usable heat from an air conditioner. Tips on installing the General Electric Hot Water Bank heat exchanger to help heat your water with waste heat from your air conditioner condensor.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #649 Jun 1982 (v.78) pg. 66

Air-conditioner protection circuit. Prevents motor burnout resulting from momentary power interruption. Designed for 115-volt window units requiring 12 to 20 amperes of current.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1986 (v.3#6) pg. 20

A fan-delay timer for air conditioning. Save on cooling costs by purging cool air trapped in an air-conditioning system when the compressor stops. Est. cost: $18.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1986 (v.3#7) pg. 34
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1986 (v.3#12) pg. 5

Air conditioner protector prevents compressor damage due to brownouts or blackouts, and also boosts operating efficiency up to 15%. Est. cost: $49.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1989 (v.6#3) pg. 57

Energy-efficient home cooling. How to fine tune your air conditioner for greatest efficiency, plus some alternatives to air conditioning to cool a home in the summer.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #51 May-Jun 1978 pg. 108

Air-conditioning guide. These worksheets can help trim your cooling costs. A computerized version of the worksheet, written in BASIC, is also included.
NEW SHELTER Jul-Aug 1984 (v.5#6) pg. 40, 60

Simple, inexpensive improvements to help cool a house.
NEW SHELTER Feb 1985 (v.6#2) pg. 111

A guide to finding and operating the best high-efficiency air conditioners. Both central systems and room air conditioners are considered.
NEW SHELTER Jul-Aug 1986 (v.7#6) pg. 77

Tip: Install an air conditioner in a fireplace for summer use, then remove it for winter use of the fireplace.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL Aug 1977 (v.5#8) pg. 92

Cold comfort. A guide to installing mini-duct air conditioning in an old house.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1997 (v.25#4) pg. 40

Tip: How to save energy and improve the efficiency of air conditioning units by planting sunflowers around the concrete slab that the outside unit sits on.
ORGANIC GARDENING Jul 1979 (v.26#7) pg. 20

How evaporative cooling systems work, plus tips on installation and maintenance.
PARENTS HOME Jul 1981 (v.5#9) pg. 41

Compressor guard device. Protect air conditioner, refrigerator and freezer motors from damage during power blackouts or brownouts. This timing device will not allow the electric motors in compressors to restart until 4.5 minutes have elapsed. This gives the system pressures time to equalize.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1978 (v.13#6) pg. 41

Build the compressor-mate. Prevent the compressors found in refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners from restarting for 5-minutes following a power outage.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1991 (v.8#8) pg. 35

Central control for non-central (window) air conditioning units utilizes X-10 remote-control devices.
POPULAR HOME AUTOMATION Nov 1999 (v.4#6) pg. 54

How to install a window air conditioner through a hole in an outside wall. That way, you can still choose between using the conditioner or just opening the window.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1974 (v.141#4) pg. 168

How to keep cool for less money. Tips to reduce heat build-up in your house and lower cooling costs.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1974 (v.141#6) pg. 116

How to install a room air conditioner through the outside wall of a room.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1977 (v.147#4) pg. 114

Insulated wooden box covers window air conditioner during the winter.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1980 (v.154#5) pg. 196

How to install a room air conditioner through the wall.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1983 (v.160#1) pg. 138

Air conditioners. How they work and how to buy one. Both room and central units are discussed.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1987 (v.164#6) pg. 138

Installing a through-the-wall air conditioner.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1992 (v.169#8) pg. 67

Central air conditioning. An equipment overview, how systems work, air conditioner maintenance, etc.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1998 (v.175#8) pg. 102

A protective enclosure for a window air conditioner for winter.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1965 (v.186#5) pg. 163

Home improvement article discusses the choice of air conditioning for your home.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1966 (v.188#5) pg. 88

Plastic film duct work turns a window air conditioner into a central unit by directing airflow through forced air furnace.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1966 (v.189#2) pg. 132

Decorative whatnot shelf conceals the inside portion of a window air conditioner.
POPULAR SCIENCE Feb 1968 (v.192#2) pg. 140

Tips on selecting, installing and maintaining a room air conditioner.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1968 (v.192#6) pg. 144

Tips on cooling your house with one high-BTU window air conditioner.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1971 (v.198#5) pg. 92

New ways to cut cooling costs. How to get the most for your air conditioning dollar. New equipment and maintenance tips.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1975 (v.206#5) pg. 112

How one man uses the heat output from an air conditioning system to heat the water for his household needs. Est. cost: $200.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1975 (v.207#4) pg. 125

Oversized condensing coil attached to a house air conditioning system is cooled by passing swimming pool water over the coil. In this way, the pool water is heated as the house is cooled. Est. cost: $150.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1978 (v.212#5) pg. 24

Use the exhaust heat from a built-in air conditioning system to heat hot water for a household of 4 people. Will provide a 40-degree rise in temperature as the water flows through the heat exchanger. Est. cost: $150.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1978 (v.213#4) pg. 38

Add ceiling-level cold air return ducts to improve your air conditioning system.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1985 (v.226#4) pg. 112

Energy miser for air conditioners. Build this device to control the cycling time of your central air-conditioning system. Designed for 24-volt DC control systems. Est. cost: $30.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1984 (v.55#7) pg. 43

Decorative folding screen to conceal air conditioner and deflect its cool air away from beds, etc.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS May 1966 (v.37#5) pg. 60

How to buy window air conditioners.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Jun 1971 (v.42#6) pg. 64

Buyer's guide to choosing an energy-efficient window air conditioner.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Fall 1980 pg. 52

How to cool your home and still save energy.
SUNSET Jul 1980 (v.165#1) pg. 68

Tip: Conceal a thru-the-wall air conditioner with a fabric wall hanging when the unit is not in use.
SUNSET May 1982 (v.168#5) pg. 156

Cooling trends. Advice on selecting and installing a window air conditioner.
TODAY'S HOMEOWNER #825 May 1998 (v.94) pg. 46

Tips on installing your own central air conditioner.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1969 (v.25#2) pg. 22

How to install a central home air conditioner.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1971 (v.27#2) pg. 8

AIR CUSHION VEHICLE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR CUSHION VEHICLE
x   GROUND EFFECT MACHINE
xx   AIRCRAFT

Dobson two-place air car assembled from precut parts. Est. cost: $1,000.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #492 May 1969 (v.65) pg. 68

Build the Yellow Jacket, an air cushion vehicle that will operate over land or water. Est. cost: $400.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1971 (v.135#3) pg. 126

Build this air-cushion vehicle from Popular Mechanics plans. Measures 14' long and 6 1/2' wide. Will hit speeds up to 60 mph with a 28-hp snowmobile engine and a second go-kart engine. Est. cost: $600. Plans cost: $10.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1975 (v.144#3) pg. 77

Build "Pegasus", an 87"-diameter air-cushion vehicle powered by a lawn mower engine. It carries over 200 pounds and clears obstacles up to 10" high. Basic construction illustrated, but plans must be ordered. Est. cost: $200.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1984 (v.161#1) pg. 62

AIR GUN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR GUN
xx   GUN

Build an air gun range. Two styles shown. (1) Outdoor range with targets clipped to wires running between two standards that hold a canvas backstop. (2) Target mounted on a corrugated box filled with bound magazines and crumpled paper or canvas.
BOYS' LIFE Sep 1986 (v.76#9) pg. H (34+)

How to build a home air gun range.
BOYS' LIFE Jul 1992 (v.82#7) pg. 40

Tip on making a BB dispenser from a plastic drinking straw.
BOYS' LIFE Feb 1994 (v.84#2) pg. 11

Tip on using a clean plastic ketchup squeeze bottle to load a BB gun.
BOYS' LIFE Jun 1994 (v.84#6) pg. 15

Build an indoor air gun target backstop.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1995 (v.85#10) pg. 20

Animated gallery for air guns.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #427 Dec 1963 (v.59) pg. 86

Choosing and using an air or carbon dioxide gun. How to construct two kinds of indoor pellet traps.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #534 Nov 1972 (v.68) pg. 112

Make your own shooting gallery for pellet gun or air rifle. Unit features five target systems which reset themselves automatically. They include paper targets, disapearing discs, rotating discs, rotating wheel and discs which revolve when hit.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #604 Sep 1978 (v.74) pg. 74

Audible target for a BB or pellet gun sounds a tone when it detects a "hit".
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1987 (v.4#9) pg. 52
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1987 (v.4#11) pg. 5

Table-top shooting gallery with moving targets.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1972 (v.137#6) pg. 146

Tips on selecting and using the newer air guns to learn or improve your shooting techniques. How to construct a simple indoor or outdoor range.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1978 (v.150#5) pg. 94

BB guns join the big leagues. A look at what is available in air guns for the adult.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1982 (v.157#1) pg. 86

Pellet trap for air guns.
POPULAR SCIENCE Dec 1971 (v.199#6) pg. 91

Buyer's guide to air rifles. A gun expert tells you how to choose.
POPULAR SCIENCE Nov 1975 (v.207#5) pg. 78

AIR PUMP entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR PUMP
sa   AIR COMPRESSOR
sa   BELLOWS
xx   PUMP

Build a "flit gun" (air pump) to blow sawdust away from a jigsaw blade.
FINE WOODWORKING #57 Mar-Apr 1986 pg. 8

Recycle an old refrigerator compressor into a combination vacuum pump and air pump.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #67 Jan-Feb 1981 pg. 68

Convert an empty caulking cartridge into a hand pump by fitting it with a handle and piston.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1969 (v.131#6) pg. 174

How to make a lightweight blower from an old tank vacuum cleaner.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1974 (v.30#4) pg. 22

AIR QUALITY entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR QUALITY
sa   HEAT EXCHANGER
sa   RADON
sa   VENTILATION
x   AIR POLLUTION
xx   ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
xx   HEALTH & SAFETY
xx   HOUSE

There's something in the air. Advice on sources of air pollution in the home. Looks at asbestos, histoplasmosis, radon, and urea formaldehyde foam insulation.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jul 1989 (v.12#10) pg. 14

Sick houses. Advice on toxins and contaminants in a home and how to remove or contain as many as possible.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Sep 1992 (v.15#12) pg. 14
Added Info CANADIAN WORKSHOP Jan 1993 (v.16#4) pg. 8
Added Info CANADIAN WORKSHOP May 1993 (v.16#8) pg. 4

Five steps to a healthier home. General advice on controlling indoor air pollution.
ELECTRONIC HOUSE Apr 1998 (v.13#2) pg. 52

Is your indoor air safe to breath? Part 1. Causes of air pollution in your home.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #251 Sep 1984 (v.34#7) pg. 132

Is your indoor air safe to breath. Part 2. Solving the problem. A look at air-to-air heat exchangers.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #252 Oct 1984 (v.34#8) pg. 128

Is your indoor air safe to breath? Part 3. Improving indoor air quality.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #253 Nov 1984 (v.34#9) pg. 94

Carbon monoxide. How to keep it from becoming a problem in your home.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #286 Feb 1988 (v.38#2) pg. 58
Added Info FAMILY HANDYMAN #289 May-Jun 1988 (v.38#5) pg. 14

How a house "breaths". A look at indoor air quality and ventilation.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #293 Nov-Dec 1988 (v.38#9) pg. 26

The fresh air contest. How combustion devices and fans compete for inside air. How proper chimney updrafts work. The causes and cures for back drafting.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #301 Sep 1989 (v.39#8) pg. 10

How to recognize and correct the ten most common indoor air pollutants.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #315 Feb 1991 (v.41#2) pg. 8

How to prevent carbon monoxide from becoming a deadly problem in a home.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #324 Jan 1992 (v.42#1) pg. 50

How to stop back drafting in a tight house.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #352 Oct 1994 (v.44#9) pg. 24

Allergy free in Ottawa. Experiences learned building a house for someone with severe allergic reactions to common building materials.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #46 Apr-May 1988 pg. 70
Added Info FINE HOMEBUILDING #49 Oct-Nov 1988 pg. 6

Beating indoor air pollution. How to combine a tight envelope with continuous air ventilation to boost energy efficiency and keep radon out.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #78 Dec 1992-Jan 1993 pg. 68

Plants for healthier homes. Selecting and using living houseplants to reduce indoor air pollution.
GARBAGE Mar-Apr 1990 (v.2#2) pg. 36
Added Info GARBAGE Jul-Aug 1990 (v.2#4) pg. 10

A look at some of the factors to consider in building a "clean air" house, one free of chemical toxins.
HARROWSMITH #72 Mar-Apr 1987 (v.11#6) pg. 46

The clean green machine. Using household plants to fight indoor air pollution. (1) Circulate indoor air through a solarium filled with some of the best plants to filter air. (2) Build a plant-charcoal air filter.
HOME MECHANIX #727 Nov 1988 (v.84) pg. 56
Added Info HOME MECHANIX #734 Jun 1989 (v.85) pg. 8
Added Info HOME MECHANIX #735 Jul 1989 (v.85) pg. 8

Clean air, healthy air for your home environment. Tips on filtering indoor air, controlling humidity, and maintaining ventilation.
HOME MECHANIX #749 Oct 1990 (v.86) pg. 16

Simple techniques to test for and cure back drafting.
HOME MECHANIX #788 Sep 1994 (v.90) pg. 8

Breathing easier. How to make sure the air in your home is free from smoke, pollen, excess moisture and other harmful irritants.
HOME MECHANIX #793 Mar 1995 (v.91) pg. 62

Clearing the air. Strategies for beating indoor air pollution.
HOMEOWNER Oct 1989 (v.14#8) pg. 28

Back drafting. Recognizing and remedying a largely unrecognized, and potentially deadly, form of indoor air pollution.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #114 Nov-Dec 1988 pg. 92

Are you home sick? Causes and solutions of indoor contamination or air pollution.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #116 Mar-Apr 1989 pg. 90

Clean air indoors. 4 articles look at the dangers of trapped pollution in todays tighter houses.
NEW SHELTER May-Jun 1982 (v.3#5) pg. 20

SPECIAL REPORT: Your healthy home. How to improve air and water quality. Includes a guide to nontoxic home maintenance, building a safe home from the ground up, and water treatments.
NEW SHELTER Sep 1984 (v.5#7) pg. 43

Indoor air quality. Where indoor pollution comes from and what you can do about it.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1987 (v.164#8) pg. 103

Build an air-pollution tester which uses a wet impingement system for capturing pollutant particles.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1970 (v.197#4) pg. 97

Healthy building. Reduce indoor pollution by using nontoxic building materials. Also includes tips on removing toxic chemicals from new carpeting.
PRACTICAL HOMEOWNER Feb 1987 (v.2#2) pg. 30
Added Info PRACTICAL HOMEOWNER Jul-Aug 1987 (v.2#6) pg. 14

Indoor pollution solution. You can breathe easier with houseplants. Tips on using several varieties of house plants or a "plant air cleanser" to remove some pollutants from the air.
PRACTICAL HOMEOWNER Sep 1987 (v.2#7) pg. 18
Added Info PRACTICAL HOMEOWNER Mar 1988 (v.3#3) pg. 14

The amateur scientist. How to detect microgram quantities of metals in air, liquids and solids. Includes plans for a ring oven to do chemical-spot testing. Used in monitoring for pollution.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Feb 1981 (v.244#2) pg. 168

AIR SUPPORTED BUILDINGS entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR SUPPORTED BUILDINGS
xx   BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

Construct a large 27x85 ft. air bubble shelter out of a 40x100 ft. polyethylene sheet which is inflated with an ordinary household fan. Ideal for a winter shelter for large projects. Est. cost: $60.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jan 1969 (v.194#1) pg. 134

Build your own inflatable dome. Use a kit or start from scratch. A 16-, 25-, or 34-foot diameter version is available in kit form. You can also make your own out of nylon reinforced vinyl. Est. cost (kit version): $300 to $675.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1973 (v.203#1) pg. 90

AIR TOOL entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIR TOOL
sa   AIR CLAMP
sa   AIR COMPRESSOR
sa   AIR HOSE & LINE
sa   NAIL GUN
sa   SANDBLASTING & BEAD BLASTING
x   PNEUMATIC TOOL
xx   AIR COMPRESSOR
xx   TOOL

An introduction to pneumatic tools. Looks at compressors, nailers, staplers, hoses, couplings, accessories, ... etc.
CANADIAN HOME WORKSHOP Jul-Aug 1999 (v.22#9) pg. 46

Power nailing. A look at air nailers and staplers.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Apr 1986 (v.9#7) pg. 18

Working with small air-powered dental handpieces (drills).
ELECTRONICS NOW Jun 1994 (v.65#6) pg. 83

Air power. Here's what compressed-air tools can do for you and how to buy the air compressor to run them.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #297 Apr 1989 (v.39#4) pg. 84

Nail guns. Pneumatic nailers and staplers allow speed and precision not possible with hand nailing. What is available and tips on their use.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #15 Jun-Jul 1983 pg. 49
Added Info FINE HOMEBUILDING #17 Oct-Nov 1983 pg. 6

Finish nailers. An overview of the new models of air-powered (pneumatic) finish nailers. How they work, nails and magazines, selection, etc.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #47 Jun-Jul 1988 pg. 72

Framing nailers. A guide to selecting the right air-powered nailer for the work that you do.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #56 Oct-Nov 1989 pg. 52

Tip on keeping dirt and grit out of a pneumatic tool's air connector when the tool is not in use.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #99 Dec 1995-Jan 1996 pg. 22

Tip on using a sharpened muffler-cutting chisel and a pneumatic air hammer for cutting wood.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #114 Feb-Mar 1998 pg. 30

Tip on using a pneumatic impact hammer for driving nails in tight places.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #118 Aug-Sep 1998 pg. 30

Air-powered tools. What's available and where to get it.
FINE WOODWORKING #14 Jan-Feb 1979 pg. 70

Working wood without electricity. How Amish woodworkers convert modern machines to operate off of a diesel-driven lineshaft, hydraulic pressure, and air power.
FINE WOODWORKING #56 Jan-Feb 1986 pg. 72

Compressed-air systems. Choosing and using compressors. Advice on installing permanent air lines in the workshop. Tips on selecting a spray gun and accessories.
FINE WOODWORKING #82 May-Jun 1990 pg. 56
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #84 Sep-Oct 1990 pg. 10
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #85 Nov-Dec 1990 pg. 6

Tip on selecting quick-change couplings for a compressed-air system.
FINE WOODWORKING #85 Nov-Dec 1990 pg. 26

Pneumatic die grinders in the woodshop. Using these versatile tools to solve a host of cutting, grinding and sanding problems.
FINE WOODWORKING #127 Nov-Dec 1997 pg. 88

Coming up for air. Making the leap to air-powered tools in woodworking. Advice on selecting tools, fittings, hoses, etc.
FINE WOODWORKING #130 May-Jun 1998 pg. 75

Working on air. Part 2. Putting air compressors to use in the home and shop. Some tips.
HOME MECHANIX #730 Feb 1989 (v.85) pg. 74

Tip on using a lightweight air-impact hammer to do woodcarving with chisels.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1976 (v.145#1) pg. 152

Lower-priced air-driven tools now available for the home workshop. They include grinders, drills, sanders, chisels, and wrenches.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1971 (v.199#2) pg. 92

Power wrenches. What is available and tips on their uses. Both air and electric models are viewed.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1978 (v.213#2) pg. 106

Air tools for your shop. Tips on selecting and using air tools in the home workshop.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1981 (v.218#6) pg. 100

Air power. What is available in air-powered tools and compressors for do-it-yourselfers. How to modify existing air tools and make accessories to do new jobs. Includes instructions for making a simple sand blaster cabinet for cleaning and etching small parts.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1988 (v.233#1) pg. 68, 72
Added Info POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1988 (v.233#4) pg. 6

Tools you can rent to help you demolish your own concrete or asphalt paving.
SUNSET Sep 1982 (v.169#3) pg. 196

Air power. What an air compressor can add to your workshop. Tips on selecting a compressor and which air tools you can use with them.
WOOD MAGAZINE #10 Apr 1986 (v.3#2) pg. 50

Tip: Add a tire-valve extender to inflator needles.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1988 (v.44#2) pg. 64

Guide to air-powered tools for the homeowner. What is available and tips on their use.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1988 (v.44#5) pg. 74

AIRBRUSHING entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRBRUSHING
xx   ART BRUSH
xx   DRAWING & PAINTING
xx   SPRAY PAINTING & FINISHING

Rendering shadows in an airbrush illustration. Basic information on volumetric and cast shadows and how to achieve variations in each through masking and spraying techniques.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jun 1989 (v.6#6) pg. 30

How to use an airbrush to render transparent and translucent objects.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Aug 1989 (v.6#8) pg. 86

How to create realistic wood and brick surfaces by combining airbrush with colored pencils or pen and ink.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 44
Added Info ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1990 (v.7#2) pg. 42

Mixed-media illustrations. A description of Tom Gonzalez's techniques that combine pastel, watercolors and airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 105

Using masks in airbrushing. How to create a variety of patterns and effects with everyday objects.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1989 (v.6#12) pg. 36

How to render metal in airbrush illustrations.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1990 (v.7#2) pg. 41

Tips on illustration board and frisket selection for use in airbrushing.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Apr 1990 (v.7#4) pg. 6

Choosing the right paint for airbrushing. Covers watercolor, ink, dye, gouache and acrylic.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Apr 1990 (v.7#4) pg. 39

Airbrush supplies made simple. Information on choosing an airbrush, on the range of media that can be used, decisions on a painting surface, friskets and air supply. Photos show the basic five-step process of painting a picture.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1990 (v.7#7) pg. 66

How to make corrections and adjustments in airbrush artwork.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Sep 1990 (v.7#9) pg. 78

Simple tricks for creating fur and leather textures with an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1990 (v.7#12) pg. 72

Basic airbrushing dos and don't when using masking film or frisket, preformed templates and handmade stencils.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Apr 1991 (v.8#4) pg. 22

Outfitting for airbrushing. A guide to airbrushes and compressors.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jun 1991 (v.8#6) pg. 19

Airbrush techniques for achieving the coloring, texture and shapes of polished semiprecious stones. Three-step diagrams are furnished for jade, tigereye and purple stone.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1991 (v.8#7) pg. 18

How to use graphite or colored pencils to add texture to airbrush art.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Nov 1991 (v.8#11) pg. 83

Suggestions for experiments in airbrushing on different types of paper.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1991 (v.8#12) pg. 78

Maintaining an airbrush. Troubleshooting and preventing problems.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1992 (v.9#2) pg. 84

Taking the edge off. A four-part method for getting a soft, natural look with an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Apr 1992 (v.9#4) pg. 79

Grooving with airbrush. How to develop a brush-like textured surface in airbrush work through the use of gel medium and gesso.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jun 1992 (v.9#6) pg. 18

Two tricks for making innovative color blends and for painting water drops using an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1992 (v.9#7) pg. 76

Efficient ways to get from concept to painting. Tips from top airbrush professionals.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1992 (v.9#12) pg. 80

Strategic planning for airbrushing. Working out a composition.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1993 (v.10#2) pg. 66

How to make complete eye-catching images with an airbrush using only three colors (yellow, red and blue).
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1993 (v.10#7) pg. 62

Using stencils in airbrushing. How to develop a quick layout and simple value sketch with stencils you design yourself.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 20

How to paint convincing facial features. A step-by-step guide to airbrush rendering of the eyes, nose and mouth.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Oct 1993 (v.10#10) pg. 44

Tip describes how to make a gadget that catches and contains the mist when flushing water through an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Nov 1993 (v.10#11) pg. 13A
Added Info ARTIST'S MAGAZINE May 1994 (v.11#5) pg. 10

Spraying realistic watercolors. An introduction to manipulating watercolor using an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1993 (v.10#12) pg. 16

Tip shows how to use 35mm film canisters for airbrush color cups.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1994 (v.11#2) pg. 6A

How to use a computer to scan initial sketches, refine drawings and cut airbrush frisket on a drum plotter.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Mar 1994 (v.11#3) pg. 18

Using an airbrush to render realistic textures that simulate wood grain, stone, chrome and glass.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jun 1994 (v.11#6) pg. 18

How to execute details in an airbrush painting without the aid of frisket, stencils or brushwork.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Aug 1994 (v.11#8) pg. 66

Four airbrush techniques for creating unusual effects. (1) Line-and-wash adds color to an ink drawing. (2) Use of strips of cut and torn paper to create variable edge qualities. (3) Use of found objects as masks to create textures. (4) Use of hand-made stencils for modeling forms.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Oct 1994 (v.11#10) pg. 71

Practical tips on selecting and using a mouth atomizer for applying paint, fixatives and varnish.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1994 (v.11#12) pg. 2A

A multi-layered approach to realism. How to make your subject stand out by layering airbrush and brushwork.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Dec 1994 (v.11#12) pg. 70

How to build depth and drama by airbrushing exclusively with sepia tones.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jan 1995 (v.12#1) pg. 71

Airbrushing techniques for rendering highly textural elements like sand and rocks.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Mar 1995 (v.12#3) pg. 41

How to airbrush realistic-looking fabric.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Sep 1995 (v.12#9) pg. 32

How to combine drybrush and dry transfer with airbrushing to achieve a variety of textures. Examples show how to create realistic fur and pigskin.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Oct 1995 (v.12#10) pg. 38

Airbrush made easy. How to decide which airbrush model to select and advice on getting acquainted with the tool. Step-by-step photos show how to create both flat and gradated washes.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jul 1996 (v.13#7) pg. 30

How to create loose, painterly texture in airbrush paintings.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Nov 1996 (v.13#11) pg. 63

Advice on adequate ventilation when using an airbrush.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Feb 1999 (v.16#2) pg. 75

The airbrush alternative. How eight artists use this tool to enhance, build and soften their paintings.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Nov 1999 (v.16#11) pg. 56

How to paint models with an air brush. Photos show the basic operation of a beginner's kit. Includes tips on preparing the surface to be painted.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1978 (v.68#10) pg. 65

SPECIAL SECTION on airbrushing ceramics. Introduction to equipment, pigments, and technique. Includes five projects.
CERAMICS Nov-Dec 1990 (v.27#3) pg. 30

Airbrushing. Replies to inquiries about airbrushing ceramics.
CERAMICS Apr 1994 (v.30#8) pg. 19

The mysterious airbrush. Part 1. Everything you need to know about the airbrush (equipment, paint and costs) and several easy-to-follow techniques that make using the airbrush simple.
CHIP CHATS Jul-Aug 1995 (v.42#4) pg. 53

The mysterious airbrush. Part 2. Painting a decorative bufflehead decoy.
CHIP CHATS Sep-Oct 1995 (v.42#5) pg. 92

How to stencil wildflowers on napkins, placemats and window curtains using an airbrush. Patterns for black-eyed Susan, bell flower, violets and wild rose furnished.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1979 (v.10#4) pg. 50

Advice on getting started in airbrushing. Describes equipment and supplies. Suggests two exercises for practice using an airbrush.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK May-Jun 1996 (v.23#3) pg. 8

Low-cost airbrush is made from an animal-syringe needle and a felt-tip marker.
FINE WOODWORKING #65 Jul-Aug 1987 pg. 10

Tip on making your own regulated air supply for airbrush use from a portable air tank and a small 12-volt air compressor.
FINESCALE MODELER Dec 1989 (v.7#8) pg. 79

Finishing school for plastic kit models. Lesson 7. Basic airbrushing. Getting started with the ideal paint applicator.
FINESCALE MODELER Nov 1990 (v.8#7) pg. 42

Two ideas for capturing waste paint and thinner when cleaning an airbrush.
FINESCALE MODELER Nov 1990 (v.8#7) pg. 74

Finishing school for plastic kit models. Lesson 8. Advanced airbrushing. Camouflage, masking techniques, soft blended lines, etc.
FINESCALE MODELER Dec 1990 (v.8#8) pg. 42

Finishing school for plastic kit models. Lesson 9. Airbrushing natural metal finishes.
FINESCALE MODELER Jan 1991 (v.9#1) pg. 42

Holder for airbrush and hose made from PVC pipe.
FINESCALE MODELER Sep 1991 (v.9#6) pg. 66

Airbrush tips from the experts. Thirteen experienced modelers share information on their equipment, paints, and techniques.
FINESCALE MODELER Mar 1992 (v.10#3) pg. 50

Airbrush basics. A beginner's guide to that wonderful, yet frustrating miniature spray gun. Looks at operation, cleaning, air sources, respirators and hoods, etc.
FINESCALE MODELER Dec 1993 (v.11#8) pg. 44

The air tank alternative. An inexpensive, portable and quiet air source for your airbrush.
FINESCALE MODELER Nov 1994 (v.12#7) pg. 32

Airbrush holder made from pipe flange and 5" nipple.
FINESCALE MODELER Jan 1995 (v.13#1) pg. 74

Tip on cleaning airbrush tips with dental floss.
FINESCALE MODELER Sep 1995 (v.13#7) pg. 64

Basic airbrushes. A survey of seven starter airbrushes for modelers.
FINESCALE MODELER Jan 1996 (v.14#1) pg. 32

Basic airbrushing techniques. Using your airbrush to paint better models, especially camouflage paint jobs.
FINESCALE MODELER Feb 1996 (v.14#2) pg. 30

Advanced airbrushes. A survey of seven double-action airbrushes for modelers. Includes instructions on cleaning your airbrush.
FINESCALE MODELER Mar 1996 (v.14#3) pg. 82

Airbrushing using acrylic model paints. An overview of available brands and the basics of airbrushing.
FINESCALE MODELER Nov 1997 (v.15#9) pg. 32

Airbrushing basics. Learning to use one of scale modeling's most essential tools. Part 1. Airbrush types, air sources, paint, and cleaning the airbrush.
FINESCALE MODELER Feb 1999 (v.17#2) pg. 30

Airbrushing basics. Part 2. Tricks, techniques, and troubleshooting.
FINESCALE MODELER Mar 1999 (v.17#3) pg. 32

Inexpensive airbrush power. Build your own airbrush compressor by combining a battery-powered car tire pump with a seven-gallon air tank and regulator. Est. cost: $50.
FINESCALE MODELER Dec 1999 (v.17#10) pg. 40

Airbrushing: what every photographer should know about it. Airbrushing is the art of applying soft, subtle, tonal progressions through the use of compressed air or gas.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1978 (v.27#9) pg. 46

How to transfer paint from spray cans for use in an airbrush. This avoids the need to thin your own paint.
IPMS/USA JOURNAL Jul 1993 (v.5#5) pg. 31
Added Info IPMS/USA JOURNAL Jan 1994 (v.6#2) pg. 13

Airbrushes. Basic information for model makers.
IPMS/USA JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1996 (v.9#1) pg. 54

Basic airbrushing techniques for applying color to leather. Part 1. Selecting equipment and practice lessons.
LEATHER CRAFTERS JOURNAL May-Jun 1992 (v.2#3) pg. 34

Basic airbrushing techniques for applying color to leather. Part 2. Adding color to a stamped design.
LEATHER CRAFTERS JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1992 (v.2#4) pg. 10

Basic airbrushing techniques for applying color to leather. Part 3. Shading and coloring a fall oak leaf.
LEATHER CRAFTERS JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1992 (v.2#5) pg. 26

Learning to air brush models. One person's experience.
MODEL BOATS #473 Jul 1990 (v.40) pg. 32

Airbrushing scale model boats. Part 1. Equipment.
MODEL BOATS #582 May 27 1999 (v.49) pg. 22

Airbrushing scale model boats. Part 2. Basic technique.
MODEL BOATS #583 Jun 24 1999 (v.49) pg. 26

Airbrushing scale model boats. Part 3. Weathering.
MODEL BOATS #584 Jul 22 1999 (v.49) pg. 26

Painting with an airbrush. The basic of using this valuable modeling tool.
MODEL RAILROADER Jun 1992 (v.59#6) pg. 128

Airbrushing for model railroaders. Selecting and using this remarkable tool.
MODEL RAILROADER Nov 1998 (v.65#11) pg. 74

Airbrushing color photos to add images not found in the original print.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Apr 1987 (v.15#12) pg. 38
Added Info PHOTOGRAPHIC Aug 1987 (v.16#4) pg. 12

Painting on fabric with an airbrush. The basics of operating an airbrush, manipulating the fabric, painting yardage and using stencils. Includes instructions for painting a Shibori scarf using the Japanese pole wrapping method of arashi. Also includes a gridded pattern for a woman's jacket with raglan sleeves, a V-neckline and set-in pockets.
THREADS #31 Oct-Nov 1990 pg. 67

An introduction to the airbrush, a super-versatile finishing tool for a woodshop.
WOOD MAGAZINE #49 Jan 1992 (v.9#1) pg. 56

Low cost airbrushes make painting fun. Tips on selecting and using one.
WORKBENCH Jan-Feb 1979 (v.35#1) pg. 77

AIRCRAFT entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT
sa   AIR CUSHION VEHICLE
sa   AIRCRAFT ACCESSORIES
sa   AIRCRAFT AIR INTAKE SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT AIRFOIL
sa   AIRCRAFT ALTERNATOR & GENERATOR
sa   AIRCRAFT BATTERY
sa   AIRCRAFT BRAKE SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT BUYING & SELLING
sa   AIRCRAFT CARBURETOR
sa   AIRCRAFT CLEANING & POLISHING
sa   AIRCRAFT COCKPIT & INTERIOR
sa   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION
sa   AIRCRAFT CORROSION
sa   AIRCRAFT COWLING
sa   AIRCRAFT DEICING SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT DESIGN
sa   AIRCRAFT DOCUMENTATION
sa   AIRCRAFT DOOR
sa   AIRCRAFT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT ENGINE
sa   AIRCRAFT EXHAUST SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT FABRIC COVERING
sa   AIRCRAFT FAIRING
sa   AIRCRAFT FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT FLIGHT SIMULATOR
sa   AIRCRAFT FLIGHT TESTING
sa   AIRCRAFT FLOATS
sa   AIRCRAFT FUEL SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT HANGAR & TIE DOWN
sa   AIRCRAFT HARDWARE
sa   AIRCRAFT HEATING & VENTILATION SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT IGNITION SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT INSPECTION
sa   AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENT
sa   AIRCRAFT INSURANCE
sa   AIRCRAFT JACK
sa   AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR
sa   AIRCRAFT LIGHTING SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT LOCK
sa   AIRCRAFT LUBRICATION
sa   AIRCRAFT MAGNETO
sa   AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   AIRCRAFT OIL SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT OXYGEN SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT PAINTING & FINISHING
sa   AIRCRAFT PILOTING
sa   AIRCRAFT PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT PRESSURIZATION
sa   AIRCRAFT PROPELLER
sa   AIRCRAFT RESTORATION
sa   AIRCRAFT RESTRAINT SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT RIGGING & TRIMMING
sa   AIRCRAFT SEAT
sa   AIRCRAFT SIMULATOR
sa   AIRCRAFT SKIS
sa   AIRCRAFT SPARK PLUG
sa   AIRCRAFT SPINNER
sa   AIRCRAFT STARTER SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT STORAGE
sa   AIRCRAFT TOOL
sa   AIRCRAFT VACUUM SYSTEM
sa   AIRCRAFT WEIGHT & BALANCE
sa   AIRCRAFT WELDING
sa   AIRCRAFT WINDOW & CANOPY
sa   AUTOGIRO
sa   AVIATION DRAWING & PAINTING
sa   AVIATION PHOTOGRAPHY
sa   AVIATION RADIO
sa   GLIDER & SAILPLANE
sa   GYROPLANE
sa   HANG GLIDING
sa   HELICOPTER
sa   HOT AIR BALLOON
sa   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT
sa   ORNITHOPTER
sa   TOY AIRCRAFT
sa   UNIDENTIFIED FLYING OBJECT

Tip on color coding aircraft piping to identify the contents (fuel, fuel vent, oil, pitot pressure, static pressure, and manifold pressure).
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Mar-Apr 1993 pg. 9

Scaled planes. Tips from a famous replicator for builders embarking on the re-creation of nostalgic aeroplanes.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1984 (v.11#1) pg. 31

F.8L Falco kit airplane. Some building tips, owner comments and future plans.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1985 (v.12#8) pg. 22

How to get satisfaction when purchasing a kit airplane. An explanation of warranties and your legal recourse if not satisfied.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1986 (v.13#9) pg. 17

Pitfalls of kit airplanes.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1987 (v.14#1) pg. 52

A compendium of suggestions for degaussing a magnetized airframe.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Dec 1993 (v.15#12) pg. 7

Build an all-wood airplane, the MI Mini Ace, for under $1,000.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #450 Nov 1965 (v.61) pg. 104

One-place homebuilt airplane. Low-wing, open cockpit, 650-lb airplane is powered by a 40-hp Volkswagen engine. Airframe stressed to 6.6 G's. Wings and horizontal stabilizer can be removed for trailering on its own wheels. Est. cost: $1,000.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #496 Sep 1969 (v.65) pg. 72

Mechanix Illustrated two-passenger Volksplane reviewed and tested. Powered by a VW engine of 60- to 65-hp. Designed to be homebuilt. Plans cost $45.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #528 May 1972 (v.68) pg. 67

Mechanix Illustrated Baby Ace. King of the homebuilt airplanes. A profile of the airplane and its history over the last 20 years. Instructions on how and where to get plans.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #545 Oct 1973 (v.69) pg. 11

Profile of a homebuilt airplane, the KR-2, single seater, low-wing which uses plastic foam for some of the structure. Powered by an 80 hp VW engine.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #571 Dec 1975 (v.71) pg. 84

Illustrations and addresses for plans of ten airplanes you can build.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #572 Jan 1976 (v.72) pg. 66

The Quickie, a one-man homebuilt airplane that can be built from a kit. Forward wings, with wheels at the tips, contain the elevators. Rear wings have ailerons. Rudder pedals are linked to the tail wheel. Est. cost: $4,000.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #608 Jan 1979 (v.75) pg. 36

Delta wing airplane is powered by small jet engine.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1965 (v.124#1) pg. 152

All-metal, one-man airplane is powered by a Volkswagen engine. Est. cost: $600.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1968 (v.129#5) pg. 120

Build a four-place cabin airplane for $3,500. Design by Jim Bede. Called the BD-4. Wings are ready-made and most of the fuselage just bolts together.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1969 (v.131#5) pg. 112

Teenie Two. Volkswagen-powered plane can be built from PM plans.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1971 (v.135#5) pg. 94

A look at 17 of the best homebuilt planes.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1972 (v.137#5) pg. 88

Homebuilt amphibian airplane, the two-seat Coot. Est. cost: $3,500. Plans for $150.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1972 (v.137#6) pg. 88

The Pazmany all-metal homebuilt two-seater plane is profiled. Est. cost: $2,600. Plans cost $150.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1972 (v.138#1) pg. 92

Sidewinder, a side-by-side, two-place, all-metal homebuilt airplane is profiled. Est. cost: $3,500. Plans cost $125.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1972 (v.138#2) pg. 98

Homebuilt all-metal, VW engine-powered, single-seat "Mini-Hawk" is profiled. Est. cost: $1,000. Plans cost $35.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1972 (v.138#3) pg. 114

Homebuilt mini-Mustang flys at 250 mph. Carries a 230 lb. pilot, has retractable landing gear and all metal construction. Est. cost: $1,500. Plans cost $125.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1972 (v.138#4) pg. 96

Jim Bede's BD-5 homebuilt plane profiled. Features a pusher prop, sleek design and speeds over 200 mph with a 45-hp engine. Available in regular or sailplane version. Est. cost: $2,100.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1972 (v.138#5) pg. 174

Homebuilt delta-wing airplane features folding wings, retractable gear, 4-passenger capacity. Est. cost: $3,500. Plans cost $125.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1972 (v.138#6) pg. 128

A profile of the Thorp T-18 Tiger, a low-wing, two-place (side-by-side) plane that will hit 190 mph with a 150-hp Lycoming engine. Uses simple construction methods in the airframe. Est. cost: $5,800. Plans cost $150.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1973 (v.139#2) pg. 91

Profile of the Ken Rand homebuilt airplane called the KR-1. A 36-hp Volkwagen engine gives a top speed of 170 mph in this low wing, one-place plane with retractable gear and removable wings. Much of the plane is built of Styrofoam and wood. Plans cost: $20.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1973 (v.139#3) pg. 89

A look at George Pereiros' Osprey, a flying boat you can build yourself. Est. cost: $1,000 plus engine and propeller. Plans cost $65.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1973 (v.139#4) pg. 78

A profile of the VariViggen homebuilt aircraft. A large delta-shaped wing at the rear, twin tails, a pusher propeller, tandem seating and a small wing on the nose are unique features of this plane.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1973 (v.139#5) pg. 145

The Pazmany PL-4A, a homebuilt single-seater that is powered by a Volkswagen engine. Est. cost: $2,000. Plans cost $50.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1973 (v.139#6) pg. 127

The DAL-1 Tuholer, a homebuilt airplane designed by Tony Spezio has two cockpits in tandem. Wings fold up for trailering airplane behind car. Plans cost $40.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1973 (v.140#1) pg. 85

The Davis DA-2A, a two-seater airplane you can build. Has a V-tail. Est. cost: $1,600. Plans cost $110.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1973 (v.140#2) pg. 124

The EEA Biplane, A single-cockpit plane for build-it-yourselfers. Plans cost $38.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1973 (v.140#3) pg. 102

The RV-3, a build-it-yourself plane that offers aerobatic performance and STOL characteristics. Can land at 48 mph in 300 ft. and take off in 250 ft. Est. cost: $2,500. Plan cost $90.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1973 (v.140#4) pg. 148

A look at the Pitts Special, an aerobatic homebuilt plane. Plans cost $150.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1973 (v.140#5) pg. 122

How to build the Bede 5J, the first build-it-yourself jet. Available in kit form for the advanced amateur. Est. cost: $21,400.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1973 (v.140#5) pg. 192

The Scamp, a Volkswagen powered, single-seater, open-cockpit, all-metal bi-plane you can build. Est. cost (kit): $2,245. Plans cost $50.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1973 (v.140#6) pg. 160

Side-by-side two-seater called the Zenith. Est. cost: $2,700. Plans cost $150.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1974 (v.141#3) pg. 128

Homebuilt plane is scaled-down replica of Britain's World War II Hawker Hurricane. Constructed of wood with plywood skins and fabric covering. Est. cost: $4,000. Plans cost $115.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1974 (v.141#4) pg. 110

Single place, low wing metal homebuilt plane started out as a surplus aircraft wingtip tank. Est. cost: $1500. Plans cost $50.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1974 (v.141#5) pg. 109

Homebuilt biplane carries two people, side-by-side in the same open cockpit. The "Wichawk" is styled similar to the Steaman PT-17 trainer. Est. cost: $3,500. Plans cost $125.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1974 (v.141#6) pg. 74

A 300-mph aerobatic homebuilt plane features tandem cockpit, retractable tricycle gear, turbocharged engine and much more. Est. cost: $20,000.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1974 (v.142#1) pg. 75

Homebuilt monoplane powered by Volkswagen engine can be built in single or dual seat version. Called the Sonerai I or Sonerai II, they cost $2,200 and $2,500 respectively. Plans cost $50 or $57.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1974 (v.142#2) pg. 108

Twin-tailed Mini-Coupe is powered by a Volkswagen engine, carries one person, and has an open cockpit. Est. cost (kit): $2,400.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1974 (v.142#3) pg. 78

PDQ-2, a pusher type airplane with a totally open pilot seat at the front of the plane, no fuselage, just wings and tail assembly. Powered with a 35-hp snowmobile engine. Est. cost: $600-$800. Plans cost $20.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1974 (v.142#4) pg. 134

The Sorrell Hiberbipe, a biwing airplane with negative stagger (the lower wing is ahead of the upper wing). Ailerons run full length of wing. Features 180-hp, enclosed cockpit, and carries two people. Available as kit or assembled. Est. cost: $8,500.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1974 (v.142#5) pg. 85

Photos and addresses for 10 homebuilt aircraft designs.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1976 (v.145#2) pg. 72

A profile of the mini canard-winged homebuilt called the VariEze. A two-place, swept-winged, prop driven plane that can cruise at 150 mph. Est. cost: $2,700.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1976 (v.145#2) pg. 74

Popular Mechanic's pick of the 10 top sports planes you can build yourself.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1979 (v.151#2) pg. 114

Seven exciting new sport planes you can build from purchased plans and/or from kits.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1980 (v.153#1) pg. 76

How the new homebuilt ultralights take shape. What is available in kits and plans. Information on how foam wings are fabricated.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1980 (v.154#1) pg. 80

21 exciting new sports planes you can build. Photos, descriptions, and estimated costs.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1981 (v.155#1) pg. 74

Build the PM Woodhopper ultralight airplane. 32-ft wingspan and 15 to 30 hp engine will carry a 200 pound pilot. Est. cost: $700 to $1500. Plans must be ordered.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1981 (v.156#5) pg. 110

Twelve hot, new sport planes you can build. Photos and descriptions of aircraft which can be built from plans or kits.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1982 (v.157#1) pg. 79

14 new ultralights you can build from kits. Photos and descriptions.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1982 (v.157#5) pg. 94

A roundup of aircraft that can be built from plans. Includes chart of source names, addresses and craft specifications.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1970 (v.196#6) pg. 98

The Flying Rail. A twin-engine, one-man, open-cockpit pusher airplane you can build from plans or a kit. Est. cost: $2,500.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1971 (v.199#4) pg. 55

Single-seat all metal BD-5 airplane features a pusher type propeller. Plane will cruise at 200 mph, get 38 mpg, fly 1,215 miles, is fully aerobatic, yet can fly almost like a sailplane. Powered by a snowmobile engine. Est. cost (kit): $2,965.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1973 (v.203#2) pg. 80

A look at some of the top contenders for the $120,000 Kremer Prize for being the first to fly a man-powered plane.
POPULAR SCIENCE Feb 1974 (v.204#2) pg. 90

How to join a flying club or start your own.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1975 (v.206#6) pg. 90

Tips on buying and building an ultralight from a kit.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1984 (v.224#5) pg. 103

Two-seat tandem airplane, open cockpit, high wing, powered by a 65-hp engine. Called the "Woody Pusher", the plane will take 900 to 1,000 hours to build. Plans are included for a balsa scale model of the aircraft. Large scale plans available for $40. Est. cost: $1,200.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Jan 1969 (v.40#1) pg. 56

Build your own World War II fighter, the Der Jaeger, a single-seater biplane. Includes description and instructions on where to order plans. Est. cost: $2,200.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Jun 1970 (v.41#6) pg. 38

Profile of the Jim Bede BD-5 sport plane that is built from a kit. Est. cost: $1,950.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Oct 1971 (v.42#10) pg. 40

Profile of the homebuilt delta wing plane that can be towed behind your car. Est. cost: $3,000. Plans cost $125.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Oct 1972 (v.43#10) pg. 40

What is available in ultralight airplane kits. Photos, typical prices and tips.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Sep-Oct 1982 pg. 88

An introduction to airplane kits. Advice on the selection of a kit airplane, taking delivery of the kit, checking and storing the kit parts, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1987 (v.36#3) pg. 33

Biplane assembly and rigging procedures.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1988 (v.37#2) pg. 27

Selecting a homebuilt design. Part 1. Matching the machine to the man.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1989 (v.38#1) pg. 37

Selecting a homebuilt design. Part 2. The building situation (space, tools, etc.)
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1989 (v.38#2) pg. 31

Selecting a homebuilt design. Part 3. The airplane.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1989 (v.38#3) pg. 32

AIRCRAFT ACCESSORIES entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT ACCESSORIES
xx   AIRCRAFT

Hand grip (handle) is welded onto the vertical stabilizer spar to facilitate moving of a biplane.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Apr-May 1989 pg. 6

Onboard computer. Tips on installing and using a Timex-Sinclair 1000 computer in the cockpit of an airplane to assist the pilot with navigation, calculations, etc. Includes a circuit for converting the 14-volt aircraft electrical system to power the computer.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1985 (v.12#3) pg. 56

Advice on selecting and using a supplemental oxygen system.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1987 (v.14#2) pg. 58

Put together a survival kit to carry in your airplane. Includes tools, shelter, food, life support, and first aid. Est. cost: $20.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1983 (v.32#3) pg. 36

Homebuilt smoke oil system for aerobatic aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1983 (v.32#6) pg. 60

A simple anti-collision device for aircraft without electrical systems.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1984 (v.33#11) pg. 22

Tip on making a towbar for a tailwheel aircraft from PVC pipe fittings and aluminum.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1995 (v.44#3) pg. 91

AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION
sa   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- FIBERGLASS & COMPOSITE
sa   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- METAL
sa   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- WOODEN
xx   AIRCRAFT

How to build a World War I Aeroplane. Suggestions on choosing a design, organizing the construction into logical steps, inspection and flying.
AMERICANA Jul-Aug 1980 (v.8#3) pg. 77

Building the Moni motorglider. Part 1.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1983 (v.10#2) pg. 30

Building the Moni motorglider. Part 2.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1983 (v.10#3) pg. 45

BD-5 aircraft. A discussion of some important design and construction modifications that could enhance flight safety.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1983 (v.10#4) pg. 31

Building the Moni motorglider. Part 3.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1983 (v.10#4) pg. 48

Building the Moni motorglider. Part 4.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1983 (v.10#5) pg. 54

Paper work. Under new FAA regulations the rules have changed for certifying your amateur-built aircraft. Here's how to wade through the red tape.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1984 (v.11#5) pg. 26

Construction series. Spencer's air car. Part 1. A sampling of the new building process, modified with simplified assemblies that reduce shop time for the 4-place Spencer Amphibian Air Car Model S-12.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1984 (v.11#8) pg. 64

Glasair construction. Part 1. Assembling the Glasair wing.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1984 (v.11#9) pg. 26

Construction series. Spencer's air car. Part 2. Hardware fabrication and assembly, retractable gear, control systems.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1984 (v.11#10) pg. 52

Glasair construction. Part 2. Fuselage.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Nov 1984 (v.11#11) pg. 26

Construction series. Spencer's air car. Part 3. Construction of the wing.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1984 (v.11#12) pg. 42

Glasair construction. Part 3. Cowling, canopy and mating the wing and fuselage.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1985 (v.12#1) pg. 48

Glasair construction. Part 4. Converting taildragger model to retractable gear model.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1985 (v.12#2) pg. 26

Building the Silhouette. Part 1. Assembling the fuselage.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1985 (v.12#5) pg. 28

Building the Silhouette. Part 2. Assembling the wings.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1985 (v.12#6) pg. 34

Building the Silhouette. Part 3. Tail feathers, canopy, turtleback, and landing gear.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jul 1985 (v.12#7) pg. 50

Building the Acro Sport II. Tips from the EAA on building their two-place, aerobatic, biwing, wood-tube-fabric airplane. Part 1. Introduction to the airplane and tips on gas welding.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1985 (v.12#8) pg. 40

Building the Acro Sport II. Part 2. Assembling the wings.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1985 (v.12#9) pg. 40

Building the Acro Sport II. Part 3. Covering and painting.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1985 (v.12#10) pg. 54

The paper work jungle. Timely pointers for dealing with FAA's paper work and regulatory process when building your own airplane.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1986 (v.13#1) pg. 14

Building to last. Tips on some of the things that cause long-term problems in homebuilt aircraft, and ways to prevent them.
KITPLANES Apr 1997 (v.14#4) pg. 84

Choosing your homebuilt project. A look at the five M's (mission, measurements, materials, money, and motivation) which affect your choice.
KITPLANES May 1999 (v.16#5) pg. 70

Aircraft joints. How effective load distribution at joints and fasteners can save wear and tear on a homebuilt. Part 1. Spar joints.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 76

Boosting performance. How aircraft design, construction, and pilot technique determines the result.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 83

Aircraft joints. How effective load distribution at joints and fasteners can save wear and tear on a homebuilt. Part 2. Joints that rely on adhesives or fusing.
KITPLANES Oct 1999 (v.16#10) pg. 92

Clamps and clamping ideas used to speed up aircraft construction. Includes tips on building or modifying clamps.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1983 (v.32#2) pg. 30

How to get your homebuilt certified without a hassle. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1983 (v.32#4) pg. 39

How to get your homebuilt certified without a hassle. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION May 1983 (v.32#5) pg. 24

Jig for locating the positions of holes in the top cowling or cockpit decking through which cabane rolling wires must pass on a parasol monoplane or biplane.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1983 (v.32#8) pg. 43

Method for checking alignment with a water level made of plastic tubing.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1983 (v.32#11) pg. 26

A few good measuring tips for use when constructing aircraft, or any other project which requires accuracy.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1986 (v.35#7) pg. 27

Maintaining alignment during construction of aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1986 (v.35#9) pg. 29

What needs to be learned to build an airplane and where to find that knowledge and/or skill. Some advice.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1989 (v.38#9) pg. 38

Useful hints that can ease builder problems. Tips include the preparation of "gotta do" lists, spray painting small parts, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1989 (v.38#11) pg. 37

Tips for the airplane homebuilder. (1) Alignment of pulleys and their guides. (2) Quick, accurate transfer punch. (3) Avoid scratching aluminum when cutting, bending, ... (4) Smoothing aluminum edges. (5)Cleco blocks to raise work piece. (6) Hollow bucking rod for removing rivets. (7) Improving trammel points. (8) File handle for use on flat surfaces.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1990 (v.39#2) pg. 90

Keeping your homebuilt aircraft costs down. Some tips.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1991 (v.40#9) pg. 29

Logical sequence for building or assembling a homebuilt aircraft is discussed.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1993 (v.42#11) pg. 69

Life before there were kits. Plans built aircraft and the search for low cost building. Part 1. A realistic look at the costs of building an aircraft from plans versus from a kit.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1994 (v.43#9) pg. 29

Before it goes to the airport. A review of all items which should be completed and/or checked before hauling your homebuilt aircraft to the airport for final assembly and FAA certification inspection.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1994 (v.43#10) pg. 86

Life before there were kits. Plans built aircraft and the search for low cost building. Part 2. Deciding on what plane to build, construction methods, work space, tools, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1994 (v.43#10) pg. 98

Aircraft building. Rules and regulations of airplane building.
SPORT AVIATION May 1997 (v.46#5) pg. 90

Aircraft building. Advice on preparing for the undertaking and understanding what lies ahead.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1997 (v.46#6) pg. 86

Aircraft building. (1) Determining what type of airplane to build. (2) Basics of building a tube and fabric airplane. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1997 (v.46#7) pg. 94

Aircraft building. Basics of building a tube and fabric airplane. Part 2. Covering and finishing.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1997 (v.46#8) pg. 100

Homebuilding tips focus on the details.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1999 (v.48#2) pg. 117

Getting started in aircraft building. Part 1. Why build an airplane, what to build, and what is required to build an airplane.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1999 (v.48#10) pg. 109

Getting started in aircraft building. Part 2. What you should do before building an aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1999 (v.48#11) pg. 106

Getting started in aircraft building. Part 3. Selecting which aircraft to build.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1999 (v.48#12) pg. 108

AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- FIBERGLASS & COMPOSITE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- FIBERGLASS & COMPOSITE
xx   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION
xx   FIBERGLASS & COMPOSITE
xx   PLASTIC

Tip on positioning strips of cloth in hard to reach places.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jan-Mar 1990 pg. 6

Tip on using expanding foam as an adhesive to attach foam to foam, metal, glass, etc.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 11

Tip on applying the initial coats of feather fill.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 11

How to make lightweight structural tubes (0.5" to 6" diameter) by molding fiberglass and epoxy over plastic pipe.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Dec 1991-Feb 1992 pg. 8

Tip on identifying and saving samples of epoxy mixtures used in aircraft construction.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS May-Aug 1993 pg. 8

Repairing holes in composite (fiberglass) skins using Clark foam and 3 BID.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Spring 1994 pg. 10

Tips on mixing and using PTM&W epoxy in composite aircraft construction. Includes arm adjustment to convert Michael's Engineering Stick Stuff Dispenser (pump) to the correct proportions.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Mar 1995 pg. 10
Correction E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Spring 1995 pg. 5 (Pump arm dimension)

Composites 101. A brief overview of new materials, techniques and tips for the average aircraft builder to make the process easier.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Spring 1996 pg. 5

Tip on using an inflated balloon to hold fiberglass into curved shapes during curing.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Summer 1996 pg. 6

Tip on heating a composite canard in order to remove warpage.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Summer 1997 pg. 7

Composite basics. Part 1. An introduction to the various fibers (glass, carbon, and Kevlar) and the fiber/resin interface.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1983 (v.10#2) pg. 27

Composite basics. Part 2. Choosing between fibers. The weave and the cost.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1983 (v.10#3) pg. 34

Composite basics. Part 3. Choosing materials for the core of the structural sandwich.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1983 (v.10#4) pg. 42

Composite basics. Part 4. Carving and forming core materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1983 (v.10#5) pg. 39

Composite basics. Part 5. Understanding the resin matrix.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1983 (v.10#6) pg. 52

Composite basics. Part 6. Open layup vs. vacuum molding.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jul 1983 (v.10#7) pg. 60

Composite basics. Part 7. Tools for fiber and epoxy. A look at jigs, fixtures, patterns, templates, models, molds, vacuum molding, etc.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1983 (v.10#8) pg. 22

Composite basics. Part 8. Designing with sandwich structures in order to meet load and stress requirements.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1983 (v.10#9) pg. 52

Composite basics. Part 9. Stresses and loads. How composite sandwich structures carry loads. Special considerations for amateur aircraft designers.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1983 (v.10#10) pg. 60

Composite basics. Part 9 (continued). Stresses and loads (continued).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Nov 1983 (v.10#11) pg. 34

Paper planes. Description of a radical new sandwich structure technique combining paper, fiberglass cloth and polyester resin.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1983 (v.10#12) pg. 28

Composite basics. Part 10. The basic theory of adhesives, adherents and bonding for the union between structural materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1983 (v.10#12) pg. 56

Composite basics. Part 10. (Continued). More theory on adhesives, adherents and bonding techniques related to aircraft structures.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1984 (v.11#1) pg. 28

Which sandwich? A comparative analysis of the various types of composite structures and the costs of each.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1984 (v.11#2) pg. 22

Composite questions. Answers to some specific controversies concerning strength and load capabilities of fiber and epoxy structures.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1984 (v.11#2) pg. 50

Composite basics. Part 11. Load testing. Some critical guidelines for verifying stress and load capabilites.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1984 (v.11#3) pg. 42

Composite basics. Part 12. Composite connections. The fine points of designing and installing load-carrying fittings and attachment points to work with sandwich structures.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1984 (v.11#4) pg. 60

Words of warning and advice on building composite fuel tanks.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1984 (v.11#5) pg. 12

Composite basics. Part 12 (continued). Fittings and attachments.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1984 (v.11#5) pg. 24

Paper planes controversary. Can common wood-pulp products make a safe transition from drawing board to actual flight as core material for composite aircraft?
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1984 (v.11#6) pg. 18

Composite basics. Part 13. Where to turn for advanced education and information on designing and building with composite materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1984 (v.11#6) pg. 54

Composite basics. A look at the controversary surrounding style 7715 fabric produced by Hexcel Corp. and Burlington Industries Inc.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jul 1984 (v.11#7) pg. 42

Composite basics. Do it yourself quality testing. How to verify the strength of fabric and resin combinations with a simple at-home technique.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1984 (v.11#8) pg. 72
Correction HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1984 (v.11#10) pg. 42

Hot-wire act. Common sense and a few simple building materials are used to create a work-saving foam cutter.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1984 (v.11#10) pg. 22

Composite basics. Strength of the matter. Two methods for determining the strength values of fibers used in composite structure design calculations.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1984 (v.11#10) pg. 42

Composite basics. Honeycomb vs. foam.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Nov 1984 (v.11#11) pg. 54

Composite basics. Honeycomb vs. foam (continued).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1984 (v.11#12) pg. 56

Composite basics. How to evaluate the structural reliability of composite aircraft parts following a fire within an enclosed building.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1985 (v.12#1) pg. 52

Composites: Back to basics. How to choose the best core material with the best fibers for your advanced composite project.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1985 (v.12#2) pg. 46

Composites: Sandwich-structure materials, design considerations, finishing and general guidelines. Part 1. Graphite and fiberglass materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1985 (v.12#3) pg. 37

Composites: Sandwich-structure materials, design considerations, finishing and general guidelines. Part 2. Kevlar and epoxies.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1985 (v.12#4) pg. 42

Kevlar fabrication. Part 1. How to make a wet lay-up using the table-top vacuum-bag procedure.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1985 (v.12#5) pg. 42

Composite basics: Should you switch materials?
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1985 (v.12#5) pg. 50

Kevlar fabrication. Part 2. How to cut, drill and grind this "wonder material."
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1985 (v.12#6) pg. 38

Composites: Sandwich-structure materials, design considerations, finishing and general guidelines. Part 3. Yarns, fibers, etc.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1985 (v.12#6) pg. 58

Don't expose yourself. Safety procedures for working with composite materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1985 (v.12#12) pg. 26

Composite aircraft design (book review with excerpts).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1986 (v.13#3) pg. 48

The leading edge of composites. An easier way to form leading edges and tips for wood-and-fabric wings is by using composite materials.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1986 (v.13#5) pg. 45

Composite revolution. How new construction materials are revolutionizing the design and construction of homebuilt aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jul 1986 (v.13#7) pg. 18

Starting a Glasair. Description of the process involved in assembling the Stoddard-Hamilton starter kit to construct the Glasair rudder.
KITPLANES Jul 1993 (v.10#7) pg. 7

Tips on how composite aircraft materials can be designed to take pressure loads. Design research information is taken from pressurization tests for the Lancair IV.
KITPLANES Jan 1994 (v.11#1) pg. 66

Make your own fiberglass parts. A step-by-step guide to making molded fiberglass parts (cowl, instrument panel, heater box, etc.).
KITPLANES Jan 1997 (v.14#1) pg. 68

Shopsheet. Very basic composite constructions hints.
KITPLANES Mar 1997 (v.14#3) pg. 43

How to bond composite joints. What you need to know about gluing fiberglass parts together.
KITPLANES Jun 1997 (v.14#6) pg. 84

Getting it together. Advice on checking the design for mechanical joining (such as bolting or riveting) of composite components.
KITPLANES Sep 1997 (v.14#9) pg. 28

Resin transfer molding. How you can build autoclave-quality composite parts at home.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 48

Repair of non-structural polyester-based fiberglass parts on aircraft. Step-by-step instructions.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1989 (v.11#4) pg. 11

Roll your own tail cone. How to remove a damaged plastic rudder butt, make a plaster of Paris mold for a new butt, and then make a new one from fiberglass and resin.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1996 (v.18#1) pg. 6
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1996 (v.18#6) pg. 4

Polyfix repair. Using thermal fusion for quick and easy repair of porous and nonporous aircraft plastics.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1998 (v.20#10) pg. 16
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1999 (v.21#1) pg. 3

Hints on using a nickel-coated, carbon-fiber fabric from "Thermion" in composite aircraft construction to serve as an electrical ground for wet-wing fuel tanks.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1998 (v.20#11) pg. 5
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1999 (v.21#1) pg. 4

How the new homebuilt ultralights take shape. What is available in kits and plans. Information on how foam wings are fabricated.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1980 (v.154#1) pg. 80

Suspended hot wire "saw" for cutting foam cores when building composite aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1983 (v.32#9) pg. 63

Making molds for laminating/forming quality aircraft parts. Part 1. Template making and line generating techniques.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1984 (v.33#8) pg. 36

Making molds for laminating/forming quality aircraft parts. Part 2. Mold construction.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1984 (v.33#9) pg. 22

How to make a form to fabricate a fiberglass turtledeck.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1985 (v.34#9) pg. 67

Suggestions and guidelines for the selection and use of advanced composites.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1986 (v.35#4) pg. 63

One method for making fiberglass fairings for gear legs or wing roots.
SPORT AVIATION May 1986 (v.35#5) pg. 39

Constructing better leading edges and wingtips on conventional wood-and-fabric wings by using composite materials and techniques.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1986 (v.35#8) pg. 63

Vacuum bagging technique for achieving a 40% epoxy and 60% cloth ratio when making fiberglass components.
SPORT AVIATION May 1988 (v.37#5) pg. 42

Controversy over gluing together separate blocks of urethane foam to form a "solid" block for use as a wing core or spar web.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1989 (v.38#1) pg. 42
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Apr 1989 (v.38#4) pg. 4

Composite fuel tanks. Photos and description of the procedures for constructing composite (fiberglass) fuel tanks.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1989 (v.38#12) pg. 41

Using a router table to cut PVC foam ribs. A Masonite template is attached to the foam and a simple guide pin traces the outline as the foam is fed into the router bit.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1991 (v.40#3) pg. 67

Composite beam (wing spar) design using a computer spreadsheet program.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1991 (v.40#7) pg. 61
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Jan 1992 (v.41#1) pg. 95

Working with ready-made fiberglass parts. Part 1. Advice on cutting, fitting, modifying, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1991 (v.40#11) pg. 84
Correction SPORT AVIATION Jan 1992 (v.41#1) pg. 48

Working with ready-made fiberglass parts. Part 2. Cowling installation.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1991 (v.40#12) pg. 82

Structural testing of homebuilts. Why and how to perform load testing of composite aircraft wings and interpret the results.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1992 (v.41#3) pg. 33

Prevent oversize screw holes in removable fiberglass cowling and panels by installing tinnerman washers to reinforce around the hole.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1994 (v.43#3) pg. 93

Electrical schematic for building a hotwire tool for cutting foam cores for various aircraft components. Two different style wire-holders are pictured.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1994 (v.43#7) pg. 97

The carbon fiber scene. A brief introduction to the current status of carbon fiber in homebuilt aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1994 (v.43#8) pg. 76

Tip on fabricating fiberglass straps (clamps) to attach wire bundles to the inside of composite structures.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1995 (v.44#1) pg. 105

Tip on fabricating a rib (or former) to be placed inside a fin or rudder in such a manner as to ensure a good fit.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1995 (v.44#1) pg. 105

What you should know about fiberglass, resins, sanding, gel coat, ... etc. before you try your hand with fiberglass.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1996 (v.45#2) pg. 83

Tip on modifying a heavy-duty electrical soldering gun for use in shaping (or removing) Styrofoam.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1997 (v.46#6) pg. 104

Warning on the need for air vents in sealed composite structures.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1997 (v.46#6) pg. 111

Aircraft building. Basics of building a composite airplane. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1997 (v.46#10) pg. 92
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Dec 1997 (v.46#12) pg. 4

Aircraft building. Basics of building a composite airplane. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1997 (v.46#11) pg. 96
Correction SPORT AVIATION Jan 1998 (v.47#1) pg. 95

Mold making. Using vinylester resin and fiberglass cloth to make the mold (or tooling) from a male or female plug.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1997 (v.46#11) pg. 116

Aircraft building. Basics of building a composite airplane. Part 3.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1997 (v.46#12) pg. 90

Tip on removing fiberglass resin from the eyes of a piano hinge.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1998 (v.47#6) pg. 113

Basics of composite construction. Part 1. Workshop space, tools, core materials, reinforcement materials, and resins.
SPORT AVIATION May 1999 (v.48#5) pg. 105

Basics of composite construction. Part 2. Fillers, safety issues, and basic layups.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1999 (v.48#6) pg. 102

Basics of composite construction. Part 3. Peel ply and bonding.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1999 (v.48#7) pg. 100

Basics of composite construction. Part 4. Preparation of composite parts, amine blush, hardpoints, and post curing.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1999 (v.48#8) pg. 91

Basics of composite construction. Part 5. Vacuum bagging, prepregs, and finishing.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1999 (v.48#9) pg. 97

AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- METAL entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- METAL
sa   AIRCRAFT WELDING
sa   RIVET
xx   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION
xx   METAL & METALWORKING

An adjustable wooden jig to facilitate cutting notches in aircraft tubing.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Sep 1989 pg. 4

Lathe technique for shaping the end of aircraft tubing so it butts tightly against another tube.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jan-Mar 1990 pg. 2

Metal dimpling table allows dimple countersinks to be made much further into a sheet of metal than a hand rivet squeezer would allow.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jan-Mar 1990 pg. 8

Controversy over using a slide-in, glued-in plug to reinforce aircraft tubing is viewed.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Sep-Nov 1990 pg. 3

Tip on using less expensive 1018 to 1025 steels (in place of 4130 steel) in the construction of homebuilt aircraft. Includes a chart of aircraft steels, their SAE numbers, shapes, general uses, etc.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Sep-Nov 1991 pg. 11, 12

Tips on cleaning, priming and top coating steel aircraft tubing.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Mar-Apr 1993 pg. 9

Drill press jig for cutting a fishmouth in the end of aircraft tubing using a hole saw.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS May-Aug 1993 pg. 6

How to drill very accurate round holes for critical applications of AN bolts.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Fall 1993 pg. 9

Metal bonding. Selection of epoxy and the three conditions needed for a good bond.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Winter 1994 pg. 9

Tip on working 4130 tubing using (1) a "Remgrit" carbide blade to cut to length, (2) a narrow-belt sander to shape within 1/32", and (3) final sizing with a file.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jan 1995 pg. 5

Metal bonding tips. Looks at preparation, cleanliness, clamping, etc.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Mar 1995 pg. 5

No more rivets. How to prepare aluminum surfaces for the process of chemical bonding.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1984 (v.11#1) pg. 20

Fusion welding. Part 1. Examining the options available for the welding of an aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1984 (v.11#8) pg. 24

Fusion welding. Part 2. The oxyacetylene gas welding process.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1984 (v.11#9) pg. 20

Fusion welding. Part 3. Gas tungsten arc welding.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Nov 1984 (v.11#11) pg. 18

The fundamentals of visual weld inspection as it pertains to homebuilt aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1984 (v.11#12) pg. 50

Brazing versus welding. When and where the brazing process should be used instead of conventional welding in aircraft construction.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1985 (v.12#1) pg. 18

Aluminum welding. Part 1. Workshop tips from a master on fusing lightweight aircraft metals with gas and hydrogen.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1985 (v.12#3) pg. 46

Aluminum welding. Part 2. Step-by-step introduction to gas welding of aluminum (continued) plus basic tips on repair.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1985 (v.12#4) pg. 22

Welding primer for aircraft homebuilders (book review with excerpts).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1986 (v.13#8) pg. 50

Shrinking tools and techniques for use in aircraft sheet metal work.
KITPLANES Nov 1992 (v.9#11) pg. 9

Forming sheet metal. Secrets learned from a sheet metal craftsman. Looks at basic forming, working with aluminum alloys, bending, stretching, shrinking, finishing, annealing, and salvaging mistakes.
KITPLANES Jun 1993 (v.10#6) pg. 46

Understanding the basics for working with aluminum tubing in aircraft applications.
KITPLANES Jul 1994 (v.11#7) pg. 60

Shopsheet. Bend radius. Chart gives the normal and minimum bending radius for both 2024 T-3 and 6061 T-6 sheet metal varying in thickness from .016" to .125".
KITPLANES Sep 1996 (v.13#9) pg. 71

Tips on "restoring" (cleaning and polishing) aluminum aircraft "skin" after paint is removed.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1989 (v.11#6) pg. 20

Basic riveting. A skill that every aircraft owner should know. Includes tips on making sheet metal repairs.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1994 (v.16#4) pg. 14

Troubleshooting the effects of animal urine on aluminum.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1994 (v.16#11) pg. 24

Taking a hard line. Tips for metal tubing fabrication that will be right the first time and every time. Part 1. Tube and flare standards and the required tools.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1999 (v.21#3) pg. 18

Taking a hard line. Part 2. Tube bending.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1999 (v.21#4) pg. 7
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1999 (v.21#6) pg. 3, 4
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1999 (v.21#9) pg. 3

Advice on the use of 3M Scotch-Brite abrasive pads on aluminum.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1999 (v.21#9) pg. 22

How to bend hollow steel, copper, or aluminum tubing successfully. Several jigs and bending forms are illustrated.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1983 (v.32#8) pg. 48

Design for a sheet metal brake capable of bending .062 chrome moly with a 1/8" radius.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1983 (v.32#12) pg. 27

Bending sheet metal. Includes a "setback chart", radii charts, and tips on bends in metal fittings.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1984 (v.33#3) pg. 18

Bending metal by "computer". Computer program, written in BASIC, makes use of the generally accepted formulas for setback and bend allowance, and is written to allow you to calculate up to 20 bends on one fitting.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1984 (v.33#4) pg. 42

Metalworking tips. (1) Strap duplicator is used to transfer hole alignment when lap-joining sheet metal. (2) How to flatten tubing ends.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1984 (v.33#10) pg. 76

Homemade hydraulic press (die) to form corrugated aluminum skins for an aircraft. Constructed mostly of wood.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1986 (v.35#2) pg. 66

Bending leading edge aluminum. Several techniques are viewed, including a simple vacuum system consisting of plastic garbage bags and an ordinary vacuum cleaner.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1986 (v.35#4) pg. 61

Flush riveting. Tips on holes, burrs, dimpling, countersinking, riveting, and reverse riveting.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1987 (v.36#4) pg. 34

More aircraft riveting and skinning tips.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1987 (v.36#7) pg. 39

Forming aluminum landing gear for sport aircraft. How to build a die assembly for bending .375" 2024 aluminum plate with a simple hydraulic press.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1988 (v.37#10) pg. 37

Tip: Prevent internal corrosion in steel tube aircraft framework by replacing the air with nitrogen under pressure.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1988 (v.37#12) pg. 60
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Mar 1989 (v.38#3) pg. 65

Tips for the metal aircraft builder. (1) Making and using a dimpling block (bar). (2) Homemade fluting tool. (3) Cutting circular lightening holes with a fly-cutter. (4) Edge finder tool. (5) Assembly jigs. (6) Riveting tips. Includes photos showing assembly of an "RV" aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1989 (v.38#6) pg. 30

Technique for bending and holding the metal leading edge skins of an aircraft wing during installation.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1989 (v.38#6) pg. 60

Tip: Use a veterinary vaccination syringe and needle to inject tube seal into airframes through very small holes. The holes are easily welded shut after treatment.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1989 (v.38#8) pg. 93

Selecting and using a welder on 4130N steel tubing (used in aircraft construction).
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1989 (v.38#10) pg. 64

Simple wooden die to form rudder cable exit fairings from soft aluminum.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1989 (v.38#11) pg. 39

Tip on cutting odd-shape brackets from 4130 steel plate using a scroll saw equipped with a variable speed drive.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1990 (v.39#2) pg. 93

Useful hints when building the RV-6 aircraft. (1) Add a firewall mounted brake reservoir. (2) Drilling the heat treated steel landing gear legs. (3) Cutting and drilling holes in a stainless steel firewall. (4) Assembly tips.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1990 (v.39#3) pg. 29

(1) Correct technique for welding steel fittings that will be under tension of a flying wire. (2) Improved tail spar bushing.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1990 (v.39#8) pg. 59

Shop made "punch and die" to form the raised flanges around lightening holes in aluminum.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1990 (v.39#10) pg. 69

Tip on drawing a full-size pattern for tube bending by using a piece of flexible plastic tubing as a large French curve.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1991 (v.40#1) pg. 76

Sheet metal contouring the easy way. Part 1. An inexpensive, manual technique for imparting a curve to large or small sheets of metal. Requires only a simple jig and a ball-shaped roller. Furniture casters or billiard balls can be adapted for the job.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1991 (v.40#3) pg. 28

Sheet metal contouring the easy way. Part 2. Round linear curve bending. Jig and tool for putting a 190-degree uniformly radiused bend in sheet aluminum for use as the leading edge of an aileron.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1991 (v.40#4) pg. 28

Metal aircraft construction tips and procedures. (1) Hole drilling. (2) Simplified inspection access plates requiring only 2 screws instead of 8. (3) Simplified anchor nut installation for 8-32 screws. (4) Rivet squeezer modification. (5) Reshaping the distorted leading edges of purchased metal ribs.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1991 (v.40#6) pg. 36

Tool uses two ball bearings to put a crease along the edge of a sheet metal component. The crease is used to stiffen the metal and/or for making a very tight-fitting edge such as found on metal fairings.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1991 (v.40#7) pg. 66

Sheet metal contouring the easy way. Part 3. How to make deep non-linear curves in sheet aluminum. These curves are found mostly in "D" tube leading edge sections of airfoils with laminar flow.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1991 (v.40#9) pg. 66

Metal wing jigging and riveting. Some tips.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1992 (v.41#1) pg. 94

Shop-built tool is designed to cold bend the 1/4" 2024T-3 aluminum used to make the aileron horns on biplanes, including the Pitts Special and Acro Sport.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1992 (v.41#9) pg. 90

Metal working tips for the first time builder. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1993 (v.42#1) pg. 66

Plywood jigs for cutting lightening holes in stamped aluminum ribs using a router fitted with a carbide bit.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1993 (v.42#2) pg. 60

Metal working tips for the first time builder. Part 2. Hole drilling.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1993 (v.42#2) pg. 65

Jig for precisely locating and drilling the rivet holes used to secure rod ends to control tubes.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1994 (v.43#2) pg. 92

Drills and drilling. Advice on equipment, jigs, technique, drilling speeds, ... when drilling holes in aircraft tubing, sheet metal, firewalls, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1994 (v.43#4) pg. 94

Tips for steel tube construction. (1) Fixture for welding aileron and flap fittings for controls having round steel spars. (2) Fixture for accurately drilling round steel tubing. (3) Jig fixture for making elevator hinge fittings.
SPORT AVIATION May 1994 (v.43#5) pg. 101

Tip on using flexible magnetic tape and iron filings to visually verify the location of ribs and spars underneath aluminum skin prior to drilling rivet holes.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1994 (v.43#11) pg. 107

Protecting steel aircraft parts from rust.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1995 (v.44#10) pg. 86

Forming aluminum into compound curves, a skill required when making strut fairings.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1995 (v.44#11) pg. 88

Working in aluminum. Making a wing root fairing from 3003 H-14 (the same stuff your heating contractor uses).
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1996 (v.45#1) pg. 63

Wooden cage is used to store a roll of aircraft aluminum in either a vertical or horizontal position. Rollers (casters) facilitate pulling out any length required.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1996 (v.45#1) pg. 100

Tips on priming and finishing steel tube aircraft frames to prevent corrosion.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1996 (v.45#1) pg. 107
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Mar 1996 (v.45#3) pg. 105

Aluminum forming. An introduction to the use of the English Wheel.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1996 (v.45#2) pg. 105

Making a radial engine cowling from scratch involves templates, forms and metalworking. Some tips.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1996 (v.45#3) pg. 89

Machine turning (or burnishing) of aluminum for embellishment or decoration. The resulting effect is best associated with the "Spirit of St.Louis" aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1996 (v.45#3) pg. 99

Aircraft building. Basics of building a sheet metal airplane.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1997 (v.46#9) pg. 106

Sheet metalworking tool. Modifying a pair of visegrips to form a flange on a circle-top bulkhead.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1998 (v.47#12) pg. 118

Working with sheet metal. Part 3. Making a replacement nose bowl on a wooden buck (form) that is fabricated by using the original bowl as a pattern.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1999 (v.48#8) pg. 46

An introduction to the family of aircraft aluminum alloys. Part 1. A look at both non-heat treatable alloys and heat treatable alloys.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1999 (v.48#9) pg. 78

Working with sheet metal. Part 4. Making a replacement nose bowl (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1999 (v.48#10) pg. 94

An introduction to the family of aircraft aluminum alloys. Part 2. Annealing.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1999 (v.48#11) pg. 100
Correction SPORT AVIATION Dec 1999 (v.48#12) pg. 8

Working with sheet metal. Part 5. Making a replacement nose bowl (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1999 (v.48#12) pg. 103

Technique for bending 1" diameter steel tubing using a simple wooden jig.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Apr 1992 (v.20#4) pg. 25
Added Info VINTAGE AIRPLANE Jul 1992 (v.20#7) pg. 23

Band-clamp-style tool for installing aluminum leading edge skins.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Sep 1993 (v.21#9) pg. 23

Tip on using small magnets and a needle-on-a-string to determine the exact center before doing blind-drilling through aluminum skins into rib flanges.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Oct 1993 (v.21#10) pg. 7

AIRCRAFT INSURANCE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT INSURANCE
xx   AIRCRAFT
xx   INSURANCE

Risky business. Special considerations you need to be aware of when purchasing insurance for homebuilt aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1984 (v.11#6) pg. 42

Insuring your homebuilt aircraft. An overview of what's available.
KITPLANES Feb 1995 (v.12#2) pg. 51
Added Info KITPLANES May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 2

Choosing insurance for homebuilt aircraft and the impact of aircraft modifications on insurance coverage.
KITPLANES Apr 1999 (v.16#4) pg. 18, 20
Added Info KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 5

Insurance claims. An overview of how aircraft insurance policies are written, how they are interpreted by adjusters, and what your responsibility as an aircraft owner will involve in the event of an accident.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1997 (v.19#3) pg. 4

AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- WOODEN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION -- WOODEN
xx   AIRCRAFT CONSTRUCTION
xx   WOODWORKING

Correct design of a plywood reinforcing plate illustrated.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Apr-May 1989 pg. 7

Tip on selecting an approved glue for use on wooden aircraft.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 3

Tip on measuring wood density and placing wood of differing density when building wooden wing spars.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Dec 1992-Feb 1993 pg. 4

Tips on selecting wood from a marine lumber yard or other non-aviation source.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS May-Aug 1993 pg. 11

Brief explanation of when and why "vertical grain" wood is used.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Summer 1996 pg. 7

Tips on preventing warping of unassembled wooden spars and ribs.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Winter 1997 pg. 8

Wood rib construction. A step-by-step, detail workshop for wing ribs from the EAA professionals.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1984 (v.11#12) pg. 45

Working with wood. Careful planning, preparation, and precision contribute to a successful aircraft project.
KITPLANES Nov 1992 (v.9#11) pg. 52

D-tube wing construction technique is described and illustrated.
KITPLANES Nov 1994 (v.11#11) pg. 70

Shopsheet. Simple woodworking tips on drilling, bending, scarf joints, attaching metal parts, and gluing.
KITPLANES Jun 1997 (v.14#6) pg. 33

Selection and evaluation of wood for aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1984 (v.33#2) pg. 24

A closer look at some alternatives to Sitka spruce in aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1984 (v.33#9) pg. 57

How to construct a scarf joint repair to a wood wing spar.
SPORT AVIATION May 1985 (v.34#5) pg. 60

Tips on selecting and testing wood glues for use in critical projects, such as aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1985 (v.34#10) pg. 21

Plywood in aircraft. What is available and tips on its use.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1986 (v.35#3) pg. 33

Laminating and bending wood. Looks at glues, jigs, clamps, alternatives, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1986 (v.35#6) pg. 28

Constructing better leading edges and wingtips on conventional wood-and-fabric wings by using composite materials and techniques.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1986 (v.35#8) pg. 63

Plywood skinning. How to apply a thin plywood skin to a wing or some other part of an aircraft structure. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION May 1987 (v.36#5) pg. 28

Plywood skinning. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1987 (v.36#6) pg. 29

Plywood steamer. Homebuilt steamer is used for bending 3/32" aircraft plywood skins for the leading edge of a wing.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1988 (v.37#8) pg. 42

Using aircraft quality adhesives. Part 1. Plastic resin glues (Resorcinol and Aerolite 306). Also illustrates clamping details.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1988 (v.37#10) pg. 33

Using aircraft quality adhesives. Part 2. Epoxies. Working with adhesives. Health hazards. Shear joint testing. Laminating.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1988 (v.37#11) pg. 29

Wood ... a forgotten medium? A look at the use of wood in aircraft construction. Part 1. Introduction to wood's characteristics and adhesives.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1989 (v.38#4) pg. 34

Wood ... a forgotten medium? Part 2. Cutting, fitting, storing, etc.
SPORT AVIATION May 1989 (v.38#5) pg. 42

Aerolite. An in-depth look at the urea-formaldehyde chemical reactions behind the primary wood glue used in aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1989 (v.38#6) pg. 27

Why not build a wood aircraft. A look at the benefits of using wood to build low-cost airplanes with a minimum of special tools.
SPORT AVIATION May 1991 (v.40#5) pg. 71

Building the Horizon. Step-by-step guide to construction of this plans-built all-wood tandem aircraft from Aero Visions International. Features folding wings and a choice of engines.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1991 (v.40#6) pg. 47

Clamping system for wooden ribs being fabricated in a jig.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1991 (v.40#9) pg. 64

Joints in aircraft woodworking. Looks at joint preparation, types of joints, use of gussets, gluing, clamping, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1991 (v.40#10) pg. 78

Tip on proper coating of wood components which will be in contact with steel or aluminum.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1993 (v.42#1) pg. 90

Making wood wing ribs. Includes information on a simple cap strip bending block, cap strip soaker, building a rib jig, rib joint options, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1994 (v.43#2) pg. 79

Correct technique for reinforcing joints in plywood skins.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1995 (v.44#12) pg. 78

Wood wings. An introduction to the use of wood construction for aircraft wings.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1996 (v.45#1) pg. 75

Aircraft wood grain slope. How to check the grain direction on the narrow face of a spar.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1996 (v.45#2) pg. 122

About building wood fuselages. Looks at types of fuselages, wood selection, tools, etc.
SPORT AVIATION May 1996 (v.45#5) pg. 73

Aircraft woodwork basics. Looks at glue, grain orientation, line sanding and profiling.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1996 (v.45#9) pg. 75

Faster, accurate rib nailing uses 4" tweezers that have been modified for the job of gripping the tiny nails.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1996 (v.45#9) pg. 104

Information on the choice of wood glue for aircraft use.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1996 (v.45#9) pg. 110
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Dec 1996 (v.45#12) pg. 4

Drilling the holes for drag and anti-drag wires in the spars and anchor blocks of a wooden wing is facilitated with an aircraft length drill and an aluminum guide block.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1997 (v.46#11) pg. 114

Technique for removing a glued wing rib from the fixture without risk of damage to the rib or the fixture.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1997 (v.46#12) pg. 114

Jig for accurately drilling the holes for drag and anti-drag wires in the wood wing of an Acro Sport II.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1998 (v.47#3) pg. 96

How to avoid wrinkling in a plywood covering attached to a wooden wing.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1998 (v.47#3) pg. 114

Tips on applying plywood leading edges to wooden wings.
SPORT AVIATION May 1998 (v.47#5) pg. 108

Wooden rib construction practices include a lightweight clamping jig that applies pressure to all of the glued gusset locations during the drying process.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1998 (v.47#8) pg. 116

Scratch building in wood. Tips on locating and machining vertical grain spruce.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1998 (v.47#9) pg. 112

Building with wood. Part 1. Selecting wood suitable for aircraft use.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1998 (v.47#12) pg. 106

Building with wood. Part 2. Inspecting aircraft wood to identify type and any defects.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1999 (v.48#1) pg. 107

Advice on selecting and testing various glues for use in wooden aircraft construction.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1999 (v.48#1) pg. 119

Building with wood. Part 3. Inspecting aircraft wood to identify type and any defects (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1999 (v.48#2) pg. 103

Building with wood. Part 4. (1) Testing wood with a shop-built wood strength tester. (2) Inspecting and repairing older wood.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1999 (v.48#3) pg. 113

Building with wood. Part 5. (1) Aircraft plywood. (2) Adhesives. (3) Finishing.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1999 (v.48#4) pg. 88

Hi-tech jig for assembling wooden ribs is made from acrylic plastic to which the adhesives will not bond.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1999 (v.48#6) pg. 113

AIRCRAFT DESIGN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT DESIGN
sa   WIND TUNNEL
xx   AIRCRAFT

Calculations for homebuilders. How to determine maximum efficiency performance figures for today's advanced technology homebuilts. An introduction. CORR: 40901984.20 p12
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1983 (v.10#12) pg. 34
Correction HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1984 (v.11#2) pg. 12

Water logic. A respected designer discusses the special considerations for conceiving and building amphibious aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1984 (v.11#2) pg. 44

Mini planes and micro computers. Includes two sample programs written in BASIC to assist in aircraft design.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1984 (v.11#3) pg. 28

Modern aircraft design (book review with excerpts).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1986 (v.13#2) pg. 14

Aerodynamicist offers his views on how to approach the problem of developing an original aircraft design. Article covers three general designs: tri-wing, conventional and canard configurations.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1986 (v.13#3) pg. 22

Firewall designs for homebuilt aircraft. Part 1. The FAA burn test, a worst-case scenario.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1986 (v.13#3) pg. 36

Composite aircraft design (book review with excerpts).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1986 (v.13#3) pg. 48

Firewall designs for homebuilt aircraft. Part 2. Burn tests of the most commonly used firewall configurations.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1986 (v.13#4) pg. 44

Firewall designs for homebuilt aircraft. Part 3. The best performing firewalls.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1986 (v.13#5) pg. 36

Coupled lateral/directional maneuvers. Aircraft design to overcome adverse yaw, spirals and Dutch rolls.
KITPLANES Aug 1992 (v.9#8) pg. 7

Four performance charts (based on seven general aviation single-engine aircraft) give you a way of quickly estimating the performance of a unique design or to cross-check a manufacturers performance claims.
KITPLANES Oct 1992 (v.9#10) pg. 76

Aircraft frontal area and its effect on drag.
KITPLANES Nov 1992 (v.9#11) pg. 60

Good engineering practices in homebuilt aircraft. A look at fastener-related problem areas.
KITPLANES Jan 1993 (v.10#1) pg. 14

Advice on the dangers in making unnecessary structural modifications to a homebuilt aircraft.
KITPLANES Feb 1993 (v.10#2) pg. 36
Correction KITPLANES May 1993 (v.10#5) pg. 2

Backside of the power curve phenomenon is explained.
KITPLANES Mar 1993 (v.10#3) pg. 7

Biplanes. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 1.
KITPLANES Apr 1993 (v.10#4) pg. 10

Biplanes. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 2.
KITPLANES May 1993 (v.10#5) pg. 48

Drawing conclusions. An introduction to aircraft drawing and drafting practices.
KITPLANES Jul 1993 (v.10#7) pg. 16

Biplanes. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 3. What you need to know when designing a biplane.
KITPLANES Jul 1993 (v.10#7) pg. 50

Tandem-wing aircraft. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 1. Design tradeoffs.
KITPLANES Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 54

Doing low-cost load testing of aircraft structures using scale models.
KITPLANES Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 78

Designing for flight. How to determine the appropriate amount of stability for a particular aircraft design.
KITPLANES Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 86

Tandem-wing aircraft. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 2. Aerodynamics.
KITPLANES Sep 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 84

Tandem-wing aircraft. A look at the strengths and weaknesses of this design. Part 3. Case study of the famous Mignet Flying Flea design (circa 1933).
KITPLANES Oct 1993 (v.10#10) pg. 7

Glossary of terminology used in aircraft design.
KITPLANES Nov 1993 (v.10#11) pg. 83

Pitch sensitivity in homebuilt aircraft and very small airplanes.
KITPLANES Jan 1994 (v.11#1) pg. 52
Correction KITPLANES Apr 1994 (v.11#4) pg. 4

Making it behave. Designing for proper stall characteristics.
KITPLANES Jan 1994 (v.11#1) pg. 76

Determining the source of longitudinal (pitch) stability problems. Part 1.
KITPLANES Feb 1994 (v.11#2) pg. 58

Determining the source of longitudinal (pitch) stability problems. Part 2.
KITPLANES Mar 1994 (v.11#3) pg. 56

A review of data compiled by NACA (circa 1939-1945) on the nature of drag that can help the light plane designer.
KITPLANES Apr 1994 (v.11#4) pg. 48

Determining the source of longitudinal (pitch) stability problems. Part 3.
KITPLANES Apr 1994 (v.11#4) pg. 56

Determining the source of longitudinal (pitch) stability problems. Part 4. Correcting the problems.
KITPLANES May 1994 (v.11#5) pg. 82

Determining the source of longitudinal (pitch) stability problems. Part 5. Mechanical solutions to stick-force pitch sensitivity problems.
KITPLANES Jun 1994 (v.11#6) pg. 70

Tufting. Visualize the changing airflow patterns around an airplane by taping "tufts" of yarn or string on various outer surfaces and observing (or photographing) their positions.
KITPLANES Sep 1994 (v.11#9) pg. 46

The importance of determining standardized, nondimensionalized test data when conducting an aerodynamic test or analysis.
KITPLANES Nov 1994 (v.11#11) pg. 57

Anatomy of a turn (one of the basic flight maneuvers). Part 1. The forces and phenomena associated with turns.
KITPLANES Dec 1994 (v.11#12) pg. 102

An organized approach to the airplane design process. Part 1. Determining the requirements, mission, goals, constraints, and configuration.
KITPLANES Jan 1995 (v.12#1) pg. 50

An organized approach to the airplane design process. Part 2. Initial design considerations. Selecting the major volumes, preliminary weights, engine/propeller and flying surfaces.
KITPLANES Feb 1995 (v.12#2) pg. 56

An organized approach to the airplane design process. Part 3. Starting the layout process. Initial sketches, spar placement, weight and balance, wing size, etc.
KITPLANES Mar 1995 (v.12#3) pg. 55

An organized approach to the airplane design process. Part 4. Balance and center-of-gravity calculations.
KITPLANES Apr 1995 (v.12#4) pg. 60

An organized approach to the airplane design process. Part 5. Controlling the weight of an aircraft. An examination of useful load, flight envelope, aspect ratio, skin thickness, wetted area, materials, etc.
KITPLANES May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 54

Designing the aircraft fuselage. Looks at force, shear, bending moments, drag, etc.
KITPLANES Jul 1995 (v.12#7) pg. 58

A look at wing position from the designer's point of view. The debate on high-wing vs. low-wing.
KITPLANES Jul 1995 (v.12#7) pg. 74

A look at wing position from the designer's point of view. Wing placement is a key element in aircraft configuration. Looks at the impact on wing bracing, struts, fuel systems, landing gear, etc.
KITPLANES Aug 1995 (v.12#8) pg. 96

A look at wing position from the designer's point of view. Aerodynamics of high-wing vs. low-wing. Looks at drag, wing/fuselage junctions, stall, and lateral stability.
KITPLANES Sep 1995 (v.12#9) pg. 50

Designing sport airplanes. Part 1. Criteria for recreational airplanes.
KITPLANES Feb 1996 (v.13#2) pg. 6

Designing sport airplanes. Part 2. Safety in the design of sport aircraft. Landing considerations.
KITPLANES Mar 1996 (v.13#3) pg. 6

Designing sport airplanes. Part 3. Crash alleviation and crash survivability.
KITPLANES Apr 1996 (v.13#4) pg. 6
Added Info KITPLANES Jun 1996 (v.13#6) pg. 2

Designing sport airplanes. Part 4. Common problems to guard against.
KITPLANES May 1996 (v.13#5) pg. 6

Designing sport airplanes. Part 5. Design and functioning of the cockpit flight controls.
KITPLANES Jun 1996 (v.13#6) pg. 6

Designing sport airplanes. Part 6. Crash survivability (continued).
KITPLANES Aug 1996 (v.13#8) pg. 6

Getting sharp. Sharp edges on aircraft have various effects (mostly bad, but some good). A realistic look at the use of sharp edges in aircraft design.
KITPLANES Aug 1996 (v.13#8) pg. 30

Designing sport airplanes. Part 7. Avoiding aircraft fires.
KITPLANES Sep 1996 (v.13#9) pg. 6

Drag reduction. Reducing external airflow drag rather than adding power.
KITPLANES Jun 1997 (v.14#6) pg. 29

Maneuvering speed. An explanation of a critical airspeed that both designers and pilots need to understand.
KITPLANES Jul 1997 (v.14#7) pg. 66
Correction KITPLANES Sep 1997 (v.14#9) pg. 4

Getting it together. Advice on checking the design for mechanical joining (such as bolting or riveting) of composite components.
KITPLANES Sep 1997 (v.14#9) pg. 28

A tale of tails. There is more to aircraft tail design that might be apparent. A look at stability, location, control, airfoils, mechanical design, trim, and flutter.
KITPLANES Sep 1997 (v.14#9) pg. 98

Aerodynamic effects of open cockpit aircraft are examined.
KITPLANES Nov 1997 (v.14#11) pg. 6

Spins. Part 1. History, accidents, spin training, and the three phases of the spin flight condition.
KITPLANES Mar 1998 (v.15#3) pg. 6

Spins. Part 2. How the design of an aircraft affects spin recovery.
KITPLANES Apr 1998 (v.15#4) pg. 6

Spins. Part 3. Design of tail surfaces for spin recovery.
KITPLANES May 1998 (v.15#5) pg. 6

Spins. Part 4. Preventive design measures.
KITPLANES Jun 1998 (v.15#6) pg. 71

Spins. Part 5. Foiling stalls. The aerodynamics of rotation and stalls.
KITPLANES Jul 1998 (v.15#7) pg. 22

Beyond maneuvering speed. A look at the flight envelope for more information on load limits of aircraft design.
KITPLANES Jul 1998 (v.15#7) pg. 78

Airborne vortices pose interesting problems (and solutions) for aircraft designers. A look at wingtip vortices, vortex generators, etc.
KITPLANES Nov 1998 (v.15#11) pg. 68

The dynamics of turning an aircraft and the options available to an aircraft designer for minimizing the problems caused by adverse yaw.
KITPLANES Jan 1999 (v.16#1) pg. 86

Balancing act. An explanation of the difference between static and dynamic balance in aircraft control surface design.
KITPLANES Mar 1999 (v.16#3) pg. 76

Aerodynamic design considerations for short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft.
KITPLANES Mar 1999 (v.16#3) pg. 78

The aerodynamics of an airfoil stall.
KITPLANES Apr 1999 (v.16#4) pg. 82

Determining wing size when designing aircraft.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 66

Aircraft joints. How effective load distribution at joints and fasteners can save wear and tear on a homebuilt. Part 1. Spar joints.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 76

Boosting performance. How aircraft design, construction, and pilot technique determines the result.
KITPLANES Aug 1999 (v.16#8) pg. 83

Pitch trim and how it affects the forward c.g. limit.
KITPLANES Sep 1999 (v.16#9) pg. 68

Aircraft joints. How effective load distribution at joints and fasteners can save wear and tear on a homebuilt. Part 2. Joints that rely on adhesives or fusing.
KITPLANES Oct 1999 (v.16#10) pg. 92

Designing an airplane for safety in the event of an accident.
KITPLANES Nov 1999 (v.16#11) pg. 74

The amateur scientist. A field formula for calculating the speed and flight efficiency of a soaring bird. Based on the work of Paul MacCready, experimenter with human-powered aircraft.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Mar 1985 (v.252#3) pg. 122

Design ideas for a "laminar ultralight" based on the construction of the S-2 powered glider.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1983 (v.32#3) pg. 50

Effects of rain or surface contamination on pitch stability and control of the Rutan Aircraft designs.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1983 (v.32#3) pg. 57

Effects of rain and bugs on flight behavior of tail-first (canard and tandem-wing) airplanes. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION May 1983 (v.32#5) pg. 36

Effects of rain and bugs on flight behavior of tail-first airplanes. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1983 (v.32#6) pg. 48

Effects of rain and bugs on flight behavior of tail-first airplanes. Part 3.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1983 (v.32#7) pg. 61

A look at stall warning devices, both stall strips and stall warning horns.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1983 (v.32#9) pg. 20

Over weight. An analysis of the connection between aircraft weight and load testing of aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1984 (v.33#2) pg. 38

The concentration and distribution of loads in aircraft design.
SPORT AVIATION May 1984 (v.33#5) pg. 34

Structural testing of the Lancair 200. Testing procedures and computer programs are described.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1986 (v.35#1) pg. 20

Dynamic pressure and your airplane.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1986 (v.35#6) pg. 34

Models for test and designing homebuilt aircraft. Tips on building and using radio controlled models as a poor man's "wind tunnel".
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1987 (v.36#1) pg. 58
Correction SPORT AVIATION Mar 1987 (v.36#3) pg. 8

Dynamic modeling. Part 1. Use of free-flight, dynamically-similar models in estimating full scale aircraft behavior.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1987 (v.36#7) pg. 30
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Nov 1987 (v.36#11) pg. 4

Dynamic modeling. Part 2. Testing of structurally-scaled, sacrificial models as an aid to full scale design.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1987 (v.36#8) pg. 59

Design analysis. A critical analysis of Ken Rand's KR-2 homebuilt sportplane.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1988 (v.37#1) pg. 38

Understanding the "flight envelope" of an aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1988 (v.37#3) pg. 42

Designing your homebuilt. John Roncz explains how to use simple spreadsheet computer programs to help design an airplane. Part 1. Wing design.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1990 (v.39#2) pg. 37

Designing your homebuilt. Part 2. Sizing your wings.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1990 (v.39#3) pg. 34

Designing your homebuilt. Part 3. Wing incidence and tail size.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1990 (v.39#4) pg. 23

Designing your homebuilt. Part 4. Forward sweep and the great tire crisis.
SPORT AVIATION May 1990 (v.39#5) pg. 43
Correction SPORT AVIATION Jun 1990 (v.39#6) pg. 41

Designing your homebuilt. Part 5. Questions and answers covering the first 4 articles.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1990 (v.39#6) pg. 41
Correction SPORT AVIATION Aug 1990 (v.39#8) pg. 36

Designing your homebuilt. Part 6. Tail incidence.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1990 (v.39#8) pg. 36
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Sep 1990 (v.39#9) pg. 93

Designing your homebuilt. Part 7. Tail incidence (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1990 (v.39#9) pg. 35

Designing your homebuilt. Part 8. Tail incidence (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1990 (v.39#10) pg. 45

Designing your homebuilt. Part 9. Tail incidence (continued).
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1990 (v.39#11) pg. 41

Designing your homebuilt. Part 10. Ground effect.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1990 (v.39#12) pg. 37

Designing your homebuilt. Part 11. Canards or three surface airplanes. How they work and what you need to know in order to design an unconventional airplane.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1991 (v.40#1) pg. 57

Designing your homebuilt. Part 12. Evolution of a homebuilt design. Changes since the May 1990 "final" design and the reasons for them.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1991 (v.40#2) pg. 29

Composite beam (wing spar) design using a computer spreadsheet program.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1991 (v.40#7) pg. 61
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Jan 1992 (v.41#1) pg. 95

Structural testing of homebuilts. Why and how to perform load testing of composite aircraft wings and interpret the results.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1992 (v.41#3) pg. 33

Wing strength and its torsional stiffness. What can be learned about aircraft design by testing a wing all the way to destruction.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1992 (v.41#7) pg. 50

Drag reduction possibilities. The four ways to reduce drag are discussed. Ideas for cowls, wheel pants, control surface gaps, exhaust pipes, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1992 (v.41#9) pg. 72

Computerized stress analysis of three-dimensional steel tube airframes. An introduction to using PC computers for this task.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1993 (v.42#8) pg. 58

Designing the horizontal tail. Excerpts from "The Basic Glider Criteria Handbook". Design ideas apply to all movable tail surfaces for either glider or powered aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1994 (v.43#6) pg. 86

Minimizing fuselage drag.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1996 (v.45#8) pg. 64

Inverse pressure gradient matching ... and other ideas for designing fast, low wing airplanes that climb and turn quickly.
SPORT AVIATION May 1997 (v.46#5) pg. 61
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Mar 1998 (v.47#3) pg. 65

Laminar flow fuselages with pusher configuration propellers. A look at the implications of this design concept.
SPORT AVIATION May 1997 (v.46#5) pg. 95

An analysis of the roll reversal exhibited by some aircraft. A look at the inextricable link between the lateral (roll) axis and the directional (yaw) axis.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1998 (v.47#1) pg. 96

Roll damping. A look at the physical factors which determine an airplane's roll behavior between the time the aileron deflection is changed and the new steady-state roll rate is achieved.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1998 (v.47#8) pg. 71

Dynamic analysis of two pusher aircraft. Applying Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis to see what can be learned from two unique designs.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1998 (v.47#8) pg. 92

How airplanes fly. A physical description of lift.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1999 (v.48#2) pg. 85
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Apr 1999 (v.48#4) pg. 4

AIRCRAFT HARDWARE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT HARDWARE
sa   RIVET
sa   SAFETY WIRE
xx   AIRCRAFT
xx   HARDWARE & FASTENER

Tip on varnishing all holes in wooden spars before installing metal bolts in order to eliminate bolt corrosion.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Dec 1992-Feb 1993 pg. 3

How to drill very accurate round holes for critical applications of AN bolts.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Fall 1993 pg. 9

Tip on keeping a U-shaped aileron, elevator or rudder hinge from twisting and binding (on a wooden airfoil)
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Spring 1994 pg. 5

Tip on coating bolts (inserted into wooden spars) to avoid corrosion.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Spring 1994 pg. 11

Tip on using paint dots to mark fasteners which have been tightened and torqued.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Mar 1995 pg. 8

Bolts for the blue. An explanation of the numbering/coding scheme used in aircraft fasteners.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1986 (v.13#1) pg. 46
Added Info HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT May 1986 (v.13#5) pg. 59

Shopsheet. Diagrams illustrate the basic installation concepts for aircraft bolts.
KITPLANES Apr 1996 (v.13#4) pg. 88

Shopsheet. Diagrams illustrate the basic components and numbering scheme for aircraft turnbuckles.
KITPLANES May 1996 (v.13#5) pg. 79

Shopsheet. Edge margin. Diagram and chart illustrate the minimum distance that a bolt hole should be placed from either the edge of a piece of metal or another hole.
KITPLANES Aug 1996 (v.13#8) pg. 34

Shopsheet. Aircraft turnbuckle assemblies and associated AN numbers.
KITPLANES May 1997 (v.14#5) pg. 63

How to unstick stuck fasteners (screws) holding aircraft cowls, inspection plates, and other metal-to-metal connections.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1987 (v.9#5) pg. 18

Understanding aircraft hardware. An explanation of the numbers, letters and marks used to identify aircraft nuts, bolts, and washers.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1988 (v.10#4) pg. 14

Tip on which aircraft screws can (and can't) be owner-replaced using stainless steel hardware.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1990 (v.12#10) pg. 18

Fastener torque. Mythology vs. methodology.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1991 (v.13#7) pg. 11

Tips on drilling out and replacing old Rivnuts.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1995 (v.17#7) pg. 22

New threads for stripped fasteners. Installing a Helicoil is described in detail.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1995 (v.17#10) pg. 11

Aircraft hardware. An overview of the nuts, bolts, screws, and rivets that are approved for use in aircraft.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1999 (v.21#6) pg. 15

Aircraft hardware. Understanding what the real stuff looks like and where to get it.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Dec 1999 (v.21#12) pg. 10

National Aerospace Standards (NAS) fasteners. How to identify NAS bolts and screws which are replacing the older AN Standard items in aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1983 (v.32#1) pg. 56

Chart of maximum loads for AN fasteners.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1983 (v.32#7) pg. 41

Sportplane builder. The installation and use of piano hinges.
SPORT AVIATION May 1985 (v.34#5) pg. 16

Sportplane builder. Are you using your aircraft hardware correctly? Looks at bolts, machine screws, eye bolts, turnbuckles and rod ends.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1985 (v.34#6) pg. 22

How to make protective shields for firewall openings and grommets.
SPORT AVIATION May 1989 (v.38#5) pg. 36

Tip on making standoffs for wires, cables and hoses from short lengths of automotive type fuel line.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1991 (v.40#6) pg. 74

Tip on using wedge-shaped washers under the bolt heads and nuts for the vertical bolts through spars.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1991 (v.40#9) pg. 63

Combine ring-type electrical terminals, plastic tie-wraps, and pop rivets to hang wires and static line tubing from the inside of a fuselage.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1991 (v.40#12) pg. 88

Tip on getting a clean cut through the threads of a drag and anti-drag wire which will not damage the threads.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1992 (v.41#10) pg. 106
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Dec 1992 (v.41#12) pg. 4

Jig for drilling holes through a wooden wing spar so that they exactly match up with the holes in the metal fitting being attached. Drilling uses only a portable electric drill.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1993 (v.42#7) pg. 72

Anchor nuts. Where to use them. Selecting the right kind of anchor nut. Installing anchor nuts.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1994 (v.43#3) pg. 72

Tip on using flexible PVC drip-irrigation tubing to protect aircraft wiring, fuel lines, vernier control cables, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1995 (v.44#6) pg. 102

Strap hinges for tail feathers on homebuilt tube and fabric aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1996 (v.45#6) pg. 104

Tip on using a polyethylene bearing to support the hinge tube attached to an aileron, rudder, or elevator.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1997 (v.46#6) pg. 112

Making shotgun stock. Make hinges from mig welded tubing that slips over the spar and allows aligning of elevator and rudder prior to welding hinges in place.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1997 (v.46#10) pg. 114

Aircraft hardware. Part 1. Bolts, nuts, washers, cotter pins and safety wire.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1998 (v.47#3) pg. 102

Aircraft hardware. Part 2. Rivets, screws, turnlock fasteners, O-rings, gaskets, grommets, clamps, and piano hinges.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1998 (v.47#4) pg. 107

Control cable assemblies. Looks at cable, hardware, fabrication, installation, and inspection.
SPORT AVIATION May 1998 (v.47#5) pg. 92

Proper use of a clevis bolt, thimble, and shackle to form an aircraft fitting which rotates.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1998 (v.47#8) pg. 113

Simple method for safetying the jam nut on a rod-end bearing.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1999 (v.48#1) pg. 122

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE & REPAIR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   AIRCRAFT INSPECTION
xx   AIRCRAFT

Tip on using vinyl tape to make minor skin repairs on fabric or metal.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jun-Aug 1990 pg. 3

Tips on spotting bogus aircraft parts.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Summer 1994 pg. 6

Tips on things to look for when doing preventive maintenance on your aircraft.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1983 (v.10#8) pg. 33

Rigging your airplane to follow the straight and narrow path takes just a little know how and some heads-up flying.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Dec 1986 (v.13#12) pg. 22

A guide to the most noteworthy maintenance-related advisory circulars available from the FAA.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1987 (v.9#6) pg. 14
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1987 (v.9#9) pg. 4

Tools and spare parts any cross-country pilot should have in the airplane.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1987 (v.9#8) pg. 9

Ten tips to prepare the "cold-sensitive" parts of your airplane for winter.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1987 (v.9#10) pg. 4

Tips on how an airplane owner can trim the cost of an annual inspection which may require numerous corrosion-related repairs.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1988 (v.10#7) pg. 19
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1988 (v.10#10) pg. 5

Tail inspection tips for the Cessna 180/185.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1988 (v.10#7) pg. 20

Advice to airplane owners on the need for periodic cowl removal and a thorough inspection of your engine compartment.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1988 (v.10#8) pg. 7

Tip on bypassing the restriction placed on licensed Repair Stations as it pertains to installing salvage parts.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1989 (v.11#1) pg. 20

Advice on aircraft drain holes and the importance of keeping them clear.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1989 (v.11#6) pg. 6
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1989 (v.11#7) pg. 2

Tip: Use high-temperature silicone sealant on engine baffle strips, spark plug wires, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1989 (v.11#7) pg. 17

Advice on the "legal" status of both logged and unlogged owner-performed minor repairs.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1989 (v.11#10) pg. 19

Advice on which aircraft maintenance records you are required to submit to the NTSB or FAA on demand.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1989 (v.11#11) pg. 2

Making safety-wire safe. How to select and install safety wire using acceptable practices.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1989 (v.11#11) pg. 14

Crack repair secrets of the experts. How to stop-drill, patch and reinforce cracks in metal parts. Includes instructions on adding another inspection cover instead of a patch.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1990 (v.12#4) pg. 15

Reader-recommended owner assist shops. Names and addresses of aircraft maintenance shops where aircraft owners can work on their own planes under the supervision of a certified mechanic.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1990 (v.12#8) pg. 12

How to avoid the most common and costly owner-maintenance mistakes when dealing with brakes, spark plugs, oil filters, tires, mags, cleaning, safety wire, and tools.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1991 (v.13#6) pg. 8

Advice on which aircraft maintenance may legally be performed by an owner.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1992 (v.14#4) pg. 24

Cessna 172 Skyhawk owner's survival guide. An overview of the special maintenance requirements for this aircraft. Includes a summary of all airworthiness directives.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1993 (v.15#4) pg. 23

Back-country readiness. Tips on making sure an aircraft is ready for a trip into the wilderness for fishing, camping, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1995 (v.17#10) pg. 14

More advice from the ongoing war against cracks in aircraft skins. When to patch a crack, rivets to be used, cracks in plastic fairings, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1996 (v.18#2) pg. 14

Tips on using 3M's 1300-L rubber and gasket adhesive on aircraft carpet, upholstery, deice boots, or door seals.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1996 (v.18#9) pg. 18

Vibration analysis. What to look for when your airplane vibrates. Troubleshooting the three primary sources of abnormal vibration (propeller, engine, control surfaces).
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1997 (v.19#9) pg. 14

Sheet metal repair. A series offering expert advice for working with Alclad. Part 1. Making an aluminum skin patch.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1999 (v.21#5) pg. 5

Proper techniques for jacking up an airplane. Includes instructions for making an aircraft jack from a standard automobile jack stand and a small hydraulic jack. Includes tips on installing built-in jack points.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1983 (v.32#3) pg. 23

Do it yourself maintenance. A look at permissable aircraft maintenance which may be performed by the owner-operator under FAR part 43, Appendix A without an A&P license.
SPORT AVIATION May 1983 (v.32#5) pg. 56

Aircraft post-winter inspection checklist.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1985 (v.34#4) pg. 53

Cockpit classroom. Fueling and servicing general aviation aircraft. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1986 (v.35#6) pg. 55

Cockpit classroom. Fueling and servicing general aviation aircraft. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1986 (v.35#7) pg. 24

Tips on simple things you can do to keep "in tune" with your airplane and prevent problems from developing.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1986 (v.35#8) pg. 66

Mixing winter flying, with oil, fuel, and water. Tips on preparing your aircraft for safe winter flying.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1986 (v.35#12) pg. 56

Preventing water damage in aircraft. Emphasis is on controlling condensation.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1988 (v.37#7) pg. 63

Tip on checking and reinforcing the Bowers Fly Baby spar connection at Station 5.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1991 (v.40#10) pg. 13

Maintaining a production airplane. A look at preventative maintenance which can legally be performed by an aircraft owner and the associated logbook entry. Part 1.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1998 (v.47#6) pg. 90

Maintaining a production airplane. Part 2.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1998 (v.47#7) pg. 106

Repairing the Aeronca Champ tail post which can be damaged by spinning the aircraft at the end of the runway prior to takeoff. These same torsional forces can damage the tail post of other conventional-gear welded tube fuselages.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Jan 1994 (v.22#1) pg. 27

Replacing rusty lower longerons. Includes instructions for fabricating a special drill bit that will grind away the stub of the longeron right to the center of the supporting weld cluster.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Mar 1994 (v.22#3) pg. 24

AIRCRAFT PROPELLER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT PROPELLER
sa   AIRCRAFT SPINNER
x   PROPELLER (AIRCRAFT)
xx   AIRCRAFT

Tips on polishing -vs- painting a propeller.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Apr-May 1990 pg. 5

Handcrafting your own prop. Part 4. Carving and drilling the wooden propeller blank to shape. Some tips.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1983 (v.10#3) pg. 56

Handcrafting your own prop. Part 5. Balancing and finishing. Some tips.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1983 (v.10#4) pg. 45

Ye olde prop carver. A step-by-step look at the science and art of carving blades that complements your mix of air frame and power plant.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1984 (v.11#6) pg. 50

Proper props for your "power train." How to choose the best fixed-pitch propeller/engine combination for top performance.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1985 (v.12#1) pg. 36
Added Info HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1985 (v.12#4) pg. 13
Added Info HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jun 1985 (v.12#6) pg. 14

Basics of propeller carving. With proper tables and calculations, a good set of basic tools (and a couple of special ones), you can make your own unique propeller.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1985 (v.12#2) pg. 36

Chip off the old prop. Tips on using a home-built carving machine to fabricate wooden propellers. The carving machine uses an existing prop as the template. A router does the actual cutting.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Aug 1985 (v.12#8) pg. 28

Prop talk. Discussion of prop design, plus tips on how to tell if your propeller is out of balance.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1986 (v.13#1) pg. 55

Proper propeller care. The "ten commandments" of wooden prop care.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Oct 1986 (v.13#10) pg. 40

Safe technique for making static-thrust tests on fixed-pitch propellers.
KITPLANES Oct 1992 (v.9#10) pg. 42

Aerodynamic effects of propellers on the stability, control and trim of an airplane. Part 1. Thrust lines.
KITPLANES Jul 1994 (v.11#7) pg. 54

Aerodynamic effects of propellers on the stability, control and trim of an airplane. Part 2. Gyroscopic effects.
KITPLANES Aug 1994 (v.11#8) pg. 88

Aerodynamic effects of propellers on the stability, control and trim of an airplane. Part 3. Slipstream effects.
KITPLANES Sep 1994 (v.11#9) pg. 52

Aerodynamic effects of propellers on the stability, control and trim of an airplane. Part 4. Torque, P-factor and slipstream swirl.
KITPLANES Oct 1994 (v.11#10) pg. 81
Correction KITPLANES Jan 1995 (v.12#1) pg. 2

Picking a prop. An analysis of both the cost and performance differences between using a Lycoming O-320 equipped with a wood fixed-pitch propeller and using a Lycoming O-360 with a constant speed prop on the same aircraft.
KITPLANES Oct 1996 (v.13#10) pg. 86

Aircraft propellers. Part 1. Calculating propeller thrust.
KITPLANES Dec 1997 (v.14#12) pg. 6

Aircraft propellers. Part 2. Facets of propeller blade design and how they affect the characteristics of the prop.
KITPLANES Jan 1998 (v.15#1) pg. 6

Aircraft propellers. Part 3. Relationship between pitch and efficiency.
KITPLANES Feb 1998 (v.15#2) pg. 6

Propeller placement. A look at both pusher and tractor arrangements.
KITPLANES Oct 1999 (v.16#10) pg. 52

Troubleshooting erratic prop action on aircraft powered by large Continental engines.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1987 (v.9#7) pg. 18

Results of survey on propeller overhauls.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1988 (v.10#7) pg. 12

Propeller overhauls. Step-by-step review of the Hartzell Company's propeller overhaul service. Includes advice on selecting an overhaul shop, proper lubrication of hubs, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1990 (v.12#9) pg. 12

Field repair basics for minor prop damage (nicks, gouges, etc.).
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1990 (v.12#10) pg. 16

Dealing with nicks, dings, dents, and mars on aluminum propellers is a skill every pilot should have.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1992 (v.14#2) pg. 15

Maintenance advice for prop governors.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1992 (v.14#2) pg. 23

Prop sense. A close-up look at prop overhaul procedures, intervals, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1993 (v.15#8) pg. 12

Propeller operating tips which may help extend operating life.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1993 (v.15#8) pg. 16

Tips on locating the source of oil leaks in a Lycoming IO-360-A1B6D installed on a Cessna Cardinal RG.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1994 (v.16#1) pg. 20
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1994 (v.16#3) pg. 4 (Prop governor pad)
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1994 (v.16#5) pg. 5 (Prop governor pad Service Instruction)

How your prop works. An in-depth tour of props and governors. Includes a pre-flight run-up check procedure for constant-speed props.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1994 (v.16#2) pg. 10

Propeller overspeeds (runaways) and what to do about it. Includes a "secret" check procedure for props with unfeathering accumulators. Describes an emergency procedure to reduce the rpm.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1994 (v.16#3) pg. 16
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1994 (v.16#5) pg. 5

Troubleshooting tips for prop governor systems.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1996 (v.18#5) pg. 20

The Continental propeller oil transfer collar. How it operates and advice on maintenance.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1998 (v.20#8) pg. 10

Prop indexing. How to install a fixed-pitch propeller to avoid vibration problems.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1999 (v.21#11) pg. 15

Formula racing propellers. Precautions to take when using metal props in a non-certified installation. Includes design criteria for wood and composite props in racing.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1983 (v.32#2) pg. 58

Computer program calculates the operating performance of a family of propellers applicable to small airplanes. Written in Microsoft BASIC.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1984 (v.33#8) pg. 44

A comparative study between a 72" two blade prop and a 56" three blade prop.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1986 (v.35#7) pg. 31

The fixed pitch propeller dilemma. A few suggestions on selecting the first propeller for your homebuilt aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1986 (v.35#8) pg. 28

Improving performance by modifying propeller tips.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1987 (v.36#4) pg. 40

No moving parts. The circulation control airfoil and the fluidic propeller. Changing the coefficient of lift by blowing small quantities of air out of slots.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1988 (v.37#3) pg. 27

Driving the prop. Advice on slip-in drive bushings, nuts, bolts and hubs used to attach and drive a propeller.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1988 (v.37#4) pg. 37

Building four-bladed wooden propellers. How to laminate a prop blank using fir, birch, Honduras mahogany or maple.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1988 (v.37#6) pg. 56

Applying a urethane leading edge to a wood propeller.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1990 (v.39#11) pg. 67

A wood propeller for your homebuilt. Advantages of a fixed pitch wood propeller over a modified metal prop. Tips for selecting the right prop, what to expect of your prop, certified -vs- custom built, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1991 (v.40#1) pg. 71
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Mar 1991 (v.40#3) pg. 80

Carving wooden propellers. Use a beam to support the laminated blank and a series of templates which guide a circular saw blade driven by an air motor or die grinder.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1991 (v.40#6) pg. 77

Jig for adjusting the blade angle of a ground-adjustable propeller is also suitable for setting up just about any other wing or fuselage alignment parameters. It combines a machinist's protractor with two bubble tubes from an inexpensive level.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1992 (v.41#9) pg. 83

Advice on the proper installation of a wooden propeller to avoid bolt failure and charring of the mounting face.
SPORT AVIATION May 1993 (v.42#5) pg. 94

Tips on selecting and installing a propeller on an experimental aircraft.
SPORT AVIATION May 1994 (v.43#5) pg. 104

How to choose a safe propeller. Looks at the many factors which must be considered (performance, weight, cost, noise, diameter limits, etc.).
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1994 (v.43#7) pg. 41

Propeller efficiency. A rough guide to calculating the prop thrust from a particular combination of engine and prop.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1994 (v.43#9) pg. 98
Correction SPORT AVIATION Dec 1994 (v.43#12) pg. 100

Jig for balancing a wooden propeller after refinishing is made from skateboard wheels, threaded rod, nuts and washers.
SPORT AVIATION Oct 1996 (v.45#10) pg. 122

4200 RPM props. Results of research into using small-diameter props at higher rpm so they can be directly driven by an automobile engine.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1997 (v.46#3) pg. 94
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Jun 1997 (v.46#6) pg. 105
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Sep 1997 (v.46#9) pg. 4

Stories and advice on hand-propping an airplane. Part 1.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Mar 1990 (v.18#3) pg. 28

Stories and advice on hand-propping an airplane. Part 2.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Apr 1990 (v.18#4) pg. 14

Sensenich propeller model numbers and their meanings. A reprint from a 1955 spec sheet.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Aug 1990 (v.18#8) pg. 29

Step-by-step hand propping techniques explained.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Dec 1990 (v.18#12) pg. 33

Propcraft. An introduction to the craft of fabricating wooden aircraft propellers.
WOODWORKER #1116 Nov 1986 (v.90#11) pg. 942

AVIATION RADIO entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AVIATION RADIO
sa   AVIATION RADIO ANTENNA
sa   EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER
x   AIRCRAFT RADIO
x   AVIONICS
xx   AIRCRAFT
xx   RADIO

Omni aviation navigation system. Simulate aircraft instrument navigation using simple trigonometry and this BASIC program.
BYTE Jun 1982 (v.7#6) pg. 468

Convert the AM-914/TRC naval receiver to tune the 225-400 MHz military areonautical band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1980 (v.36#10) pg. 74

Government surplus RC-3A fixed frequency VHF receiver operates on 127.4 MHz. Tips on opening and modifying the receiver to locate downed aircraft or listen to aircraft tower conversations. Est. cost: $15.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 56

Tip on installing diodes to protect aircraft radios from electrical damage while starting the engine.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Fall 1993 pg. 12

Aviation-band receiver. This superheterodyne unit, built around four IC's, is designed to receive AM signals in the 118-135 MHz frequency range. Est. cost: $25.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Spring 1994 pg. 80

Receiver for monitoring aircraft/tower radio transmissions. Est. cost: $10.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1965 (v.8#4) pg. 96

Jet eavesdropper, a receiver to tune in the aircraft bands (108 to 136 megacycles). Uses two vacuum tubes.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1967 (v.10#2) pg. 111

Three-tube receiver tunes from 215 to 280 mc, the frequency of military aircraft.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1968 (v.11#1) pg. 41

One-transistor converter tunes aircraft frequencies (108-136 mc). Est. cost: $4.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1970 (v.13#5) pg. 25

Airport Buddy. A simple receiver that is tuned to pick up frequencies used by aircraft (108- to 135-MHz).
ELECTRONICS NOW Jan 1999 (v.70#1) pg. 25
Added Info ELECTRONICS NOW Mar 1999 (v.70#3) pg. 30

Convert the Eicocraft FM radio kit to receive aircraft radio signals.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1970 (v.10#1) pg. 75

A paper-thin VHF receiver can be carried in your pocket or strapped to your arm. Powered by a 9-volt battery, you can take it aboard an aircraft and listen to the pilots and controllers.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1971 (v.11#3) pg. 65

Convert your AM/FM pocket radio into an aircraft scanner.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1980 (v.20#5) pg. 47

All about antennas. Special considerations for homebuilders when the time comes to outfit amateur-built aircraft with the "spines" of communication.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1984 (v.11#3) pg. 18

Erector-set radio. Tips on constructing aircraft radios from a kit. The kits are available from Radio Systems Technology Inc.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1984 (v.11#4) pg. 24

Build your own navcom. tips on constructing a kit from Radio Systems Technology Inc. (Grass Valley, CA).
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Nov 1984 (v.11#11) pg. 22

Know your navcom. Valuable tips on outfitting your homebuilt airplane with avionics.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Sep 1986 (v.13#9) pg. 52

Proper antenna design and installation for a composite aircraft. Part 1.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1987 (v.14#1) pg. 38

Proper antenna design and installation for a composite aircraft. Part 2.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Feb 1987 (v.14#2) pg. 28

Building a marker beacon receiver using a kit from Radio Systems Technology.
KITPLANES Sep 1992 (v.9#9) pg. 46

Installing the Bendix/King KX 125 navcom. Includes installation tips that apply to avionics in general.
KITPLANES Apr 1993 (v.10#4) pg. 48

Installing Icom's IC-A200 panel-mounted aircraft transceiver.
KITPLANES Sep 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 72

Building the RST (Radio Systems Technology) 447K panel-mounted intercom kit.
KITPLANES Dec 1993 (v.10#12) pg. 98

Perspective on coaxial cable and its use in aircraft radio installations.
KITPLANES Nov 1996 (v.13#11) pg. 46

Using coaxial cable baluns, splitters and filters in aviation radio installations.
KITPLANES Jan 1997 (v.14#1) pg. 87

How to install intermediate connectors on general aviation radios in order to achieve the same level of compatibly found in the airlines' "Arinc" standard.
KITPLANES Oct 1997 (v.14#10) pg. 62

Headphone and microphone connectors for aviation radio. Suggestions on installing smaller, more modern, standardized versions.
KITPLANES Dec 1997 (v.14#12) pg. 18

KARMIC connector standards for aircraft electronics. Part 3. Nav radios, DME, marker beacon, transponder, altitude encoder, etc.
KITPLANES Feb 1998 (v.15#2) pg. 86

How to construct a test box and apparatus to check the accuracy of altitude encoders via the KARMIC connector.
KITPLANES Apr 1998 (v.15#4) pg. 20

How to install an AM/FM music radio in an aircraft using KARMIC connectors.
KITPLANES Jun 1998 (v.15#6) pg. 86

Homebrewing a headphone amplifier to listen to a music radio installed in an aircraft.
KITPLANES Aug 1998 (v.15#8) pg. 32

Advice on selecting and installing lightning detection devices on composite aircraft.
KITPLANES Aug 1998 (v.15#8) pg. 76

Building the world's cheapest voice-activated airplane intercom.
KITPLANES Oct 1998 (v.15#10) pg. 60

A radio for the hangar. How to adapt an old style aircraft radio into a receive-only base station. Part 1.
KITPLANES Apr 1999 (v.16#4) pg. 56

A radio for the hangar. How to adapt an old style aircraft radio into a receive-only base station. Part 2.
KITPLANES May 1999 (v.16#5) pg. 46

Tips on locating an antenna or venturi to produce minimum drag.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1988 (v.10#9) pg. 20

Eliminating the "whine" induced by the left alternator in a Piper Seneca II/III which causes radio interference.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1989 (v.11#4) pg. 4

Troubleshooting a King KR86 ADF that is rendered useless by alternator (electrical) interference.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1990 (v.12#10) pg. 18
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Dec 1990 (v.12#12) pg. 4

Description of the electrical voltage spikes which can damage aircraft radios.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1990 (v.12#11) pg. 5

Troubleshooting the source of electronic noise in your aviation headphones. What causes various types of noise and where to look for the fault.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1992 (v.14#11) pg. 10

Do-it-yourself panel work. Advice on selecting replacement avionics and performing a supervised installation.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1994 (v.16#9) pg. 5

Proper wiring and wire-bundling procedures behind your instrument panel that you should insist on whenever any avionics work is performed.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1994 (v.16#10) pg. 24

Installing an avionics master switch to protect both your radios and yourself.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1995 (v.17#3) pg. 12

Maintaining communications. Malfunction prevention is the key to increased avionics life, especially for older radios.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jul 1995 (v.17#7) pg. 10

Do-it-yourself avionics. Tips on assembling Radio Systems Technologies audio panel kit.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1995 (v.17#8) pg. 14

Common communication equipment problems and likely causes. Part 1.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Apr 1996 (v.18#4) pg. 4

Common communication equipment problems and likely causes. Part 2.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE May 1996 (v.18#5) pg. 4

Troubleshooting your VOR and ILS system.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1996 (v.18#8) pg. 5

Checking out your ADF (automatic direction finder) system.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1996 (v.18#9) pg. 4

Troubleshooting DME (distance measuring equipment) systems.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1996 (v.18#10) pg. 6

Cockpit chatterboxes. Overview of built-in and portable intercoms. Tips on selection, installation, troubleshooting, etc.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1996 (v.18#11) pg. 5

Transponder tribulations. Squawking problems in the beacon system. System background, some troubleshooting hints, and what to expect from a routine inspection.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1997 (v.19#2) pg. 15

Navcom tender-loving-care. Common sense and routine maintenance ideas for aviation radios.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Dec 1999 (v.21#12) pg. 16

How to get started in monitoring commercial aviation radio.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #536 Jan 1973 (v.69) pg. 92

Experimenter's aviation band receiver tunes the 118-to-135.95-MHz AM band. Est. cost: $9.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1986 (v.3#9) pg. 44
Added Info MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1987 (v.4#2) pg. 92

Monitoring airport control towers. A review of the frequencies used in aviation communications.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 12

Those strange signals above the FM band. DX'ing the VHF signals in the 108 to 118 MHz which are assigned to the FAA's Very high frequency Omni Range (VOR) and Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) network.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Aug 1990 (v.8#12) pg. 29

Understanding and scanning aircraft shortwave radio.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Aug 1995 (v.13#12) pg. 42

How to become an FAA electronics technician. Tips on getting started toward this career.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1975 (v.7#4) pg. 48

Build a legal in-flight airline receiver that allows you to listen in on airplane-to-control tower conversions.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1977 (v.11#5) pg. 61

Build an aviation-band receiver designed to tune the 118-MHz to 135-MHz band. Est. cost: $25 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1993 (v.10#1) pg. 31

Simple regenerative receiver circuit for the high aircraft band (225- to 400-MHz).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1995 (v.12#9) pg. 31

Monitoring military aircraft. Use an ordinary scanner and these listening tips to follow the exciting transmissions of military pilots.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1997 (v.14#1) pg. 45

A $25 receiver to monitor aircraft frequencies.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1964 (v.122#3) pg. 190

Converter allows you to tune in aircraft frequencies on AM radio.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1968 (v.130#2) pg. 166

A guide to tuning in the air-communications band on a multiband radio. Includes a chart of air-to-ground communications-frequency allocations by specific city or airport.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1979 (v.151#3) pg. 82

All about instrument landing systems.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1984 (v.55#3) pg. 49
Correction RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jun 1984 (v.55#6) pg. 22

Circuit to generate an audio signal consisting of 30 Hz and 9960 Hz at 0.5-VRMS. Used to check aircraft VOR navigation systems.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1990 (v.61#8) pg. 12
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1990 (v.61#11) pg. 25

Stratospheric super sleuth. A battery-powered VHF receiver tunes two bands, 106 to 128 MHz and 126 to 150 MHz. Listen to aircraft and satellite communications. Est. cost: $25.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Aug-Sep 1967 (v.23#1) pg. 25

VHF converter to hear aircraft communications in the 118-128 MHz range. Est. cost: $7.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1968-Jan 1969 (v.25#3) pg. 71

Receiver tunable over the 117- to 150-MHz aircraft band and also the 2-meter amateur band. Operates from 117-volt AC or 9-volt DC current. Uses 1 transistor plus an amplifier module.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Feb-Mar 1970 (v.28#1) pg. 39

More information on fabricating and installing interior wing tip antennas.
SPORT AVIATION Jul 1985 (v.34#7) pg. 40

Checklist of weight and representative costs for aircraft electrical and avionics systems. Covers basic electrical system, VFR radios, VFR cross country add-ons, and night flying add-ons.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1988 (v.37#12) pg. 59

Automatic avionics bus switch with safety bypass makes it impossible to leave the avionics master in the "on" position after shutting the airplane down.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1992 (v.41#9) pg. 84
Added Info SPORT AVIATION Dec 1992 (v.41#12) pg. 90

Simple electronic circuit will feed the signal from an aircraft warning buzzer into the intercom system so that it is easier to hear.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1993 (v.42#9) pg. 89

Supplemental volume control for aircraft headsets.
SPORT AVIATION May 1994 (v.43#5) pg. 102

Battery alternatives for handheld aircraft radios. Tip on selecting a long-life battery, building a constant-current charger for Ni-cad cells, charging techniques, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1995 (v.44#3) pg. 30

Troubleshooting noise problems associated with a radio installed in an engine-driven aircraft. Determining the cause of the noise, installing noise filters, squelch control, etc.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1995 (v.44#4) pg. 73

Stalking the elusive EMI (electromagnetic interference) in aircraft radio and navigation equipment.
SPORT AVIATION Apr 1996 (v.45#4) pg. 86

AIRCRAFT SEAT entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT SEAT
xx   AIRCRAFT
xx   AIRCRAFT COCKPIT & INTERIOR

Adjustable seat design for the BD-4 is made from 4130 tubing.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Jan 1995 pg. 6

Cracks and tracks. Here's what you need to know about seat rail replacement in older Cessna aircraft.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1995 (v.17#6) pg. 11

SunMate cushions. Tips on selecting and installing composite foam seat cushions from Dynamic Systems, Inc. which "provide high energy impact absorption and ... uniform orthopedic support".
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1999 (v.21#9) pg. 20

Making custom-shaped seats for a homebuilt airplane from carved foam.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1990 (v.39#8) pg. 28

Aircraft seat design and padding to maximize impact safety.
SPORT AVIATION Jan 1991 (v.40#1) pg. 68

AIRCRAFT STORAGE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AIRCRAFT STORAGE
sa   AIRCRAFT HANGAR & TIE DOWN
xx   AIRCRAFT

Hand grip (handle) is welded onto the vertical stabilizer spar to facilitate moving of a biplane.
E.A.A. TECHNICAL COUNSELOR NEWS Apr-May 1989 pg. 6

An inactivity checklist. Maintenance considerations for an airplane that is flown less than once a week. Looks at engines, rubber products, brakes, and electrical system.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Feb 1988 (v.10#2) pg. 15
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1988 (v.10#6) pg. 20

Tips on using OMC's "Storage Fogging Oil" to protect an aircraft engine over the winter.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Oct 1988 (v.10#10) pg. 20

Protecting an inactive airplane. Advice on preserving the engine, pressure carburetors, electrical system, rubber components, and preventing airframe corrosion.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Aug 1990 (v.12#8) pg. 8

Tips on preparing an aircraft engine for long-term storage.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jan 1992 (v.14#1) pg. 20

Tips on preserving an uninstalled aircraft engine (remanufactured or factory new) for several months.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1997 (v.19#3) pg. 21

Preservation and storage. How to protect your engine investment when your airplane is out-of-service for 30 days or more.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Sep 1999 (v.21#9) pg. 10

Short-term storage tips for an aircraft engine (less than 90 days).
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Jan 1991 (v.19#1) pg. 15
Correction VINTAGE AIRPLANE Mar 1991 (v.19#3) pg. 5

Engine storage procedures when an airplane will not be flown for the winter or any other period of time longer than 30 days.
VINTAGE AIRPLANE Dec 1994 (v.22#12) pg. 8, 27

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- LUTON MINOR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- LUTON MINOR
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

Luton lightweights. (1) Three-view drawing and technical data for the Luton Minor single-seat aircraft, circa 1953. (2) Reduced-scale plans for two different free flight classic scale models of the Luton Minor. (3) A related article reviews a scale model kit of the Luton Minor.
AERO MODELLER #772 Feb 2000 (v.65) pg. 8, 10, 32

ALARM & SIREN entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ALARM & SIREN
sa   AUTOMOBILE SECURITY SYSTEM
sa   BOAT SECURITY SYSTEM
sa   ELECTRIC POWER-FAILURE ALARM
sa   FIRE ALARM
sa   GAS DETECTOR
sa   INTRUSION ALARM
sa   LIQUID ACTIVATED ALARM
sa   SECURITY SYSTEM
sa   SWIMMING POOL ALARM
sa   TEMPERATURE ACTIVATED ALARM
sa   TOUCH ALARM
x   SIREN
xx   SECURITY SYSTEM
xx   SOUND EFFECTS

Low-cost alarm system you can build to sound a horn or turn on a light.
BOYS' LIFE Apr 1976 (v.66#4) pg. 68

Circuits for sensors in computer-controlled alarm systems.
BYTE Feb 1981 (v.6#2) pg. 280

Experimenting with a piezoelectric speaker includes a circuit for a portable siren.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Dec 1983 (v.21#12) pg. 89

Circuit for an electronic "fire engine" alarm. Est. cost: under $10.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1979 (v.35#1) pg. 99

Refrigerator tone alarm beeps whenever the door is left open for more than 20 seconds. Triggered by refrigerator light.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1981 (v.37#11) pg. 85

How to control the Heath/Zenith Barking Dog Alarm via an X-10 universal module.
ELECTRONIC HOUSE Mar-Apr 1991 (v.6#2) pg. 16

A tape recording of a growling dog is activated by this device whenever someone presses your doorbell.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1969 (v.12#5) pg. 43

Free-running multivibrator turns Sonalert alarm on and off at a rate of 2 beeps per second.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Dec 1969 (v.82#6) pg. 79

Construction details for two electronic sirens, one with self cycling.
ELECTRONICS WORLD May 1970 (v.83#5) pg. 41

Photoelectric alarm monitors ambient light in a photographic darkroom. When light rises to an unsafe level the alarm goes off, sounding a bell or cutting electrical power. Can be modified for other purposes (burglar, fire, freezing, ...).
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1969 (v.8#1) pg. 59

Electronic alarm generator produces a "yelp-yelp-yelp" sound. Sound can be output via headphones or your hi-fi amplifier. Est. cost: $4.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1973 (v.13#4) pg. 77

How to modify the Radio Shack Disaster Alarm kit (#28-4006) to be a smoke, gas, heat, and burglar alarm.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1973 (v.13#5) pg. 40

Alarm circuit for an attache case. Uses a photocell which sets off an alarm if case is opened.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1978 (v.18#5) pg. 69

Li'l Wailer, an electronic siren that can be adjusted from a barely discernible cry to a scream that will attract attention for at least 100-ft around. Powered by a 9-volt battery, it will fit easily into your pocket.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1979 (v.19#5) pg. 57

A look at four types of home detectors: Smoke alarms, gas leak alarms, severe storm alarms and power failure detectors.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #190 May-Jun 1978 (v.28#5) pg. 32

Circuit simulates the warbling "hee-haw" of a British police siren.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Winter 1985 (v.2#3) pg. 72

Yelping siren circuit is similar in concept to the British "hee-haw" police siren.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Spring 1985 (v.2#4) pg. 35

Electronic siren circuit can be incorporated in your home-brew circuits as a warning or signaling device. Simulates the "hee-haw" sound of modern police sirens. Est. cost: $5.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1986 (v.3#1) pg. 67

Wailing siren circuit can be custom tailored to produce the most attention-getting effects. Features the sound associated with fire-emergency vehicles.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1986 (v.3#3) pg. 86

Build a frig-door alarm. Sounds off whenever the freezer or refrigerator door is left ajar. A time delay built into the circuit allows for normal access without tripping the alarm.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jul 1987 (v.4#7) pg. 65

Total security. An overview of today's electronic alarm systems.
HOME MECHANIX #739 Nov 1989 (v.85) pg. 42

Medicine chest alarm.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #512 Jan 1971 (v.67) pg. 106

Circuit for a security wailer. Makes a sound like a fire engine. The rise and fall of the wail pitch, plus the percentage change in pitch, can be adjusted. Est. cost: under $10.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1978 (v.1#1) pg. 48

Circuit for the continental two-tone blee-bloop siren now being used by emergency vehicles.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1978 (v.1#4) pg. 67

Circuit to turn a 12-volt police siren on-and-off at three second intervals.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1978 (v.1#5) pg. 6

A pilot-lamp beeper. Audibly alerts you when an electrical appliance with a pilot lamp is left on. Powered by a 9-volt battery. Requires no connection to the pilot lamp circuit.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] May 1985 (v.1#8) pg. 48

Teleguard. Phone accessory automatically calls a preprogrammed telephone number when your burglar/fire alarm or other sensor is tripped. Part 1.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1985 (v.1#9) pg. 48

Teleguard. Part 2. Conclusion.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1985 (v.2#1) pg. 60

Teleguard. Part 3. Solid-state sensing modules. Low-cost circuits you build to enhance the operation of the Teleguard security system. Includes light-activated sensors, temperature-sensing module, and fluid-detecting module.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1985 (v.2#2) pg. 56

Experimenter's interface device. Part 3. Experimenting with input and output lines on a Commodore-64 computer. Projects include a sequential binary counter, alarm clock, power control, and alarm system.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1985 (v.2#3) pg. 64

Tattle Tale. A unique home or office intruder and emergency monitor that you phone to find out if all is well. Can be used to monitor up to three emergency situations (breakin, fire, flood, heating/cooling failure, etc.).
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1986 (v.3#12) pg. 28

Old-house security: Part 2. Locks and Alarms.
OLD-HOUSE JOURNAL Dec 1986 (v.14#10) pg. 472

"Panic Alarm" makes noise and flashes light.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1964 (v.20#5) pg. 37

Electronic siren circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1965 (v.22#2) pg. 78

Very sensitive electronic relay for use in alarms, controls, etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1965 (v.23#5) pg. 57

Electronic siren circuit contains two multivibrators operating at widely different frequencies.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1966 (v.24#3) pg. 79

Switch which can be activated by light, noise or touch is useful in an alarm circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1966 (v.24#6) pg. 56

High-power transistorized siren. A 12-volt transistor circuit delivers 15 watts output to horn or speaker.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1966 (v.25#3) pg. 55

Two electronic noise makers. A siren and a noise like water dripping.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1968 (v.28#2) pg. 33

"Riot Restrainer". Alarm sounds when noise exceeds a predetermined level, turns off when noise level goes down.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1969 (v.30#4) pg. 47

Basic blocking oscillator circuit can serve as (1) code practice oscillator, (2) continuity tester, (3) metronome, (4) audio test signal source, (5) alarm signal and (6) basic electronic organ.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1970 (v.32#1) pg. 99

Two-tone audible alarm switches from 500- to 1000-Hz five times a second.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1970 (v.32#2) pg. 29
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1970 (v.32#4) pg. 105

Circuit where switching arrangement allows wide-range relaxation oscillator to operate as (1) electronic organ, (2) metronome, (3) thermometer, (4) code practice oscillator, or (5) siren.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1970 (v.32#6) pg. 80

Electronic siren circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1970 (v.33#1) pg. 86

Build a general-purpose alarm with a siren-like wail that can be triggered by a number of sources.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1972 (v.2#3) pg. 64

Applications for the 555 integrated circuit timer chip described in the Nov 1973 issue (p.54). Applications include: (1) Warble alarm circuit, (2) Schmitt trigger or bistable buffer, (3) Square wave oscillator, (4) Output drive considerations, (5) Wide-range pulse generator.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1974 (v.5#1) pg. 72

General-purpose audio oscillator can serve as (1) a code-practice oscillator, (2) self-contained audio source for testing microphones and loudspeaker placement or (3) as a signal in an alarm system.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1974 (v.6#3) pg. 81

Circuit for producing a "whelper" sound.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1974 (v.6#3) pg. 93

Circuit for "wail/whoop" siren generator.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1974 (v.6#4) pg. 90

This alarm circuit feeds signal to a background-music PA system.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1974 (v.6#6) pg. 68

Circuit to add an exit delay when turning on an alarm system and/or to turn off an alarm system after a period of being enabled.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1976 (v.10#2) pg. 24

Electronic Christmas gifts built around the TL489C analog level detector. It can be used to make (1) soil moisture detectors, (2) temperature range indicators, (3) controls and alarms for fish fanciers, chemists, chefs and photographers, (4) battery & continuity testers, (5) toys and games, (6) simple light organs, (7) humidity alarms,...etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1978 (v.14#6) pg. 78

Fridge Alarm sounds an alarm after preset time when refrigerator door is left open. Est. cost: $10.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1979 (v.15#5) pg. 69

Circuit for a general purpose alarm.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1979 (v.16#4) pg. 87

Open-humidor alarm. Circuit sounds an alarm if exposed to light for more than a few seconds. Use to remind someone to replace the top on a humidor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1981 (v.19#3) pg. 92

An appliance "off" reminder. Low-cost project uses a phototransistor to produce an audible alert whenever an appliance indicator light goes off.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1981 (v.19#6) pg. 76

Memory circuit for alarm systems warns you if the alarm has been triggered.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1981 (v.19#6) pg. 93

Event-failure alarm. Circuit for an alarm which sounds a warning a predetermined time after an event has taken place if no corrective action has been taken.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1982 (v.20#4) pg. 107

The 3x3 alarm. The first in a series of projects developed around a 3"x3" printed-circuit board. This battery-powered circuit produces the familiar two-tone, he-haw sound when triggered.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1991 (v.8#2) pg. 67
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1991 (v.8#5) pg. 3

Sonic Defender. Protect yourself with a blast of high-intensity sound (130 dB) from a hand-held, battery-powered unit. Est. cost: $19 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1991 (v.8#5) pg. 25
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1991 (v.8#7) pg. 3
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1991 (v.8#8) pg. 4

Siren or loud wail sounder operates for a long time on battery power.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1991 (v.8#7) pg. 23

Alarm circuits which utilize the 558 oscillator/timer IC. (1) Circuit that waits a long time to respond to a trigger signal. (2) Circuit that generates extremely long output pulses. (3) Non-bypassable alarm circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1992 (v.9#10) pg. 72

Circuit sounds an alarm for 30 seconds if it detects any light for 15 seconds. Can be used to detect an open refrigerator door.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1992 (v.9#11) pg. 76

Circuits based on the LM3909 oscillator/flasher IC. (1) Dual LED driver. (2) Tick circuit flashes an LED and gives out a sharp tick on a speaker. (3) Variable audio-frequency oscillator. (4) Electronic siren. (5) Code-practice oscillator. (6) AC lamp flasher.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1993 (v.10#5) pg. 70

Using a single special-purpose IC (the ULN2429A fluid detector) in as many applications as possible. (1) Low-level liquid level detector. (2) High-level liquid level detector. (3) Touch-activated switch. (4) Proximity sensor. (5) Ultrasonic pest repeller. (6) Variable square-wave generator. (7) Code-practice oscillator. (8) Alarm circuit. (9) Light beam circuit (LED-emitter / phototransistor-sensor circuit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1994 (v.11#6) pg. 76

Alarm circuit with all the standard features (exit/entry delay, automatic reset, status indicators, etc.) uses one simple IC.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1994 (v.11#9) pg. 26

Build a refrigerator-door alarm. Sounds an "obnoxious" tone when either the refrigerator or freezer door is open or ajar.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1996 (v.13#6) pg. 57

Simple op-amp application circuits. (1) Fixed voltage reference. (2) Light-operated sensor. (3) Alarm sensor. (4) Voltage-level sensor. (5) Peak-voltage detector and hold. (6) DC motor driver and reverser. (7) Simple timer circuit to delay relay operation for up to 30 seconds.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1997 (v.14#11) pg. 62

Alarm projects and keypad interfaces. (1) Warning system isolated from main power source. (2) System-tripped indicator. (3) Time-keeping circuit to remind someone to take a medication. (4) Interface for low-cost telephone-like keypad produces a logic output that identifies the key that has been pressed. (5) Standard telephone-type keypad will operate a relay if the correct four-digit code is entered.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1998 (v.15#2) pg. 64
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1998 (v.15#4) pg. 56

Pocket-size alarm siren provides protection for pedestrians walking alone. Battery powered and variable pitched device. Est. cost: $10.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1966 (v.125#1) pg. 198

By plugging an alarm bell into the light socket of an automatic garage door opener, you can trigger the alarm remotely, from your bedside, during the night. A three-way switch allows you to turn the alarm off when you don't want it activated. Useful as a "panic alarm" to summon help or scare off prowlers.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1975 (v.143#5) pg. 210

The Lockbox House. Part 13. Electronic security for the leisure home. Includes a surveillance camera, a remote station intercom and an ionization smoke and fire detector.
POPULAR SCIENCE Oct 1974 (v.205#4) pg. 116

Build this thunderstorm alarm. Alarm sounds when lightning strikes are detected within 10 to 20 miles.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1980 (v.51#3) pg. 56

Trouble tone alert. Audio alarm circuit monitors an analog test meter. Whenever the meter moves up, the alarm sounds. Use it to help trace intermittent problems in electronic circuits.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1980 (v.51#9) pg. 76

Build this super siren alarm with a distinctive sound that will not go unnoticed.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1982 (v.53#4) pg. 44

One-gate siren circuit uses few components, is easy to build and the siren's sound can be customized by varying the values of several of the components.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1985 (v.56#10) pg. 102

Dual-condition sensing. A look at the 3041 Monitor/Alarm IC, a dual-input circuit designed to monitor two different voltages and give an indication if either varies from the preset level by more than a user-settable predetermined percentage. Useful for various alarm systems.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1986 (v.57#10) pg. 89

Two-tone alarm circuit uses a Schmitt trigger.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1989 (v.60#7) pg. 67

CMOS phase-locked loops (PLL's). An in-depth look at a particularly versatile CMOS IC, the 4046B micro-power CMOS phase-locked loop. Includes circuits for sound generator, square-wave generator, tone switch, etc.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1989 (v.60#12) pg. 55

Home-security cookbook. Part 1. An introduction to modern home-security alarm systems. Typical circuits for fire, burglar and panic alarms. Placement of sensors and controls also covered.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1990 (v.61#5) pg. 61

Home-security cookbook. Part 2. Sirens and various types of "fault-indicator" alarms.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1990 (v.61#7) pg. 56

Use perf board construction to build a variable tone siren that will wobble up and down in frequency controlled by a push button.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #789 Jun-Jul 1966 (v.20#3) pg. 73

Portable electronic siren imitates a police siren's rising and falling pitch.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Aug-Sep 1970 (v.28#4) pg. 43

ALCOHOL entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ALCOHOL
sa   ALCOHOL DETECTOR
sa   ALCOHOL FUELED ENGINE
sa   ALCOHOL LAMP
xx   FUEL

Questions to ask before buying an alcohol still.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1980 (v.64#5) pg. 43

Notes from the alcohol underground. Confessions of a first-time alcohol fuel maker. Includes tips for do-it-yourselfers.
HARROWSMITH #35 Apr-May 1981 (v.5#7) pg. 35

How to convert a lawnmower engine to operate on alcohol fuel.
HARROWSMITH #35 Apr-May 1981 (v.5#7) pg. 44

Building an ethanol still. Basic instructions and bill of materials for a good welding project.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION May-Jun 1981 (v.70#5) pg. 30

Tip: Adding boric acid powder to denatured alcohol will produce a pale green flame when burned, instead of a colorless flame. May prevent accidental burns.
JEWELRY MAKING, GEMS & MINERALS #530 Dec 1981 pg. 79

Tip: Make the flame of an alcohol lamp visible by adding boric acid to the alcohol.
LAPIDARY JOURNAL Nov 1986 (v.40#8) pg. 69

How to build an inexpensive backyard solar still to produce ethanol that can be used to fire a converted oil heater. Est. cost: $62.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #56 Mar-Apr 1979 pg. 114

Mother's alcohol fuel "cookbook". The basics of fermentation, mash preparation and how to make a mash barrel from a plastic bucket.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #57 May-Jun 1979 pg. 8

How to build a woodburning still in your back yard.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #58 Jul-Aug 1979 pg. 76

A look at a solar distillation apparatus to produce ethanol.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #58 Jul-Aug 1979 pg. 79

A look at Mother's experimental alcohol-powered truck. Includes detailed sketch of fuel system and steps required to convert a gasburner.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #59 Sep-Oct 1979 pg. 78

How to make a cold-weather starting system for an alcohol-powered pickup truck.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #60 Nov-Dec 1979 pg. 86

Alcohol fuel preheater to build. Warms the liquid alcohol to provide smooth operation in cold weather and to save fuel.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #61 Jan-Feb 1980 pg. 86

A look at the state of the art in alcohol fuel production.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #62 Mar-Apr 1980 pg. 50

Plans for two low-cost backyard alcohol stills. One with a 2" column and one with a 4" column.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #64 Jul-Aug 1980 pg. 120

A look at a Missouri alcohol distillation system that uses the distiller byproducts for livestock feed and earthworm fodder.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #66 Nov-Dec 1980 pg. 132

Design for a home-scale vacuum distillery to make fuel alcohol.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #72 Nov-Dec 1981 pg. 122

Three systems for turning organic waste into resources. A look at composting to produce fertilizer, anaerobic digestion to produce methane gas and hydrolysis of cellulose to produce ethyl alcohol and food yeast. What's involved and the practicability of each system discussed.
ORGANIC GARDENING Sep 1977 (v.24#9) pg. 142

Alcohol fuel. Can you make your own? How an alcohol still works and tips on their design and use.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jan 1981 (v.218#1) pg. 90

ALL TERRAIN VEHICLE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ALL TERRAIN VEHICLE
x   ATV
xx   AUTOMOBILE
xx   RECREATIONAL VEHICLE

Build your own ATV, the MI Marauder, which can be built for about $500.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #500 Jan 1970 (v.66) pg. 76

How to maintain an ATV.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #515 Apr 1971 (v.67) pg. 98

Fun Buggy has two seats. Large-scale plans available from Fawcett for $10. Est. cost (without engine): $500.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #543 Aug 1973 (v.69) pg. 82

"Bush-Buggy", an inexpensive, off-highway, three-wheel vehicle that is amphibious. Powered by a 4 hp. engine. Built from a kit of the mechanical parts and covered with a homebuilt plywood and styrofoam body. A 500 lb. payload. Kit costs: $490.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1966 (v.125#5) pg. 138

PM's High-Tailer. Plans available for a unique off-the-highway vehicle. Using a Corvair truck engine, it has a tubular frame which swivels up to 35 degrees to keep all four wheels driving on steep, hilly terrain. Will carry heavier loads than most 4-wheel drive vehicles.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1967 (v.127#4) pg. 110

Build a "Brush Buggy" for off the road travel. Built from Volkswagen parts. Est. cost: $400
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1968 (v.130#5) pg. 132

A description of winter camping with the Attex compact tent-trailer designed to be hauled behind an all-terrain vehicle.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1973 (v.140#4) pg. 56

Wilderness winching. Tips on selecting and using a winch on off-road vehicles.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1990 (v.167#12) pg. 84

Tread lightly. Advice on responsible off-road travel using 4x4s, motorcycles, mountain bikes, snowmobiles, and ATVs.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1991 (v.168#3) pg. 76, 82, 85, 86, 90

Mini-Scat, an all-terrain vehicle that can be built from a kit.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1970 (v.196#6) pg. 102

Three-wheel, motorized "Mountain Goat" has flotation tires.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS #215 Mar 1963 (v.34#3) pg. 80

ALUMINUM entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ALUMINUM
xx   BUILDING MATERIAL
xx   METAL & METALWORKING

How to prepare and paint aluminum chassis or project boxes so that the paint will adhere permanently.
AUDIO AMATEUR 5/1984 [Oct 1984] (v.15#5) pg. 43
Added Info AUDIO AMATEUR 3/1985 [Jul 1985] (v.16#3) pg. 56

How to tool aluminum cabinet door panels. Includes pattern in Pennsylvania Dutch style.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1972 (v.50#1) pg. 38

How to prepare and paint the natural aluminum frames on storm windows, screens, doors, etc.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #104 Aug-Sep 1996 pg. 22

How to clean aluminum.
HANDY ANDY Jan 1978 (v.2#4) pg. 63

No more rivets. How to prepare aluminum surfaces for the process of chemical bonding.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Jan 1984 (v.11#1) pg. 20

Aluminum welding. Part 1. Workshop tips from a master on fusing lightweight aircraft metals with gas and hydrogen.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Mar 1985 (v.12#3) pg. 46

Aluminum welding. Part 2. Step-by-step introduction to gas welding of aluminum (continued) plus basic tips on repair.
HOMEBUILT AIRCRAFT Apr 1985 (v.12#4) pg. 22

Aluminum products. What is available in sheet, tubing, extrusion, fittings, and fasteners. Includes tips on working and finishing aluminum.
HOMEOWNER Dec 1983 (v.8#7) pg. 63

Anodizing aluminum. A four step process for anodizing aluminum is described.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Jan 1983 (v.72#1) pg. 24

Tips on heat treating aluminum spinners after repairing cracks using welding techniques.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Nov 1988 (v.10#11) pg. 6
Added Info LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Mar 1989 (v.11#3) pg. 5

Tips on "restoring" (cleaning and polishing) aluminum aircraft "skin" after paint is removed.
LIGHT PLANE MAINTENANCE Jun 1989 (v.11#6) pg. 20

Finishing with foil. The art of gilding wooden furniture, picture frames, wooden boxes, etc. can be learned by using inexpensive aluminum foil.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #654 Nov 1982 (v.78) pg. 14

Tip on removing clear coat from aluminum.
MOTORCYCLIST #1120 Aug 1990 pg. 86

How to restore dull, badly oxidized aluminum.
MOTORCYCLIST #1123 Nov 1990 pg. 86

Make cutters and knurls for machining aluminum from steel helical gears.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1972 (v.137#5) pg. 146

Tips on cleaning corrosion from aluminum.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1996 (v.173#7) pg. 86

How to anodize aluminum.
POPULAR SCIENCE Feb 1963 (v.182#2) pg. 144

Welding aluminum at home. Use a propane torch and special rods.
POPULAR SCIENCE Mar 1980 (v.216#3) pg. 124

Experiments which retrace the steps by which aluminum metal was initially purified back in 1886.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Aug 1986 (v.255#2) pg. 116

Craftsman's corner. Simple, readily available liquids suitable for use as coolant-lubricants when drilling, reaming, tapping and honing steel, copper, aluminum and plastic.
SPORT AVIATION Mar 1985 (v.34#3) pg. 37

Sand casting. How to construct and use a backyard charcoal foundry to do green sand casting of aluminum.
SPORT AVIATION Dec 1987 (v.36#12) pg. 40

Polished airplanes and parts that shine. Advice on polishing aluminum spinners, props, and other surfaces to a brilliant shine and keeping them that way.
SPORT AVIATION Aug 1993 (v.42#8) pg. 49

Aluminum forming. An introduction to the use of the English Wheel.
SPORT AVIATION Feb 1996 (v.45#2) pg. 105

An introduction to the family of aircraft aluminum alloys. Part 1. A look at both non-heat treatable alloys and heat treatable alloys.
SPORT AVIATION Sep 1999 (v.48#9) pg. 78

An introduction to the family of aircraft aluminum alloys. Part 2. Annealing.
SPORT AVIATION Nov 1999 (v.48#11) pg. 100
Correction SPORT AVIATION Dec 1999 (v.48#12) pg. 8

Cutting do-it-yourself aluminum with power saws.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1964 (v.20#4) pg. 28

AM RADIO entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AM RADIO
sa   AM RADIO ACCESSORIES
sa   AM RADIO ANTENNA
sa   AM RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   AM RADIO TRANSMITTER
sa   SINGLE-SIDEBAND RADIO
x   AMPLITUDE MODULATION RADIO
xx   RADIO

Tips on digital readouts for AM/FM tuners.
AUDIO AMATEUR 2/1980 [Mar 1980] (v.11#2) pg. 46
Added Info AUDIO AMATEUR 2/1983 [Jun 1983] (v.14#2) pg. 56

High-quality AM from a crystal radio. Design and construction of a mono receiver.
AUDIO AMATEUR 4/1992 [Dec 1992] (v.23#4) pg. 24

A simple, high-quality AM tube receiver.
AUDIOXPRESS Aug 2003 (v.34#8) pg. 6

Improve Dynaco's FM-5 FM tuner and AF-6 AM/FM tuner by adding IC voltage regulators. Also correct the low-frequency drop in the demodulated signal of the early model FM-5.
AUDIOXPRESS Aug 2003 (v.34#8) pg. 28

Build a simple AM radio receiver from magnet wire, a germanium diode, and an old telephone handset. Est. cost: $10.
BOYS' LIFE Aug 2002 (v.92#8) pg. 46

Two transistor, one IC receiver based upon a super-regenerative circuit. Works well with both wideband and narrowband FM as well as AM. Tuning range is from 88 to 210 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1995 (v.51#12) pg. 105, 110

Multi-modulation. Ideas for combining AM and FM modulation into an AM modulated FM carrier that contains both audio channels.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1997 (v.53#7) pg. 44

Broadcast-band RF amplifier circuit improves AM radio reception in low- and mid-priced receivers.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1989 pg. 156

One-tube breadboard radio designed for high-fidelity AM reception.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Spring 1995 pg. 78

A super portable with lots of volume. Est. cost: $30.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1963 (v.6#4) pg. 58

Two-watt mini amplifier for small portables.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1963 (v.6#4) pg. 86

Four-tube receiver built into bookends.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1964 (v.7#4) pg. 38

One-tube receiver uses compactron tube.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1964 (v.7#5) pg. 32

Simple receiver uses Motorola integrated circuit.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1965 (v.8#2) pg. 34

Radio receiver using one field-effect transistor (FET) producing good headphone volume. FET theory explained.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1966 (v.9#5) pg. 49

Three basic radios for beginners. (1) crystal radio, (2)amplified crystal radio, and (3) regenerative radio.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1966 (v.9#6) pg. 94

One-tube all-bander. A low-cost, high-performance receiver for the listener on a budget. Operating frequency is changed by plugging in a different coil for each band 15, 20, 31, 40, 80, and 160 meters plus the broadcast band.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1967 (v.10#1) pg. 65

Broadcast band preamplifier adds 20 to 40 dB to pull in more distant signals.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1969 (v.12#2) pg. 56

One-station receiver built into the wooden enclosure of a 6" speaker. One knob turns set on and controls volume. Tuner is preset to a favorite station.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1970 (v.13#4) pg. 41

Tips on making an operating AM receiver using a Plessey ZN414 IC, a simple power supply and a hand-wound coil.
ELECTRONICS NOW Dec 1995 (v.66#12) pg. 8

Circuit for a regenerative AM receiver (circa 1962) has been upgraded to use parts that are commonly available today (circa 1997).
ELECTRONICS NOW Jul 1997 (v.68#7) pg. 8
Added Info ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1997 (v.68#11) pg. 8
Correction ELECTRONICS NOW Mar 1998 (v.69#3) pg. 6

Percentage modulation nomogram. A simplified method of determining the percentage of amplitude modulation by use of a straightedge.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Jan 1967 (v.77#1) pg. 31

Beginner's special. Four-transistor regenerative receiver and 3-transistor audio amplifier covers entire broadcast band .55 to 1.6 mc. Est. cost: $12.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1966 (v.3#2) pg. 35

A radio in a tin can serves as the base for a table or desk lamp. Radio uses one tube and is housed in a tobacco-size can. A 117-volt light socket and lamp shade complete the lamp. Est. cost: $16.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1967 (v.3#3) pg. 92

Single-tube superhet broadcast receiver.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1970 (v.9#3) pg. 39

Superheterodyne radio circuits. How they work.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1970 (v.10#5) pg. 45

High-voltage, two-transistor broadcast band regenerative radio operates off AC power.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1971 (v.11#2) pg. 29

One diode and capacitor added to any AM detector will nearly double the output. Can also be used on CB, shortwave or crystal sets.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1973 (v.13#3) pg. 69

Build a TRF (tuned radio frequency) radio that uses an integrated circuit. This receiver is highly selective in its ability to separate stations and deliver a full measure of low-distortion sound. Powered by a 1-1/2 volt battery, you can operate the radio 24 hours a day for 90 days.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1973 (v.13#5) pg. 31

AM broadcast band receiver with built-in two-channel crystal controlled VHF receiver. Can be used as a BCB radio, a VHF scanner, or a BC radio with a VHF override.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1973 (v.13#6) pg. 67

This broadcast band receiver uses a soild-state device called a Varactor diode for tuning instead of a larger tuning capacitor.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1974 (v.14#1) pg. 31

Build an antique antenna-less 1-tube regen receiver. A model maker's delight that actually works.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1974 (v.14#3) pg. 81

Beginner's field effect integrated circuit broadcast band AM receiver. Tunes from 550 kHz to 1600 kHz using a modern version of the regenerative receiver. Powered by two #6 dry cells (1 1/2 volts each).
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1975 (v.15#4) pg. 71

The theory and physics of radio waves, carrier waves and AM and FM modulation.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1976 (v.16#1) pg. 65

The theory and physics of radio sidebands.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1976 (v.16#2) pg. 73

Breadboard AM receiver is a one-tube unit based on the depression-days design. Uses a 27 tube, hand-wound coils, homemade capacitors and earphones.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1978 (v.18#1) pg. 44

Signal snare, an easy-to-build one-transistor reflex receiver. Powered by 6-volt lantern battery and requires headphones.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1979 (v.19#3) pg. 46

Solar powered AM radio receiver is encased inside an old vacuum tube. The tube and tuning capacitor are mounted on a decorative wooden base.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1979 (v.19#3) pg. 65

Build this one-tube regenerative receiver, a broadcast band receiver design from the early days of radio.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1980 (v.20#6) pg. 45

Vintage glass. Schematic of the Scott 800-B AM/FM main receiver chassis and power supply
GLASS AUDIO 4/1993 (v.5#4) pg. 48

How to build a 1920's style wireless receiver.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Fall 1984 (v.2#2) pg. 22
Added Info HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Winter 1985 (v.2#3) pg. 21

Add a digital dial. Add an accurate, digital-tuning indicator to an inexpensive or antique radio to read out AM and FM received frequencies.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Summer 1985 (v.2#5) pg. 79

Circuit for a "Super-Simple-Dyne" broadcast receiver incorporates a 4001A CMOS quad 2-input NOR gate IC.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov 1986 (v.3#6) pg. 92

Circuit for a phase-locked loop broadcast receiver.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1986 (v.3#7) pg. 22

AM-3 walkabout radio. "Walkman" style miniature AM radio does not compromise sound quality. Requires only a single 1.5-volt AA cell. Est. cost: $25.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jan 1987 (v.4#1) pg. 73

Circuit for an ultra-simple, broadcast band, super-regenerative receiver that's capable of picking up a number of local stations using nothing more than a two-foot hank of hook-up wire.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Apr 1987 (v.4#4) pg. 89

Grandpa's antique radio. Make and enjoy a reproduction of an early 1920's two-tube regenerative radio which actually performs by using solid-state devices.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Oct 1987 (v.4#10) pg. 30
Correction HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Feb 1988 (v.5#2) pg. 6
Correction HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May 1988 (v.5#5) pg. 6

Old time radio receiver circuit consists of a Hartley Oscillator (built around a type 30 triode), tickler coil, and earphones.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov 1987 (v.4#11) pg. 93

Modulation and demodulation, the process used in virtually every type of communications system for transfering information. Basic concepts of AM and FM modulation. Experiments include building modulator and demodulator circuits.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1987 (v.4#12) pg. 79

Single transistor BC radio circuit is powered by RF power cells.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1988 (v.5#12) pg. 82

Super-sensitive BC receiver can pull in stations using just a 3-ft. antenna. Operates on 1.2 to 1.6 volts.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1988 (v.5#12) pg. 83

One-transistor model uses battery and phone.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #418 Mar 1963 (v.59) pg. 104

One-tube receiver is easy to build.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #439 Dec 1964 (v.60) pg. 92

Microcircuit receiver uses integrated circuits by Motorola.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #441 Feb 1965 (v.61) pg. 114

Mini modules: great fun for hobbyists. A look at an AM radio you can build using mini modules.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #547 Dec 1973 (v.69) pg. 58

A basic three-tube you can build. Uses the tuned frequency circuit. Est. cost: $20.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #552 May 1974 (v.70) pg. 110

Build a hi-fi quality AM radio receiver. Features a quality speaker, integrated circuit electronics and a decorative wooden cabinet. Est. cost: $40.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #581 Oct 1976 (v.72) pg. 84

Easy-to-build CMOS radio receiver. Learn how to handle CMOS integrated circuits while constructing this unit. Powered by a 9-volt battery.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1978 (v.1#7) pg. 40

Why SSB? Understanding the differences and similarities between AM and SSB radios.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1978 (v.1#9) pg. 64

Tuner specs and what they mean. Examining manufacturers' tuners or the tuner sections of receivers.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1986 (v.3#6) pg. 44

Radio-on-a-chip. Build a TRF (tuned radio-frequency) radio with a tiny IC (ZN414) that contains most components needed. Tunes stations from 550 to 1600 kHz on the AM broadcast band.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1986 (v.3#7) pg. 39

Mixing frequencies. Photos help explain complex linear mixing to amateur radio operators and others. Helps explain AM radio and sidebands.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1988 (v.5#3) pg. 30

Forgotten modulation methods. Understanding amplitude modulation (AM), single sideband (SSB), amplitude compandered sideband (ACSB) and Regency modulation.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1994 (v.12#5) pg. 42

Diagrams of two 2-transistor AM receiver circuits.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1964 (v.20#2) pg. 81, 82

Improve the sensitivity of a small receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1964 (v.20#6) pg. 56

Transistorized broad-band receiver circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1964 (v.21#4) pg. 64

Improving audio quality on inexpensive receivers.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1964 (v.21#5) pg. 82

Miniature transistor superheterodyne broadcast-band radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1964 (v.21#6) pg. 49

Mechanical filter sharpens bandwidth for optimum reception of AM, CW, SSB, and CB.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1965 (v.23#2) pg. 53

Two-transistor "all-wave" radio receiver circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1965 (v.23#5) pg. 79

Circuit of a basic one-transistor TRF receiver consisting only of antenna, tuned circuit, headphone and battery. Successive circuits show additions to the basic circuit to improve quality of reception.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1966 (v.24#1) pg. 73

Simple receiver circuit features greater efficiency from full-wave detection of an AM radio frequency wave. Circuit uses antenna, tuned circuit, diodes, capacitor and headphone.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1966 (v.25#5) pg. 83

The FET set. A battery powered BCB regenerative receiver uses a field-effect transistor (FET). Plays for one year on a 6-volt battery. Est. cost: $10-$15.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1967 (v.26#5) pg. 27

Build a stacked-antenna AM radio. Battery powered unit uses two loopstick antennas. Est. cost: $5.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1967 (v.26#5) pg. 40

Convert an inexpensive AM transistor radio into a tuner which you play through your hi-fi amplifier. This will improve the quality of the sound. Est. cost: $ .25
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 43

Beginners FET regen receiver. Regenerative receiver uses a field-effect transistor and tunes in DX as well as local broadcast stations. Uses three changeable coils covering 0.55 to 1.5 MHz, 1.7 to 5.5 MHz, and 5.5 MHz to 18 MHz. Powered by a 9-volt battery. Est. cost: $25-$32.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1967 (v.27#3) pg. 40

Circuit for an AM receiver which uses no power source and one transistor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1968 (v.29#4) pg. 78

High-quality, solid-state broadcast band tuner for hi-fi rigs.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1969 (v.30#1) pg. 43

Regenerative AM broadcast band tuner employs a varicap diode in place of the common ganged capacitor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1969 (v.30#5) pg. 76

Simple broadcast band receiver demonstrates the use of a field-effect transistor (FET) as an RF amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1969 (v.31#6) pg. 57

Three-transistor regenerative receiver circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1970 (v.32#1) pg. 84

Circuit for a broadcast band receiver that has a reflex front end and IC op amp audio amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1977 (v.11#5) pg. 78

The op-amp AM radio receiver. One circuit requires no external power supply and must be used with earphones. The second circuit is powered by a 9-volt battery.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1980 (v.18#6) pg. 89

Build a synchronous detector for AM radio. Improves frequency response and removes distortion.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1982 (v.20#4) pg. 61
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1982 (v.20#7) pg. 6

Miniature BC (AM broadcast band) receiver circuit uses a ferrite loopstick as the antenna which is tuned by a variable capacitor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1989 (v.6#2) pg. 24

Radio receiver is powered by sunlight or a bright lamp. The circuit is built around a ZN414 integrated circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1989 (v.6#2) pg. 26

Cummings Solodyne. Learn all about the one-tube, one-battery circuit, no larger than today's transistor radios, that was made obscure before its time.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1989 (v.6#8) pg. 73

BC "hearing aid" is really a miniature radio that is built to resemble a hearing aid.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 22

RF enhancement circuits designed to breath new life into older shortwave receivers, or to pull in a DX broadcast station from across the country on a generic AM radio. (1) Signal-grabber. (2) Signal booster. (3) Tunable trap. (4) Signal scrubber. (5) VLF converter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1990 (v.7#3) pg. 84

Solid-state version of the popular reflex-radio circuit of the 1920's.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1990 (v.7#5) pg. 85

Regenerative receiver is a solid-state version of the extremely popular tube-type built by so many hobbyists over the years.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1990 (v.7#5) pg. 96

TRF radio circuit uses a single chip which includes three stages of RF amplification and a detector.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1990 (v.7#8) pg. 24

Super-Simple Shortwave Receiver. A single-conversion superheterodyne designed for listening to AM broadcast stations in the range of 4- to 10-MHz (75- to 30-meters). This receiver can tune any 2.5-MHz portion of the 4- to 10-MHz shortwave radio band you select. Est. cost: $30 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 31
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1993 (v.10#11) pg. 3

Easy-to-build AM receiver circuits. (1) Basic circuit. (2) Amplified-output receiver. (3) Very low frequency tuner. (4) IF amplifier. (5) Voltage control (regulator) for a 6-volt source.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 70

Build a one-tube AM receiver for high-fidelity listening. Powered by batteries.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1994 (v.11#10) pg. 62

Build a preselector to improve the reception on the AM broadcast band.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1995 (v.12#4) pg. 56

Build the magic eye tuning indicator for an AM radio, like those found on 1940s radios.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1995 (v.12#12) pg. 67

Secondary uses for Tesla coils. (1) Simple AM radio receiver. (2) Lightning indicator uses an LED bargraph to show signal strength.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1996 (v.13#4) pg. 77
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1996 (v.13#7) pg. 6

Low-distortion, low-level amplitude modulator (AM) circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1998 (v.15#5) pg. 56

An 8-transistor set that can be built in 30 minutes.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1963 (v.119#4) pg. 135

Stereo and AM radio in a suitcase for $48.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1963 (v.119#6) pg. 116

A five-way radio breadboard includes a wireless mike, touch alarm, code transmitter, phono oscillator, and AM receiver.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1965 (v.123#4) pg. 196

A 6-transistor, battery powered receiver has two IF stages and no IF transformers.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1965 (v.124#6) pg. 176

Build a 1-transistor autogen radio which will tune up to nine local stations by flipping a selector switch. Also provides complete manual selection.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1966 (v.126#3) pg. 169

Build an AM/FM frequency display. Part 1. Gives you a digital readout of the frequency on which your receiver is set. It also displays the time of day. Unit is crystal controlled for accuracy. Est. cost: $45.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1978 (v.49#1) pg. 21
Correction RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1978 (v.49#7) pg. 22

Build an AM/FM frequency display. Part 2.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1978 (v.49#4) pg. 46

Broadcast-band RF amplifier circuit can be added to a low- to mid-priced receiver or car radio to improve AM reception.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1987 (v.58#3) pg. 42

All-band VHF receiver. Tune police, fire, aircraft, weather, FM, CB, AM, etc. Est. cost: $24.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #814 Dec 1966-Jan 1967 (v.21#3) pg. 45

BCB 2 for beginners. Full-fledged superhet with only two tubes. Est. cost: $18.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Oct-Nov 1967 (v.23#2) pg. 67

Variometer radio. Modern version of a radio first used in the 1920's.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1967-Jan 1968 (v.23#3) pg. 47

Pocket-size portable radio has unusual sensitivity and selectivity.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1968-Jan 1969 (v.25#3) pg. 73

Increase broadcast band sensitivity with a battery-powered preamp with amplification provided by a field-effect transistor. Will provide a nominal 6- to 12-dB gain (1 to 2 S units). Est. cost: $10.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1969 (v.26#1) pg. 57

Two-tube broadcast band receiver uses a reflex circuit. Constructed on two identical chassis, one containing the power supply which employs a conventional half-wave circuit, using a silicon diode and RC filtering, and the other chassis holding an untuned RF breadboard amplifier.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Jun-Jul 1969 (v.26#3) pg. 37

Build a transistor radio into the base of an old-fashioned horn loudspeaker.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1969-Jan 1970 (v.27#3) pg. 75

Easy-to-build, integrated circuit, low frequency, regen receiver tunes from 80-kHz to 420-kHz. Uses plug-in coils.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Aug-Sep 1970 (v.28#4) pg. 59

BCB project lets you construct a reflex circuit and a universal B-plus power supply.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 61

Multiband VHF receiver will tune from 26 to 185 MHz by plugging in one of five coils. Est. cost: $24.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS May 1968 (v.39#5) pg. 77

Spider web radio receiver you can build. Uses interchangeable spiderweb coils to cover three bands (7 MHz to 14 MHz, 1.7 MHz to 5 MHz, and .55 MHz to 1.6 MHz). Design incorporates a FET regenerative detector circuit and an audio stage which uses a pnp transistor to drive a pair of headphones. Powered by a 6-volt lantern battery.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Fall-Winter 1978 pg. 60

How to make an electrochemical cell. A voltaic pile and two fuel cells (one using hydrogen and one using alcohol). Also, a circuit for a cell-powered radio receiver.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Nov 1967 (v.217#5) pg. 131

AM RADIO ANTENNA entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AM RADIO ANTENNA
xx   AM RADIO
xx   ANTENNA

Low noise, coaxial link antennas for HF receiving.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1987 (v.43#12) pg. 62

Update on the HF WARC bands (12, 17, and 30 meters). Includes antenna dimensions for WARC-band operations and tips on transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1989 (v.45#6) pg. 70

AM/FM/SW active antenna includes a FET amplifier to boost the signal with almost no load felt by the antenna.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1990 pg. 132

Electronic antenna for the broadcast band will pack at least 40 dB more signal into receiver. Consists of an oversize ferrite-rod antenna, a high-gain preamp and a low-impedance emitter-follower output stage. Powered by a 9-volt battery.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1971 (v.14#2) pg. 77

Build the AM Power Loop, a radio antenna booster to receive distant stations.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jun 1994 (v.65#6) pg. 44

Tenna Boost, an inexpensive, easy-to-build indoor antenna/signal booster amplifier.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1970 (v.10#3) pg. 29

Sharp-tuning preamp designed especially for DXing the broadcast band. The booster can function as an electronic antenna with signals received through a loopstick antenna coil or as a preamplifier with a long-wire antenna.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1978 (v.18#3) pg. 59

How to build, repair and attach loop antennas like those used on antique radios built in the 1923-1926 era.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1978 (v.18#4) pg. 55

BCB (broadcast-band) antennas for small lots. Four basic types of folded long-wire antennas viewed. Includes construction details of PVC masts.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Spring 1985 (v.2#4) pg. 79

AM broadcast radio "magnum booster". Build a large, shielded-loop antenna to add extra directional selectivity.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1986 (v.3#5) pg. 90

Active antenna for better DX'ing. Build an active loop antenna to dramatically improve reception on longwave, broadcast and amateur-shortwave bands. Est. cost: $69.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Oct 1987 (v.4#10) pg. 75

BC antenna coupler. Turn an ordinary AM radio into a super signal sniffer.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Oct 1988 (v.5#10) pg. 41

AM broadcast-band loop antenna.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1987 (v.4#9) pg. 56
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1987 (v.4#11) pg. 5

Tips on improving your AM band DX catches. Ride a frequency, international contacts, antenna ideas, etc.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Feb 1989 (v.7#6) pg. 60
Added Info POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 44

Tip: Use a homemade loading coil to improve AM reception on a crystal radio.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 44

How to wire an antenna to an older radio which has leads called: ANT, GRD and DBL.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1975 (v.7#6) pg. 84

A broadcast band loop antenna for DX'ing increases reception range of inexpensive AM radios by inductive linking. Est. cost: $20.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1976 (v.9#3) pg. 51

Low-cost, air-core loop antenna extends AM radio reception. Loop is mounted on the wall of a room.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1978 (v.14#1) pg. 59

AM/FM/SW active antenna. A one-evening project that will pull in shortwave or AM broadcasts like a magnet. Combines an 18" whip antenna with an FET amplifier to boost the signal.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1989 (v.6#7) pg. 73

BCB Booster, a preamplifier circuit that turns almost any basic AM radio into a real signal puller. Used along with a loop antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1989 (v.6#12) pg. 22

AM reception improvements includes (1) two loop antennas, (2) two active antenna circuits, and (3) a coupling antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1998 (v.15#5) pg. 52

Electronic antenna booster will improve the reception of any AM radio. Est. cost: $35.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1982 (v.158#2) pg. 28

Importance of selecting the right antenna for good AM, FM and TV reception.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1984 (v.161#12) pg. 88

RADIO CONVERTER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


RADIO CONVERTER
sa   CB RADIO CONVERTER
sa   FM RADIO CONVERTER
sa   SHORTWAVE RADIO CONVERTER
x   CONVERTER (RADIO)
xx   RADIO

How to use a low-cost, AM, BC-band transistor radio as the foundation for an amateur-band receiver. Various circuits presented to adapt these receivers for CW/SSB reception.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1996 (v.52#4) pg. 74

Tune CW or SSB on any radio with $3 Universal BFO.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1964 (v.7#6) pg. 96

One-transistor shortwave converter turns any broadcast radio into a shortwave receiver tuning from 5 to 15 mc. Powered by 9-volt battery.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1966 (v.9#4) pg. 29

Two-meter converter for use with a broadcast band receiver.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1968 (v.11#2) pg. 87

Receiver to pick up the time standard broadcasts from the National Bureau of Standards (WWV) and Dominion Observatory, Canada (CHV).
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1968 (v.11#6) pg. 45

One-transistor marine band converter for a broadcast radio. Also tunes 80-meter amateur band and WWV (at 5 mc).
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1970 (v.13#2) pg. 64

A one-transistor marine-band converter for a broadcast radio. Also tunes 80-meter amateur band and WWV (at 5mc).
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1970 (v.13#3) pg. 64

One-transistor converter tunes aircraft frequencies (108-136 mc). Est. cost: $4.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1970 (v.13#5) pg. 25

Beat frequency oscillator (BFO) for any radio. Allows transistor radios with shortwave tuning to pick up SSB and code transmissions.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1970 (v.13#5) pg. 67

Add CW and SSB reception to any radio with a 455-kHz IF transformer using this simple BFO circuit.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jan 1998 (v.69#1) pg. 17

One-tube low-frequency converter. Construction of a converter operating from 15 to 2,000 KHz for use with receivers tuned to 10 meters. Covers the range below 150 meters.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Jul 1967 (v.78#1) pg. 28

Convert an old AC-DC table radio into a crystal controlled shortwave receiver for one frquency between 5 and 20 MHz. Est. cost: $5.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Apr 1970 (v.83#4) pg. 64

VHF police frequency converter for AM radio. Est. cost: $20.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1968 (v.6#3) pg. 67

RF band converter tunes from 30-50 MHz.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1969 (v.8#1) pg. 39

Simplicity converter (SimCon) for an auto radio allows you to hear the emergency bands (25- to 55-MHz). Est. cost: $14.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1970 (v.10#1) pg. 57

Tips on assembling the KCS converter kit from Carl Cordover & Co.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1970 (v.10#5) pg. 61

Circuit for a BFO to pick up CW and SSB signals. Does not have to be attached, only placed near, a multiband transistor portable radio.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1971 (v.11#3) pg. 38

Install a small trimmer capacitor on the exterior of an inexpensive "weather monitor" radio and you will be able to tune in fire, police and some FM programs.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1975 (v.15#3) pg. 72

DX-Com. Crystal-controlled converter allows you to tune three shortwave-broadcast bands on your car radio. Est. cost: $15.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jan 1988 (v.5#1) pg. 70

Shortwave converter for AM receiver tunes 9- to 15-MHz band.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #549 Feb 1974 (v.70) pg. 54

Converter to tune in on new 460-mc police frequencies.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1964 (v.20#5) pg. 56

GC-2 Deluxe, a general-coverage converter using two transistors that tunes from 200 KHz to 18 MHz.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1966 (v.25#5) pg. 41

Convert your "All American 5" for 120-meter marine band. Changing the antenna and oscillator coils will give a tuning range of 1.7 to 5.5 MHz for AM receivers. Est. cost: $10.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1967 (v.26#2) pg. 71

Convert just about any AM broadcast band radio into a 75- and 80-meter ham band receiver to pick up CW, SSB, and AM phone signals. No physical connection between converter and the AM radio. Est. cost: $14.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1967 (v.26#3) pg. 55

Get more VHF on AM/FM transistor radios. Adapt a radio to listen to police, fire, taxi, airport and 2-meter ham calls, as well as AM/FM.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 35

AM radio converter to receive the National Bureau of Standards station (WWV) or the Canadian equivalent (CHV), both of which give the exact time every few minutes.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1968 (v.29#1) pg. 41

Shortwave converter for AM broadcast receiver. Tunes 14-31 MHz. Est. cost: $7.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1969 (v.31#2) pg. 75

VHF frequency converter for an auto radio covers 25- to 225-MHz service bands (police, fire, civil defense, etc.) Est. cost: $40.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1971 (v.35#6) pg. 52
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1972 (v.1#2) pg. 89

A simple shortwave converter for a portable transistor radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1972 (v.1#3) pg. 96

A low-cost emergency broadcast system monitor. Add-on circuit monitors the output of a broadcast receiver and sounds an alarm when an EBS warning signal is received. Estimated cost: $25.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1980 (v.18#6) pg. 62

A simple shortwave converter for any AM radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1982 (v.20#1) pg. 65

High-performance shortwave converter for an AM car radio results in a portable SW receiver with good signal selectivity.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 42
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1990 (v.7#1) pg. 4

Conversion puts AM radio on marine band. Est. cost: $5
POPULAR MECHANICS Jul 1964 (v.122#1) pg. 172

Converter allows you to tune in aircraft frequencies on AM radio.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1968 (v.130#2) pg. 166

How to install an FM converter on your AM car radio.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1979 (v.152#5) pg. 48

Convert a pocket transistor radio to receive any one of the 100 FAA weather report stations by simply adding two capacitors across the tuner.
POPULAR SCIENCE Aug 1972 (v.201#2) pg. 108

Circuit for a crystal-controlled converter which will allow you to listen to shortwave broadcasts on an ordinary AM radio.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1982 (v.53#5) pg. 84

Build this low-band converter to tune from 3 to 300 kHz.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1983 (v.54#1) pg. 47

Convert your AM radio to receive C-QUAM stereo broadcasts. Est. cost: $25.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1984 (v.55#1) pg. 41
Correction RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1984 (v.55#3) pg. 10
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1984 (v.55#8) pg. 18

New life for old car radios. How to convert a car radio into a high-quality receiver for your home. Part 2. Build a shortwave converter.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jun 1987 (v.58#6) pg. 50, 75
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1987 (v.58#10) pg. 25

Low-frequency converter is combined with a standard AM radio to hear traffic in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 550 kHz.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1989 (v.60#9) pg. 47, 64

One-band shortwave converter for a car radio. Covers any 1-MHz segment between 5-30 MHz depending on components selected.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1989 (v.60#10) pg. 49, 90

Dipperette-1, a mixer circuit. When used with a grid dip oscillator as the local oscillator, it is a shortwave converter that will tune in a healthy SW signal via any standard AM radio. Est. cost: $4 (less power supply).
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Oct-Nov 1967 (v.23#2) pg. 63

A 6-meter converter for a standard broadcast band receiver. Tunes 50 to 51.8 MHz. Uses one compactron tube.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1967-Jan 1968 (v.23#3) pg. 75

Converter to tune 158.88 MHz on a standard automobile radio.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1968-Jan 1969 (v.25#3) pg. 37

VHF converter to hear aircraft communications in the 118-128 MHz range. Est. cost: $7.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1968-Jan 1969 (v.25#3) pg. 71

VHF converter for an AM radio to pick up police and fire calls. Est. cost: $6.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Oct-Nov 1969 (v.27#2) pg. 41

Two meter ham band converter for BCB receiver.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Apr-May 1970 (v.28#2) pg. 55

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- SPARTAN EXECUTIVE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- SPARTAN EXECUTIVE
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

Opulent Spartan. Three-view drawing, photos and technical data on the Spartan Aircraft "Executive" luxury airplane, circa 1934.
AERO MODELLER #773 Mar 2000 (v.65) pg. 9

AM RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AM RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
xx   AM RADIO
xx   RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR

Servicing digitally tuned AM/FM radio receivers.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1991 pg. 96

Soup-up those "All American 5" radios and create a good table radio.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1966 (v.9#3) pg. 31

Amplitude modulation tester operates directly off transmitter (without opening) and produces an unusual CRT display of the percentage of modulation.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Jan 1968 (v.79#1) pg. 51

How to align any AM radio.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1967 (v.4#2) pg. 79

Basic radio repair at home using simple tools and a knowledge of electronic basics.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1976 (v.16#2) pg. 45

Hand-calculators, powered by batteries, also can be used as a wideband, RF signal source. Use them to check the RF and IF stages of an AM receiver and as a continuity tester for antennas & connecting cables.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1977 (v.17#3) pg. 67

How to align AM, FM, and AM/FM receivers using a minimum of equipment.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1981 (v.21#1) pg. 71

Repairing headphone-style and belt-style "walk-a-long" radios. Some tips.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov 1987 (v.4#11) pg. 73

"Modbox". A modulation analyzer designed for easy addition to any plate-modulated AM transmitter or receiver running up to 200 watts input. Performs three functions: (1) reads average percent of modulation, (2) warns of overmodulation or severe distortion, and (3) lets you check audio applied to final amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1966 (v.25#2) pg. 41

Troubleshooting an older tube-style AM-FM stereo receiver where one channel drops to a low level after unit warms up.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1987 (v.58#2) pg. 12

Servicing the new digitally-tuned AM/FM radio receivers. Part 1.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1989 (v.60#7) pg. 57

Servicing the new digitally-tuned AM/FM radio receivers. Part 2.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1989 (v.60#8) pg. 60

Troubleshooting your home radio without test equipment.
WORKBENCH Jan-Feb 1964 (v.20#1) pg. 52

AM RADIO TRANSMITTER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AM RADIO TRANSMITTER
xx   AM RADIO

Coil, capacitor and battery form a simple radio wave transmitter.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1963 (v.6#3) pg. 35

Build your own legal and license-free broadcast station. Transmitter input is under 100 milliwatts and the antenna length is under 10 ft.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1969 (v.12#4) pg. 25

Simple circuit to generate short-range AM (amplitude modulation) radio waves uses a 4049 hex inverter and a 1-MHz microprocessor crystal. Emits harmonics at all whole-number multiples of 1-MHz up to at least 10 MHz.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jun 1995 (v.66#6) pg. 29

Low-power AM transmitter. Build a device that features a crystal-controlled phase-locked loop for frequency stability and carrier frequency selection (in 1-kilohertz steps between 100 kHz and 2000 kHz). Est. cost: $79 (kit).
ELECTRONICS NOW Jun 1998 (v.69#6) pg. 39
Added Info ELECTRONICS NOW Aug 1998 (v.69#8) pg. 6

Keep in touch with incoming signals on your CB and VHF/UHF rig by rebroadcasting them to small portable radios at strategic locations. Use this low power AM transmitter to broadcast on an unused AM frequency.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1973 (v.13#5) pg. 72

Low-power broadcast-band transmitter circuits. Typical circuits plus a review of the legal requirements for such devices.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1987 (v.4#4) pg. 68

Broadcast the weather. A simple circuit that rebroadcasts U.S. Government weather forecasts (received on vhf FM channels) for reception on an ordinary AM broadcast-band radio.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1988 (v.5#7) pg. 36

How AM radio transmission works and a mini-power AM transmitter you can build and use for experimenting.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1991 (v.8#3) pg. 38

Poor-man's transmitter that demonstrates the basic principles of amplitude modulation.
POPTRONIX HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Winter 1996 pg. 91

Build this license-free AM transmitter that puts out five watts onto a 117-volt electrical system line which it uses as the antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1973 (v.3#6) pg. 34
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1973 (v.4#4) pg. 111

Circuits for a wireless microphone for both AM and FM broadcast band.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1980 (v.18#1) pg. 83

Build a 1930's style single-tube AM radio transmitter. Est. cost: $20 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1991 (v.8#11) pg. 57

Build the poor-man's transmitter, a simple, inexpensive transmitter that demonstrates the basic principles of amplitude modulation.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1995 (v.12#11) pg. 43

Circuit for a wireless-broadcaster amplifier features four vacuum tubes and can be used to broadcast through a standard AM-band radio. It also doubles as a stand-alone preamplifier/amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1998 (v.15#11) pg. 58
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1999 (v.16#3) pg. 54 (Modified circuit)

Wireless AM microphone powered by 9-volt battery.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1981 (v.52#12) pg. 52

Circuit for an AM transmitter that operates on 117-VAC with a range under 1000 ft. and a power input less than 100-milliwatt.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Oct-Nov 1968 (v.25#2) pg. 22

Short-range AM transmitter for practicing Morse code transmitting. Est. cost: $4.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1969 (v.26#1) pg. 46

Short-range AM transmitter does not require a license. Est. cost: $4.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 53

Miniature telemetry transmitter. Circuit for an ultra-small radio transmitter which can send temperature and other signals to a nearby AM radio. Data is transmitted as a string of clicks. The more clicks in a 15-second period, the higher the reading.
SCIENCE PROBE! Jan 1992 (v.2#1) pg. 103

AMATEUR RADIO entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMATEUR RADIO
sa   AMATEUR RADIO ACCESSORIES
sa   AMATEUR RADIO LICENSING & OPERATION
sa   AMATEUR RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER
sa   AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER ACCESSORIES
sa   CODING
sa   MOBILE RADIO
sa   PACKET RADIO
sa   QSL CARD
sa   RADIO DX'ING
sa   RADIOTELETYPE
x   HAM RADIO
x   QRP RADIO
xx   RADIO
xx   SHORTWAVE RADIO

Tips on how to become a ham radio operator.
BOYS' LIFE Sep 1973 (v.63#9) pg. 14

A review of the HEATH and RADIO SHACK novice license study materials.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1979 (v.35#7) pg. 55

List of Q signals for amateur radio use.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1980 (v.36#2) pg. 80

Using the Drake 2B receiver with the Heath HW101 transceiver. Includes helpful modifications to the HW101.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 24

How to improve the automatic gain control (AGC) in the Drake R4C receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 44

Guidelines for conducting amateur radio shows. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 40

Guidelines for conducting amateur radio shows. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1980 (v.36#6) pg. 68

Guidelines for conducting amateur radio shows. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 59

German World War II communications receivers Part 1. A look at surplus radio gear from Germany, how it works, and how it is used today.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1980 (v.36#8) pg. 20

Guidelines for conducting amateur radio shows. Part 4.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1980 (v.36#8) pg. 60

German World War II communications receivers. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1980 (v.36#12) pg. 17

German World War II communications receivers. Part 3. The Kw E, a superheterodyne receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1981 (v.37#5) pg. 20

Operating tips for the novice. Part 1 (of 4 parts).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 58

German World War II communications receivers. Part 4. Concluding part discusses the E 52a Koln receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 74

Operating tips for the novice. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1981 (v.37#9) pg. 92

Operating tips for the novice. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1981 (v.37#10) pg. 62

Operating tips for the novice. Part 4.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1981 (v.37#11) pg. 62

How to meet the new proposed power rules. How to measure power accurately and how to comply easily.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 26

How to modify older receivers and transmitters to operate on new amateur bands (12, 18 and 30 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 31

A listing (glossary) of terms and abbreviations that are unique to amateur radio.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 72

Profile of the US Army Signal Corp Radio Receiving Set AN/GRR-5. This inexpensive unit covers the frequency from 1.5 to 18 MHz. Includes tips on adding a power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1983 (v.39#3) pg. 104

Tips on converting an old Motorola PA-9033A fixed-frequency high-band receiver strip into an a.m./f.m. receiver for 2 meters. Schematic diagram of a.m. detector modification shown.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1983 (v.39#5) pg. 98

Build your own direct-conversion QRP receiver using a novel principle of mixing. Works between 3500 and 3600 kHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 40

Computer program written in Commodore 64 BASIC for determining reflected power in amateur radio applications.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1983 (v.39#9) pg. 54
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1984 (v.40#2) pg. 73
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1984 (v.40#7) pg. 86
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1984 (v.40#10) pg. 78
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 69
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1985 (v.41#7) pg. 8
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 77

History of the novice license. Part 1 (of 3).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1983 (v.39#10) pg. 58

History of the novice license. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 108

History of the novice license. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 92

Computer program in BASIC is used to keep track of the countries contacted by a ham radio operator.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1984 (v.40#5) pg. 46

Phonetic Russian words for English-speaking radio amateurs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1984 (v.40#6) pg. 30

Glossary of terms and abbreviations used in amateur radio. Includes work signs, message handling abbreviations, and the most common Phillips Code abbreviations.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1984 (v.40#6) pg. 84

Basic setup for measuring s.s.b. p.e.p. output.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1985 (v.41#1) pg. 96

Understanding the new Soviet call-sign system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1985 (v.41#5) pg. 28

Novice licensing data. Covers all the material one must know to pass the FCC Novice written examination. Part 1 of 6. Electrical principals.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1985 (v.41#7) pg. 72

Novice licensing data. Part 2. Circuit components and practical circuits.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1985 (v.41#8) pg. 70

Novice licensing data. Part 3. Signals and emissions, and operating procedures.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1985 (v.41#9) pg. 76

Novice licensing data. Part 4. Amateur radio practices.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 64

Novice licensing data. Part 5. Rules and regulations.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 96

Novice licensing data. Part 6. Rules and regulations (continued).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1985 (v.41#12) pg. 76

Novice licensing data. Part 7. Conclusion. Radio-wave propagation. Antennas and feedlines.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1986 (v.42#1) pg. 58

How to get started in amateur radio. Part 1. Licensing and code.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1986 (v.42#9) pg. 60

How to get started in amateur radio. Part 2. Clubs, courses, examinations, callsigns, privileges, equipment and accessories.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1986 (v.42#10) pg. 63

How to get started in amateur radio. Part 3. Conclusion. Operating and QSL cards.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1986 (v.42#11) pg. 97

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 1. Selecting equipments and locating guidance.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1987 (v.43#2) pg. 66

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 2. New versus used equipment. High or low power. Transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1987 (v.43#3) pg. 70

The emergency. Advice for amateur radio operators on how to be most helpful in supplying vital information via radio.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 46

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 3. SWR/Power meters. Dummy load. Receiver sections of transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 70

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 4. Stacking equipment. Consoles. Safety. Electric power. RF ground.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1987 (v.43#5) pg. 83

What do you say after "Hello"? Tips for amateur radio operators on the art of conversation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1987 (v.43#6) pg. 24
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1987 (v.43#10) pg. 8

Six meters. A band of many faces. Tips on how you can easily and quickly join these exciting activities.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1987 (v.43#7) pg. 36

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 6. Baluns. Station accessories. Transmission lines. Code.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1987 (v.43#7) pg. 64

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 7. Headphones and speakers. QSL cards. Logbooks and legal considerations.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1987 (v.43#8) pg. 80

Repeater etiquette. Some tips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1987 (v.43#9) pg. 40

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 8 (conclusion). Interference. Station location. Operating. Continuing education.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1987 (v.43#9) pg. 92

How to buy your first amateur radio rig. Some tips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1987 (v.43#11) pg. 82

Novice enhancement. The new world of 10 meters. Part 1. The features of 10 meters and what the newcomer can expect.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1987 (v.43#12) pg. 44

Novice enhancement. The new world of 10 meters. Part 2. Antennas, propagation, operating, government regulation, logs, and QSLing.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1988 (v.44#1) pg. 28

Novice operating privileges are reviewed completely and simply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1988 (v.44#2) pg. 68

Explanation of emission classifications.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1988 (v.44#3) pg. 62

Equipment and accessories commonly used in amateur radio stations. An introduction for the newcomer. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1988 (v.44#6) pg. 62

Equipment and accessories commonly used in amateur radio stations. An introduction for the newcomer. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1988 (v.44#7) pg. 62

Tips on how a US citizen with a valid amateur radio license can obtain a Mexican call sign.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1988 (v.44#11) pg. 22

Organizing the toy box. Advice for a radio ham on developing a list (inventory) of his hobby assets, their location and value. This information would be useful in case of death, loss, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1989 (v.45#1) pg. 24

The apartment operator. Advice on operating an amateur radio station in an apartment building. Dealing with TVI, RFI, antennas and neighbors.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1989 (v.45#3) pg. 40

Be kind to your voice. A phone contest primer. Tips for "tuning up" the most used piece of equipment in your amateur radio station, your voice.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1989 (v.45#9) pg. 42

How to find the latest FCC (Federal Communications Commission) rule on a particular subject.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 46

More classic rigs described. (1) 1934 "Globe Trotter" receiver. (2) 1928 "Gil Classic" transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1990 (v.46#2) pg. 74
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1990 (v.46#5) pg. 8

Military Affiliate Radio Systems (MARS). A detailed introduction. Part 1. History, frequencies, benefits, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1990 (v.46#5) pg. 60

Military Affiliate Radio System (MARS). Part 2. Eligibility.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1990 (v.46#6) pg. 46

Build a 1940s-style VHF super-regenerative receiver (rush box) from old tubes and parts.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1992 (v.48#7) pg. 58

Classic radio circuit reproductions. (1) QRP Midget tube-type 30 meter transmitter (circa 1967). (2) 1940s-style Low Boy 6L6 transmitter. (3) 1930s-style Hartley transmitter. (4) 1920s-style one-tube oscillodyne receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1992 (v.48#11) pg. 126

Classic radio circuit reproductions. (1) PeeWee AM transmitter. (2) 1940s two-tube Superhet receiver. (3) 1930s-style push-pull two-tube oscillator transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1993 (v.49#1) pg. 78

The basics of simple HF receivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1993 (v.49#7) pg. 76

Homebrew classics from the 1950s. Part 1. Schematic and parts list for restoring or replicating the Knight Kit 740 "Ocean Hopper" receiver (Allied Radio Company).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1994 (v.50#2) pg. 94

Putting together a typical station for VHF+ frequencies (commonly 6 meters or 2 meters). Tips on transceivers, antennas, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1994 (v.50#3) pg. 80

Homebrew classics from the 1950s. Part 2. Schematic and parts list for the two-tube Knight Kit "Li'l Hopper" receiver (Allied Radio).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1994 (v.50#3) pg. 106

Circuit board artwork and component layout for a VHF receiver that covers to 200 MHz and utilizes the GEC Plessy SL6659 surface-mount chip.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1994 (v.50#4) pg. 80

Build your own 20 meter CW receiver. A single-conversion design using the 9 MHz IF with cascading crystal filters. Incorporates a digital counter that displays the exact tuned frequency.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1994 (v.50#11) pg. 11

A low-power (QRP) primer. Part 1. What it's all about.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1995 (v.51#3) pg. 52

Introduction to equipment and accessories that are commonly used in amateur radio stations. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1995 (v.51#3) pg. 130

Introduction to equipment and accessories that are commonly used in amateur radio stations. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1995 (v.51#4) pg. 96

Introduction to equipment and accessories that are commonly used in amateur radio stations. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1995 (v.51#5) pg. 109

Build a DX-grade six meter receiver designed for small-signal low-noise reception. Complete schematics and construction information included.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1995 (v.51#6) pg. 13

A low-power (QRP) primer. Part 2. How to make it work for you.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1995 (v.51#7) pg. 20

Build a battery powered QRP setup consisting of a one-tube regenerative receiver and 500 milliwatt 1S4 transmitter. Covers 80 and 40 meters and shortwave between 3.5 and 9 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1995 (v.51#9) pg. 48

How to build a QRP transceiver for the novice 15 meter band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1995 (v.51#11) pg. 11

Schematic for a 6 meter micro-power FM receiver using the Motorola MC3367 chip.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1996 (v.52#3) pg. 54
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1996 (v.52#6) pg. 51

How to use a low-cost, AM, BC-band transistor radio as the foundation for an amateur-band receiver. Various circuits presented to adapt these receivers for CW/SSB reception.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1996 (v.52#4) pg. 74

Construction of a simple two-tube superhet receiver (circa 1937) with bandspread tuning that covers amateur bands between 160 and 10 meters (excluding the WARC bands).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1997 (v.53#2) pg. 66

Assembly of the Nor-Cal QRP Club Forty-9er (a 40 meter direct conversion transceiver powered by a 9-volt battery). Installation of this QRP receiver inside an "Altoids" mint tin is also described.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1997 (v.53#2) pg. 74

A 1997 rendition of the ever-popular 1967 "Sucrets" box twins. A miniature transmitter (Wee Mitter) and receiver (Wee Ceiver) each of which uses a "Sucrets" throat lozenge box as the chassis.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 40

Toward simpler superhets. How to minimize the parts count and circuit complexity when building a superheterodyne receiver for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1997 (v.53#5) pg. 74

One-tube regenerative receiver circuit (circa 1939) includes coils for 1.75, 3.5, 7, 14, and 28 Mc. bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1997 (v.53#12) pg. 48

Tip on installing in-the-wall wiring during a house remodeling project to service a ham shack.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1998 (v.54#2) pg. 62

The 160 meter band. Why 160 meters is so unpredictable and what's being done to reveal its secrets. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1998 (v.54#3) pg. 9

The 160 meter band. Why 160 meters is so unpredictable and what's being done to reveal its secrets. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1998 (v.54#4) pg. 11

Circuit for a simple HF to VHF AM/FM receiver that incorporates the Signetics/Phillips NE605 low-power mixer/IF amplifier integrated circuit.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1998 (v.54#8) pg. 52

Vintage tubes and classic rigs. Part 1. (1) Starting a mini-collection of classic vacuum tubes. (2) Classic Western Electric WE311B 40 meter transmitter circuit diagram and construction tips. (3) Classic spider-web-coil equipped Reinartz 2 receiver circuit diagram and construction tips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1998 (v.54#10) pg. 40

Practical receiver comparisons. Comparing state-of-the-art HF rigs from a receiver point of view. Part 1.
DX MAGAZINE Aug 1990 (v.2#8) pg. 26

Practical receiver comparisons. Comparing state-of-the-art HF rigs from a receiver point of view. Part 2.
DX MAGAZINE Oct 1990 (v.2#10) pg. 10

Using command series Army and Navy receivers.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1963 (v.6#5) pg. 100

Deluxe your Heath sixer to provide bandspread, headphone jack, etc.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1964 (v.7#1) pg. 73

Two-tube VHF broadspanner radio receiver (26 to 173 mc) for $25.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1965 (v.8#1) pg. 45

Sensitive three-tube all-band receiver covers 550 kc to 36 mc.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1965 (v.8#5) pg. 93

Two-meter receiver uses only two tubes. Speaker and headphone output.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1966 (v.9#5) pg. 69

One-tube all-bander. A low-cost, high-performance receiver for the listener on a budget. Operating frequency is changed by plugging in a different coil for each band 15, 20, 31, 40, 80, and 160 meters plus the broadcast band.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1967 (v.10#1) pg. 65

VHF receiver tunes from 26 to 162 megacycles without changing coils. This 3-tube receiver has a 5-position switch for selecting bands.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1967 (v.10#3) pg. 85

A 60-meter ham station. Part 1. The receiver. Uses two tubes.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1967 (v.10#4) pg. 29

Three transistors for 80 meters. This 80-meter receiver covers entire band from 3.5 to 4 megacycles. Battery powered. Headphone speakers. Useful for listening to code transmission.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1967 (v.10#6) pg. 45

Two-meter converter for use with a broadcast band receiver.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1968 (v.11#2) pg. 87

AM converter to pick up 6- and 10-meter ham bands and CB.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1968 (v.11#4) pg. 64

A one-transistor marine-band converter for a broadcast radio. Also tunes 80-meter amateur band and WWV (at 5mc).
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1970 (v.13#3) pg. 64

Ham-CB converter tunes 80-, 40-, 20-, 15-, and 10-meter bands plus CB.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1970 (v.13#4) pg. 57

High-performance, low-cost converter for the 2-meter band.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1972 (v.15#2) pg. 76

A 40-meter heterodyne receiver in which a balanced mixer-detector provides unususal sensitivity and selectivity.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Jan 1966 (v.75#1) pg. 80

Solid state 6-meter receiver with super-regenerative detector. Est. cost: $18.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1966 (v.2#1) pg. 91

Sample questions typical of FCC exams (commercial or amateur).
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1966 (v.2#3) pg. 96

Single tube 3-band converter unit tunes the 6- and 10-meter ham bands, plus 11-meter CB. Use with standard AM receiver.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1969 (v.9#1) pg. 41

Mini-Max, a novel superregenerative receiver, covering the 80- to 175-MHz band. Will receive television, FM, aircraft and police transmissions with just a 2-ft. whip antenna.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1970 (v.10#2) pg. 51

Amateur radio and shortwave listening enthusiasts can use this modified globe to calculate the actual distance to the source of a radio signal.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1973 (v.13#2) pg. 65

How to get your novice license in only three weeks of studying.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1976 (v.16#1) pg. 69

Computerized SWL radio log. A computer program written in SWTP 6800 BASIC with Percom LFD-400 disk system. Store all of your standard logbook information (date, station, frequency, time, and location) and then retrieve it in any desired order.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1979 (v.19#5) pg. 69

Tips on getting started in QRP (low power) ham radio. Includes tried-and-proven QRP operating tips and awards.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1980 (v.20#1) pg. 43

Using the balanced mixer circuit in receivers, transmitters, frequency converters, and signal-generator projects.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Sep 1987 (v.4#9) pg. 94

Getting your FCC license. Everything you need to pass the FCC examination and get your 2nd Class FCC General Radiotelephone Operator license.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Feb 1988 (v.5#2) pg. 65
Added Info HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Aug 1988 (v.5#8) pg. 4

Reason why your ham radio receiver dial can be all "scrunched up".
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Feb 1988 (v.5#2) pg. 78

The simplest ham receiver. An amateur receiver that your grandfather would have used if he had transistors. Uses handwound coils, 5 semiconductors, two variable capacitors, two crystals and a handfull of other capacitors, resistors and hardware. Tunes the 40- and 80-meter bands.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jun 1988 (v.5#6) pg. 63

VHF repeaters and ham radio. An introduction to the concepts of a typical repeater setup.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1989 (v.6#1) pg. 72

Tips on participating in the Novice Roundup operating contest.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1989 (v.7#5) pg. 40

What is ham radio, anyway? An introduction for people who haven't been exposed to it. Part 1.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 69

What is ham radio, anyway? An introduction for people who haven't been exposed to it. Part 2.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Apr 1989 (v.7#8) pg. 43

Gear and associated costs of several popular amateur radio activities. Looks at HF-CW/SSB (80-10 meters), 2-meter FM (HT and mobile), packet radio (2-meter FM), RTTY/AMTOR/PacTOR, and 6-meter/2-meter VHF SSB/CW.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1994 (v.12#5) pg. 36

Getting started on 6-meters (50-54 MHz) amateur band.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Aug 1994 (v.12#12) pg. 47

2-meter traveling. Tips on using your handheld 2-meter rig on cross-country trips, hiking, biking, etc.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Dec 1995 (v.14#4) pg. 42

Buying your first ham radio rig. Advice on used equipment.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Feb 1996 (v.14#6) pg. 36

Two tube superhet receiver for 80 meters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1964 (v.20#1) pg. 45

A $30 VHF transistorized receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1964 (v.20#3) pg. 52

Bandspreading the ARC-5.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1964 (v.20#6) pg. 66

Modifying a BC-453 long-wave receiver to pick up "Q5-er" signals.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1966 (v.25#1) pg. 87

Convert just about any AM broadcast band radio into a 75- and 80-meter ham band receiver to pick up CW, SSB, and AM phone signals. No physical connection between converter and the AM radio. Est. cost: $14.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1967 (v.26#3) pg. 55

Amateur radio for CB'ers. How to convert a citizens band radio to the 10-meter amateur band as an inexpensive start in amateur radio. Part 1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1967 (v.26#5) pg. 51

Get more VHF on AM/FM transistor radios. Adapt a radio to listen to police, fire, taxi, airport and 2-meter ham calls, as well as AM/FM.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 35

Amateur radio for CB'ers. How to convert a citizens band radio to the 10-meter amateur band as an inexpensive start in amateur radio. Part 2.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 59

Experimenting with the super-regenerative receiver popular during the 1930's.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1968 (v.29#1) pg. 52

Companion tuner for the one-watt 1750-meter license-free transmitter described in the January 1972 issue.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1972 (v.1#2) pg. 68

What do hams do? Getting started in amateur radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1972 (v.1#3) pg. 66

How to become a radio amateur. Tests and basic requirements for obtaining an operator's license with emphasis on the novice class.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1973 (v.4#1) pg. 49

Build a direct-conversion communication receiver with good AM-SSB-CW performance at a fraction of a superhet's cost. Covers 3.5 tp 4.3 MHz. Est. cost: $30.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1974 (v.6#5) pg. 48

How ham radio responds during emergencies.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1976 (v.9#5) pg. 94

Schematic for a Q-multiplier (audio filter) to improve the selectivity of the CW and SSB in the Realistic DX-300 receiver. Other tips on improving this receiver are mentioned.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1980 (v.18#3) pg. 110

Is your hobby hazardous to your health? Tips on reducing your exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted by amateur-radio equipment.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1990 (v.7#2) pg. 94

An easy receiver kit. Tips on building (and modifying) the Ramsey SR-1 battery operated unit that covers a selected 2.5 MHz band in the range between 4 and 10.5 MHz. Schematic included. Est. cost: $40.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1990 (v.7#9) pg. 90

Direct conversion receiver. Part 1. A circuit for one of the simplest forms of radio receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1993 (v.10#3) pg. 78

Direct conversion receiver. Part 2. A DCR based on a passive, double-balanced mixer.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1993 (v.10#4) pg. 80
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 82
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1993 (v.10#11) pg. 80 (MAR-1-based receiver/scanner preamp)

Operating in the low bands. Three techniques for improving reception in the 160-meter band.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1994 (v.11#1) pg. 84

The use of double-balanced frequency mixers in ham radio equipment.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1994 (v.11#10) pg. 87

Introduction to building superhet and direct-conversion ham radio receivers, frequency converters and other circuits using the Signetics NE-602 integrated circuit. Part 1. Chip and power-supply circuits.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1995 (v.12#4) pg. 78

Introduction to building superhet and direct-conversion ham radio receivers, frequency converters and other circuits using the Signetics NE-602 integrated circuit. Part 2. RF-input and RF/IF-output circuits.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 76

Introduction to building superhet and direct-conversion ham radio receivers, frequency converters and other circuits using the Signetics NE-602 integrated circuit. Part 3. Local-oscillator circuits.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1995 (v.12#6) pg. 83

Explanation and importance of selectivity to amateur radio receivers.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1995 (v.12#7) pg. 84

Explanation and importance of dynamic specifications to amateur radio receivers.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1995 (v.12#8) pg. 81

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1995 (v.12#10) pg. 66

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 2. Scrounging parts.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1995 (v.12#11) pg. 70

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 3. Laying out the clear pine chassis or breadboard.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1996 (v.13#1) pg. 59

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 4. Making the coil assembly.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1996 (v.13#2) pg. 63

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 5. Wiring tips and power supply problems.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1996 (v.13#3) pg. 63

Building a 1930's version of a starter ham receiver. Part 6. Testing and troubleshooting.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1996 (v.13#4) pg. 26

All about amateur communication modes with an emphasis on packet radio, HF digital, image communication, satellite and space communications.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1997 (v.14#4) pg. 45

Technique for making accurate zero-beat measurements.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1998 (v.15#10) pg. 53

Getting started in QRP. Part 1. Tips on building and operating the Ramsey HR-30 (30-meters) receiver kit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1998 (v.15#11) pg. 60

All-band VHF receiver. Tune police, fire, aircraft, weather, FM, CB, AM, etc. Est. cost: $24.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #814 Dec 1966-Jan 1967 (v.21#3) pg. 45

Small-size two-meter receiver. Uses a superhet front end for good selectivity and a superregen for excellent sensitivity. Two stages of audio provide for driving a speaker or headset. Uses built-in AC power supply. Est. cost: $30.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Oct-Nov 1967 (v.23#2) pg. 71

A 6-meter converter for a standard broadcast band receiver. Tunes 50 to 51.8 MHz. Uses one compactron tube.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Dec 1967-Jan 1968 (v.23#3) pg. 75

One-tube novice shortwave receiver tunes 600 KHz to 38 MHz in four bands using one triple-triode tube and plug-in coils.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Apr-May 1968 (v.24#2) pg. 79

Receiver tunable over the 117- to 150-MHz aircraft band and also the 2-meter amateur band. Operates from 117-volt AC or 9-volt DC current. Uses 1 transistor plus an amplifier module.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Feb-Mar 1970 (v.28#1) pg. 39

Two meter ham band converter for BCB receiver.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Apr-May 1970 (v.28#2) pg. 55

Easy-to-build, integrated circuit, low frequency, regen receiver tunes from 80-kHz to 420-kHz. Uses plug-in coils.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Aug-Sep 1970 (v.28#4) pg. 59

Novice's multibander tunes 600-kHz to 38-MHz in four bands using one triple-triode and plug-in coils.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 25

Multiband VHF receiver will tune from 26 to 185 MHz by plugging in one of five coils. Est. cost: $24.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS May 1968 (v.39#5) pg. 77

Spider web radio receiver you can build. Uses interchangeable spiderweb coils to cover three bands (7 MHz to 14 MHz, 1.7 MHz to 5 MHz, and .55 MHz to 1.6 MHz). Design incorporates a FET regenerative detector circuit and an audio stage which uses a pnp transistor to drive a pair of headphones. Powered by a 6-volt lantern battery.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Fall-Winter 1978 pg. 60

AMATEUR RADIO ACCESSORIES entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMATEUR RADIO ACCESSORIES
sa   AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER ACCESSORIES
xx   AMATEUR RADIO

Amplifier cooling system uses a muffin fan, cardboard box and a length of clothes dryer vent hose.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 58

Improving the vacuum relay QSK in s.s.b.-VOX operation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1980 (v.36#11) pg. 48

A voltage-regulated, high-current 13.8 volt power supply that allows a 12-volt d.c. 2-meter amateur radio to be operated from 110-volt a.c.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1981 (v.37#2) pg. 11

Voltage regulator circuit to power a Tempo S-1 from an external 13.8 v.d.c. source.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 77

A solid state RIT (receiver incremental tuning) switch is the heart of a quiet c.w. break-in system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1981 (v.37#6) pg. 46

Improved spot capability for the Drake T-4XC and R-4C while using the vacuum relay QSK.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1981 (v.37#9) pg. 78

Add forced air cooling to the Heathkit HP-13 mobile power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1981 (v.37#10) pg. 70

An outboard volume control for your receiver. Designed for use with high-impedance headphones. Est. cost: $5.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1983 (v.39#1) pg. 58

Construction details for an "instant" repeater control which can be carried in your pocket, used with any modern transceiver, and requires no additonal power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1983 (v.39#3) pg. 20

A universal tuning reminder. A simple add-on device for your transceiver that will remind you to retune when you change bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1983 (v.39#3) pg. 46

Build a threshold gate for use between c.w. receiver and speaker. This signal-to-noise ratio enhancer can exceed 40dB.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 54

How to build a general-coverage (1.8 MHz through 30 MHz) receiver preselector.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 56

How to build an emergency alert tone decoder which will sound an alarm should a particular tone be detected for the required length of time.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1983 (v.39#7) pg. 38

Living with the lead-acid battery. How they work and how to use lead-acid (automobile) batteries to power amateur radio equipment.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1983 (v.39#9) pg. 66

How to build an X-Y display for c.w. and single-ended RTTY TU (interface) signals. A three component oscilloscope adapter is all that is required.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 42

An easy to build 2 meter preamp and gated noise source.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1984 (v.40#7) pg. 52

Frequency control readout device allows a blind ham operator to determine the frequency via three mechanical pointers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1984 (v.40#10) pg. 42
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 8

How to build a c.w. filter for the novice operator. Part 1. Est. cost: $15.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.41#2) pg. 70

How to build a c.w. filter for the novice operator. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 72

Contruct a low-noise gallium arsenide field effect transistor (GaAsFET) preamlifier for 420 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1985 (v.41#6) pg. 13

A high-resolution tuner for a VHF/UHF receiver or transmitter uses a simple phase-locked-loop method.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1985 (v.41#6) pg. 26

Build a switched capacitor bandpass CW filter. Includes separate bandpass controls, a frequency control, and an output volume control.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1986 (v.42#1) pg. 44

Convert a 15-minute tape cassette into an endless tape loop. Ideal for recording and transmitting "CQ's".
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1986 (v.42#5) pg. 26

Consolidated control console. Analyze what controls and switches have to be manipulated to operate a ham radio station. Then, find a way to consolidate (combine) the controls into fewer controls for more convenient station operation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1986 (v.42#7) pg. 11

How to build a low-budget wooden operating desk. Top measures 24"x48". Est. cost: $32
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1986 (v.42#7) pg. 32

The handy-pack, a self-charging heavy duty battery pack for your handi-talkie will provide up to 3 days of power for field operations. The project consists of 7 individual 1.2 volt cells and a two-level charging circuit to allow normal charging and continuous trickle charging. The practical aspects of charging nickel-cadmium batteries are discussed.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1987 (v.43#7) pg. 20

Rig rack is built from a 24"x48" piece of plywood to hold a Heathkit 101 rig, but can be adapted for any other model.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1988 (v.44#1) pg. 40

Use a TV demodulator to monitor your amateur band receiver while watching television at another location.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1988 (v.44#7) pg. 56

Control box for HF transceivers features a remote PTT (push-to-talk) switch, extendable microphone, microphone preamp and equalizer, sidetone, and remote headset volume control.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1988 (v.44#9) pg. 36

Convert a rugged plastic carrying case (originally used for a soldering gun) to carry a 2-meter handheld radio and accessories. The case also incorporates a ground plane and telescoping whip antenna to improve transmit range.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1988 (v.44#11) pg. 52

A simple, effective, inexpensive approach to receive and/or transmit audio equalization. Adapting the Radio Shack "Stereo Parametric Equalizer" for amateur radio use.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1988 (v.44#12) pg. 13

Build a portable operating setup for QRPers. Plywood box (17"x9"x9") holds all of your small-size QRP gear for transporting or mobile use.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1988 (v.44#12) pg. 60

The evolution of an HF suitcase station. Some ideas for a portable station built around an IC-735 transceiver and accessories all stored in a strong photographic-equipment case with a volume of less than 1 cubic foot.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1989 (v.45#2) pg. 52

Portable operation via battery power. Using deep-cycle lead-acid batteries to power amateur radio equipment for field use. Includes tips on caring for these batteries.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1989 (v.45#5) pg. 64

How to revamp your operating position. Dimensions for building a table, cabinets and cubicles to house your ham radio equipment.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1990 (v.46#2) pg. 22

A remote base controller for the ICOM 2AT, 3AT, or 4AT. An inexpensive way to incorporate a synthesized remote base in your repeater or base station. Est. cost: $45.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1990 (v.46#9) pg. 52

Backup bonanza. Build a simple switchbox to transfer the antenna, speaker, key and microphone from one transmitter to another by pressing a single button.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1990 (v.46#12) pg. 18

How to build a new operating position. Equip a four-leg table with a two-shelf rack which hold your amateur radio equipment and keeps the cords out of sight. Rack is made from a single sheet of plywood.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1991 (v.47#2) pg. 34

Using photovoltaic panels, batteries and regulators to power amateur radio equipment (transceivers, node controllers, etc.)
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1994 (v.50#3) pg. 54

The Vackar high-stability L-C oscillator. Built as a shielded modular unit for a HF amateur-band receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1994 (v.50#6) pg. 26

HF-band (high-frequency) preamps. Pros and cons about using a preamplifier ahead of the station receiver. Includes a schematic for a practical two-stage, 20-dB low-noise preamp and a circuit for bypassing the preamp when transmitting.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1995 (v.51#2) pg. 46

Some receiver design aids. Methods for employing simple two-section HF bandpass filters at the front end of any homemade receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1995 (v.51#4) pg. 82

Building simple isolation interface devices to connect transceivers to amplifiers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1996 (v.52#5) pg. 30

An easy-to-build, thermochromic RF power indicator. How to convert a "Duracell" throw-away 9-volt battery tester strip into an RF power indicator for handi-talkies.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1996 (v.52#7) pg. 26

Build a 455 kHz tunable BFO (beat-frequency oscillator) for receivers that use Collins-Rockwell mechanical filters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1997 (v.53#1) pg. 74

How to keep an emergency back-up radio station battery charged. Battery is automatically disconnected from power supply unit when not in use and automatically charged when in use.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1997 (v.53#6) pg. 56
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1997 (v.53#9) pg. 8

Tips on providing DC power to portable (roving) ham radio setups. Looks at batteries, generators, automobiles, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1998 (v.54#4) pg. 60

A $10 phone patch.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1964 (v.7#2) pg. 91

S-Niner, a tunable, high-gain RF preamplifier covers ham, shortwave and citizens band. Gives 18-30 dB gain
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1965 (v.8#1) pg. 57

Wooden cabinet (rack) to hold ham gear.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1965 (v.8#2) pg. 58

"Varactor Super Band Spreader" uses solid state diodes that work like and are used as variable capacitors. Tables show how much bandspread can be obtained. Est. cost: $4.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1966 (v.9#4) pg. 73

The FET S-Niner, an RF preselector (preamplifier) tunable from 3.5 to 30 mc in two bands. Improves receiver sensitivity.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1968 (v.11#3) pg. 43

Ham station switch box performs four functions. (1) Connects antenna to either transmitter or receiver while (2) simultaneously controlling the standby functions of the transmitter or receiver. (3) Provides a side-tone when you send CW and (4) feeds low-power signal into the receiver so you can find your signal on the receiver dial.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1971 (v.14#2) pg. 84

High-gain tunable RF preamplifier covers the international shortwave and ham bands between 5 and 30 mc. Provides over 40 dB overall gain. Est. cost: $16.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1972 (v.15#3) pg. 40

Simple phone patch for ham radio operators.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1972 (v.15#6) pg. 59

Autopatch selector for radio amateurs. Remotely-controlled device is used to activate up to 16 different devices upon receipt of the proper DTMF (dual-tone multifrequency) codes sent by a UHF transceiver. Primary use is to select from more than one UHF transceiver when interfacing to a telephone line.
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1993 (v.64#11) pg. 64

A battery-powered regenerative preselector using a high-gain field-effect transistor (FET) will boost weak signals about 40 dB before they reach your receiver.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1968 (v.7#1) pg. 41

One diode and capacitor added to any AM detector will nearly double the output. Can also be used on CB, shortwave or crystal sets.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1973 (v.13#3) pg. 69

Novice hams may want to install a CW filter on their receivers to improve selectivity. Some tips.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1978 (v.18#6) pg. 57

HertzMarker will sound off with a sharp tone each time you tune through a preset bandspread on your tuning dial. This simple transmitter, set near your receiver, will generate the tone.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1979 (v.19#6) pg. 73

Get better selectivity with an amateur radio receiver with this active audio filter. This bandpass filter can be adjusted to Q values between 1.4 and 15. Its center frequency can be adjusted from 375 to 1500 Hz.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1980 (v.20#1) pg. 63

"On-the-air" sign lights up whenever you press the push-to-talk button on your amateur transmitter. Does not require a direct connection to the transmitter.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Mar 1987 (v.4#3) pg. 27

Simple circuit will emit an audible beeb every ten minutes. Used by ham radio operators to remind them to identify their station.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1978 (v.1#1) pg. 17
Added Info MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1978 (v.1#4) pg. 14

Build and install a scan delay feature in the ICOM R-7000 multiband communications receiver.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jul 1992 (v.10#11) pg. 29

Bringing a computer into the amateur radio shack. Tips on selection, applications, avoiding RFI, etc.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jun 1994 (v.12#10) pg. 42

A 6-meter preamp for $7.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1964 (v.21#2) pg. 53

Zener receiver muter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1964 (v.21#2) pg. 88

Mechanical filter sharpens bandwidth for optimum reception of AM, CW, SSB, and CB.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1965 (v.23#2) pg. 53

Clatter stopper. A simple detector circuit which prevents momentarily strong RF pulses (clatter) from reaching a speaker. Such clatter usually occurs when a nearby transmitter is keyed.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 57

Single-control preselector improves the sensitivity of a low-cost (under $100) general-coverage receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1968 (v.28#3) pg. 41

Relay turns on a tape recorder motor whenever the signal being monitored is being received.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1968 (v.28#5) pg. 89

Impulse noise suppressor can be added to any SWL, Ham or CB receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1968 (v.29#4) pg. 49

Adding a 10-minute "beeper" to a digital clock reminds ham operators to identify their station.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1974 (v.6#2) pg. 48

Active filter sharpens CW reception. Provides 6-dB selectivity of less than 100 Hz. Uses an op-amp in the circuit. Est. cost: $15.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1975 (v.7#6) pg. 49

Selective call receiver monitor turns on the CB audio only when a special signal is received. Using an agreed-upon channel, the caller and receiver have electronic devices to send and receive the special signal. Est. cost: $50.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1976 (v.10#5) pg. 41

Amateur radio modulation monitor circuit shows when negative-peak modulation hits 50, 80, and 100 percent.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 23

Preamplifier connects between antenna and a two-meter amateur-radio receiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1989 (v.6#11) pg. 25

Passive noise limiter circuit that is inserted between the audio output of a receiver and the earphones. It contains both series (threshold) and shunt noise-limiter configurations.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1991 (v.8#5) pg. 78

Improving reception in crowded VHF/UHF ham radio bands by using a wave trap or a half-wavelength shorted transmission line stub.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1991 (v.8#8) pg. 78

Tunable bandpass filter circuit for use in the 40-meter band.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1993 (v.10#4) pg. 81

Design and build a front end (preamplifier) for your shortwave or VHF/UHF receiver. This circuit utilizes the MAR-x series of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1993 (v.10#6) pg. 53
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1993 (v.10#10) pg. 80
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1994 (v.11#3) pg. 87 (Printed circuit pattern)
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1994 (v.11#9) pg. 86 (Preamp oscillations)

Design and build a ham-band variable frequency oscillator (VFO). Use it to control the frequency of transmitters, as the local oscillator that tunes a radio receiver, or as a signal generator to perform tests and measurements on radio equipment. Part 1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1993 (v.10#7) pg. 79

Design and build a ham-band variable frequency oscillator (VFO). Part 2.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1993 (v.10#8) pg. 78

Explanation and importance of some accessories to amateur radio receivers.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1995 (v.12#9) pg. 80

Filters for QRM radios that can help prevent overload from local AM and FM broadcast stations. Two circuits shown.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1995 (v.12#12) pg. 83

Build a versatile DTMF tone pad accessory for your radio transceiver. Est. cost: $20.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1996 (v.13#6) pg. 54
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1996 (v.13#8) pg. 6

VLF (very-low-frequency) and LF (low frequency) ham-radio bands. (1) Simple VLF/LF-to-HF converter circuit lets you receive these bands on either 3.5 to 4 MHz or 4 to 4.5 MHz. (2) Soup up your receiver with this VLF/LF preamplifier circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1997 (v.14#3) pg. 67

Call-Alert. Eliminate the constant chatter on your favorite CB channel or 2-meter repeater. The audio is blocked until the correct touch-tone sequence is received. Est. cost: $49 (decoder) and $23 (encoder).
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1991 (v.62#10) pg. 60

Rollaway ham shack. A cabinet on casters holds all the ham gear for one amateur.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #772 Feb-Mar 1966 (v.20#1) pg. 67

Use a dual voice coil speaker to receive signals from two different receivers. Levels can be preset so that one signal source is reproduced as a background level and the second signal comes in much louder and overrides the background signal. Either signal circuit can be shut off. Est. cost: $10.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Jun-Jul 1967 (v.22#3) pg. 49

VHF extender connects between antenna and receiver and can be used for any 4-megacycle-wide segment of the spectrum between 30-mc and 170-mc.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 67

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- BRISTOL M1 MONOPLANE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- BRISTOL M1 MONOPLANE
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

Emwanezer. A 24" span free flight fun fighter that is loosely based on the WW1 Bristol M1monoplane. Suitable for .020 glow or 0.5cc diesel engines. Full-size plan included.
AERO MODELLER #773 Mar 2000 (v.65) pg. 21

RADIOTELETYPE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


RADIOTELETYPE
sa   PACKET RADIO
x   RTTY
x   TELETYPE (RADIO)
xx   AMATEUR RADIO
xx   CODING EQUIPMENT
xx   PACKET RADIO
xx   RADIO

How to generate radioteletype audio frequencies from an Atari 800 computer.
BYTE Mar 1983 (v.8#3) pg. 436

Eavesdropping on RTTY (radio-teletype). A simple adapter that changes received RTTY signals into audible Morse code.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1979 (v.35#2) pg. 30

A convenient control switcher for mechanical RTTY devices. Eliminates patch cords.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 42

The RTTY local loop. Basic information describes how a teletype machine is hooked up to receive data.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 28

Suggestions for getting started in RTTY on a small budget.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 56

RTTY artwork. How to prepare a paper tape for transmission which will form a "picture" when received.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1981 (v.37#5) pg. 30

RTTY interfaces. An overview. Looks at current loop, voltage loop, neutral loop, polar loop, RS-232, and TTL.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1981 (v.37#6) pg. 56

Selecting and using a tape recorder for RTTY. Looks at paper tape, open reel magnetic, cassette, and eight-track tape.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 12

A simple audio cassette interface for RTTY.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 46

Special issue on RTTY.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1981 (v.37#11) pg. 9

Description of a Radio Shack TRS-80 computer used in a radioteletype system to receive, store and forward bulletins or messages. Programs written in BASIC.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1981 (v.37#11) pg. 26

How to overcome radio frequency interference in the new solid-state digital RTTY equipment.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1981 (v.37#12) pg. 36

Customizing the Macrotronics C.W./RTTY interface. (1) Add external control of PLL adjustment and c.w. sidetone volume. (2) Provide a 425 Hz shift on RTTY reception.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 48

RTTY demodulators. An explanation of the various types and what to expect from each type.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 20

How to implement RTTY (radioteletype) on the IBM Personal Computer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 26

How to build an X-Y display for c.w. and single-ended RTTY TU (interface) signals. A three component oscilloscope adapter is all that is required.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 42

How to adapt the TU-II c.w./RTTY interface (Nov.1982) to work with the VIC-20 and Commodore 64 computers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 44

How to interface older RTTY terminals which utilize a loop supply to computers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 48

Getting started in computer RTTY/c.w. Practical consideratons when shopping for equipment.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 58

Build an RTTY oscilloscope monitor to facilitate tuning RTTY signals.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 72

Tips on using the old Model 15 Teletype teleprinter in RTTY.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 75

How to tune in RTTY signals.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 78

Understanding modern RTTY codes and modes. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 20

The ABC's of RTTY.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 34

Roll your own RTTY. How to modify the Flesher Corp. DM-170 demodulator board kit and FS-1 AFSK kit for RTTY use. Est. cost: $80.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 40

Tone detector circuit will automatically start and stop teleprinter machines which operate on the VHF band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 50

The TU-II revisited. A simple interface unit to receive c.w., RTTY, and ASCII signals with a microcomputer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 54
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.41#2) pg. 8

The "Switchit". How to use one RTTY terminal with two different rigs. Est. cost: $22.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1984 (v.40#11) pg. 64

Understanding modern RTTY codes and modes. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 28

How to modify the HAL ST-6 for RS-232 input/output. This will allow it to be connected directly to a computer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 44

How to modify the HAL CT2200 for use with RS-232. This will allow direct connection with a computer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 56

Utility program for the Commodore 64 computer will convert program files to sequential files for over-the-air transmission and visa versa.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1985 (v.41#5) pg. 78

Build your own versatile radio teletype (RTTY) converter. Unit is designed for loop keying, RS232, and TTL interfacing.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 22
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1986 (v.42#2) pg. 30

How to operate RTTY. Tips for the newcomer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 36

Assemble a portable RTTY station consisting of a battery powered lap computer, terminal unit, and transceiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 46

An RTTY program for the Commodore C-64 computer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 48
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1986 (v.42#3) pg. 54

Computerized RTTY. A ground-floor primer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 102

Practical considerations for adapting your amateur radio station for RTTY.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1986 (v.42#2) pg. 22

The newcomer's guide to AMTOR (Amateur Teleprinting Over Radio), another digital mode of communicating which uses microprocessors in its scheme of error checking and control. A look at the basics and how to use it.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 51, 36

How to modify the AEA model CP-1 computer interface to run FSK (rather than AFSK) input.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1990 (v.46#7) pg. 22

AMTOR for beginners. An introduction to this "modern RTTY".
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1990 (v.46#11) pg. 52

How to work an RTTY contest.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1994 (v.50#1) pg. 98

Basics of radioteletype and how to adapt it for ham use.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1966 (v.2#3) pg. 37

Program a home computer to receive and print out radioteletype (RTTY) transmissions. Such transmissions could be computer programs. Includes schematic for interfaces and an assembly language program for a SWTP computer.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #37 Jan 1980 pg. 102

Teletypewriter fundamentals for hams, SWL'ers and computer hobbyists.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1977 (v.12#4) pg. 43

Radioteletype reader for shortwave receivers. Part 1. Words and numbers are spelled out as moving characters as the ASCII or baudot code signal is received. Est. cost: $190. Theory and circuit operation.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1979 (v.16#5) pg. 39

Radioteletype reader for shortwave receivers. Part 2. Construction, alignment, and use.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1979 (v.16#6) pg. 75

Build the RADFAX decoder to display shortwave non-voice transmissions on your IBM-compatible personal computer. Receive and decode weather charts, radioteletype, Morse transmissions, etc. Est. cost: $60.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1990 (v.7#11) pg. 29

Speech-scrambling techniques as used in many RTTY transmissions.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1982 (v.53#3) pg. 74

Morse/RTTY detector. Let your computer decypher Morse code and radioteletype signals received via shortwave radio. Est. cost: $270. Part 1.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1990 (v.61#4) pg. 33

Morse/RTTY detector. Part 2.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1990 (v.61#5) pg. 49, 66

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- NEW ZEALAND AEROSPACE INDUSTRIES CT4 AIRTRAINER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- NEW ZEALAND AEROSPACE INDUSTRIES CT4 AIRTRAINER
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

CT4 Airtrainer. A 30" span semi-scale control line basic stunt trainer for 2.5cc diesel engines. Full-size plan included.
AERO MODELLER #773 Mar 2000 (v.65) pg. 26, Insert

MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ALBATROS D5 entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ALBATROS D5
xx   MODEL & MINIATURE AIRCRAFT -- ( SPECIFIC AIRCRAFT)

Indoor scale lozenges. How to get superb scale finishes on WW1 fighter models made from foam. Color templates provided for the Albatros D5/5a and Siemens-Schukert DIII. Use the templates along with a color copier to prepare pre-printed colored tissue for covering the models.
AERO MODELLER #774 Apr 2000 (v.65) pg. 14, 13

AMATEUR RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMATEUR RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
xx   AMATEUR RADIO
xx   RADIO MAINTENANCE & REPAIR

ADDED INFO. for the HW-8 R.I.T. printed circuit board which appeared originally in May 1978, pg 8.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1981 (v.37#1) pg. 48

How to get better audio quality from a 2-meter F.M. rig.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1981 (v.37#4) pg. 40

How to check the modulation on a converted CB rig operating on a.m. by using an oscilloscope.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 93

The restoration of the classic Collins KWM-1 s.s.b. transceiver. Includes ideas that can be applied to many early rigs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 48

Understanding modern amateur gear. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 97

Understanding modern amateur gear. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1985 (v.41#9) pg. 80

Understanding modern amateur gear. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 94

Tips on getting started in ham radio on a low budget by finding and repairing older tube-type equipment.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1987 (v.43#1) pg. 52

The right way to tune up your rig. A nifty way to save your tubes and minimize QRM at the same time.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1987 (v.43#10) pg. 58

Tip on replacing the internal lithium battery used to back up memory in many portable ham radio sets.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Aug 1991 (v.9#12) pg. 36

New capacitors for the ARC-5.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1964 (v.20#2) pg. 62

Troubleshooting intermittent transmit or receive on ham transceivers. The problem is often traced to the transmit relay and a circuit modification is provided.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1991 (v.8#6) pg. 76

Test gear for hams. Here's everything you need to know to RF-check your antenna, receiver, transmitter, and transceiver.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 53

Troubleshooting communications receivers. Part 1. How to use a communications signal generator to troubleshoot 2-way radios. Tips on the bench technique and good diagnostic ability needed to perform this kind of repair.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1979 (v.50#2) pg. 63

Troubleshooting communication receivers. Part 2. RF and IF troubleshooting, RF alignment, and the oscillator stages.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1979 (v.50#4) pg. 66

How to make RF power measurements.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1984 (v.55#4) pg. 106

AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER
sa   AMATEUR RADIO TRANSMITTER ACCESSORIES
xx   AMATEUR RADIO

Build this modified enclosure for the GLB synthesizer. Use it along with a bargain priced crystal controlled 2-meter f.m. transceiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1979 (v.35#2) pg. 34

Instructions for building the Viking-5, a 5 watt solid state transmitter for the 3.5 and 7 MHz bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1979 (v.35#2) pg. 40

How to add the low frequency 160 meter band to the Heath SB-220 linear amplifier.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1979 (v.35#2) pg. 46

Build a 1935-style DX transmitter. Uses two tubes and is crystal controlled. Provides stable operation on 20 meters with a power output of nearly 3 watts. Est. cost: $20.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1979 (v.35#2) pg. 56

How to build a stable, two-band (3.5 & 7 MHz) v.f.o. for the Viking-5 transmitter featured in the Feb 1979 issue.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1979 (v.35#4) pg. 32
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1979 (v.35#8) pg. 18

R.F. output measurement. Part 1. Input vs. Output power. Which is better?
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1979 (v.35#6) pg. 66

R.F. output measurement. Part 2. Building a wattmeter, an R.F. probe, and an in-line SWR/Wattmeter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1979 (v.35#7) pg. 28

CORRECTIONS to the QRP-420XC low power transceiver which appeared in a series of four articles in past CQ magazines (Nov 1977, Dec 1977, May 1978 & Oct 1978).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1979 (v.35#7) pg. 62

An updated "Shoebox" linear amplifier. Part 1. A kilowatt linear amplifier built around five 6KD6 sweep tubes.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1979 (v.35#8) pg. 20

A two-band V.F.O. for 80 and 40 meters is capable of driving the Viking-5 transmitter on both bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1979 (v.35#11) pg. 51

An updated "shoebox" Linear Amplifier. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1980 (v.36#1) pg. 13

A power amplifier for 10 meter F.M.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1980 (v.36#2) pg. 38

How to attach the vacuum relay break-in (QSK) system to the Drake T4XC-R4 combination transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 12

Using the Drake 2B receiver with the Heath HW101 transceiver. Includes helpful modifications to the HW101.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 24

A VXO (variable crystal oscillator) transmitter. Uses a 6L6 tube and crystal to tune the 80 meter Novice band. Capable of delivering 10 to 15 watts.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 12

The Viking 3x5. A solid state 4 watt V.F.O. transceiver for 20 meters. Part 1. QRPp unit fits into a 3"x5"x1" box.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 24

High S.W.R. protection for transceivers and amplifiers. This system allows a transceiver to be used with any antenna (or no antenna) without damage to the radio.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 63

The "Frugal Final". A low-cost multi-band linear amplifier. Uses a 4-400A commercial broadcasting tube which may be available free from your local radio station. Operates on 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 8

Schematic for a tone burst circuit accessory for the Yaesu FT-207R microprocessor based 2 meter handi-talkie. Accompanies an article reviewing the FT-207R.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 64

The Viking 3x5. A solid-state 4 watt V.F.O. transceiver for 20 meters. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1980 (v.36#8) pg. 14

Turn a Collins S-line transmitter into a c.w. transceiver with the addition of a full break-in (QSK) and a modified b.f.o. circuit and trap filter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1980 (v.36#9) pg. 42

Converting the Sears-Roebuck 40 channel S.S.B. Citizens Band rig to 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1980 (v.36#11) pg. 59

The Viking 3x5. A solid-state state 4 watt V.F.O. transceiver for 20 meters. Part 3. Additional information.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1980 (v.36#12) pg. 98
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1981 (v.37#1) pg. 48

Simple inverse switching for the Kenwood TR-7400A two meter transceiver allows you to listen to the input side of the repeater.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1981 (v.37#1) pg. 62

Build a noise operated COR (carrier operated relay) for a repeater.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1981 (v.37#2) pg. 18

Improve the selectivity of your TS-820 transceiver. Requires no holes. Est. cost: $60.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 58
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 104

Build a two-chip c.w. transmitter for 80 or 40 meters capable of delivering between 160 and 200 milliwatts. Uses only two logic chips, three coils, a crystal and a handful of resistors and capacitors.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1981 (v.37#10) pg. 9

How to modify Radio Shacks' Archer Space Patrol walkie-talkie to transmit on six meters. Useful only over a very short range with its 50 milliwatts of power.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1981 (v.37#10) pg. 100

The 30 meter band. How to modify some currently available gear for 30 meters, plus antenna hints for getting the signal out.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 17

Converting the Swan 350C to 30 meters with a quick and simple modification.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 23

How to modify older receivers and transmitters to operate on new amateur bands (12, 18 and 30 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 31

Construct your own 80 meter QRP/QSK c.w. transceiver. Includes complete break-in operation with no relays, a tunable receiver offset, battery low voltage indicator, and a side tone for monitoring.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 13

QRP transmitter is built into a small 4"x6" card file box. Built around one of the popular TTL series IC's and two or three transistors. Tunes from 80 to 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 26

Build a one-tube, 10 watt c.w. transmitter on a 4"x5"x1" chassis, complete with power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 46

Build a pocket-size 30 meter QRP transceiver with internal NiCad battery pack, v.f.o. and speaker.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 76

Replace the hardwired power-up frequency selector of the Heath VF-7401 two meter transceiver with this programmable frequency selector.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1983 (v.39#7) pg. 40

How to add 30 meters to the Yaesu FT-901 transceiver. Est. cost: $20.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 40

More convenient mode switching for the ETO Alpha 78 linear amplifier requires only simple modifications.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1984 (v.40#1) pg. 18
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1984 (v.40#2) pg. 94

Modifications for the Heath HW-100 & HW-101. Includes an RIT control, 25 kHz divider, selectable AGC recovery time, and LED bargraph S-meter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1984 (v.40#3) pg. 22

Simple, easily assembled T-R switch compatible with a low-power c.w. transmitter. Est. cost: $10.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1984 (v.40#3) pg. 57

How to build a portable QRP station. Utilizes a converted Sony ICF-7600 receiver and a nominal 5 watt, v.f.o.-controlled 40 meter transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1984 (v.40#6) pg. 18

A 160 meter conversion for the Heath SB-201 and SB-200 linear amplifier.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1984 (v.40#6) pg. 51

Construct a dual-purpose battery pack for the ICOM IC-2, 3, 4AT series of handheld transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1984 (v.40#7) pg. 33

How to add a c.w. break-in circuit to the Kenwood TR-9000 transceiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 54
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 8

Build a 40 meter tube-type breadboard c.w. transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1985 (v.41#1) pg. 22
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1985 (v.41#6) pg. 8

A bare bones linear amplifier project will deliver 500 watts to an antenna. Uses a 3-500Z vacuum tube. Est. cost: $100.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 13

Using the Heathkit DX-60 transmitter on 30 meters without modification.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 90

How to get quick repeater selection on the Azden PCS-4000 2 meter transceiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1985 (v.41#6) pg. 47

How to build a 2 and 10 meter repeater system on a shoestring budget.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1985 (v.41#6) pg. 48

How to convert a Drake L4B from a pair of 3-500Z's to one 3CX1200A7 tube. Includes instructions for building a high voltage power supply for the new tube.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 33
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1986 (v.42#1) pg. 8

How to build a low-price kilowatt amplifier. Est. cost: $200.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1985 (v.41#12) pg. 13

Build a homebrew linear amplifier using 813 tubes.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1986 (v.42#12) pg. 13

Mini-30. How to convert the "classic" QRP transceiver for operation on 30 meters. This pocket-size transmitter includes its own rechargeable battery.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1987 (v.43#2) pg. 62
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1987 (v.43#5) pg. 114

An economical way to refire the Clipperton L power amplifier. How to substitute inexpensive 811 tubes for very-expensive 572B tubes and still output about 700 watts CW.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1987 (v.43#3) pg. 62

Beef up your Heathkit SB-200/220 linear amplifier power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1987 (v.43#5) pg. 48

An easy-to-build 8877 legal-limit amplifier for six meters. The first of four amplifiers which use a common power supply.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1987 (v.43#6) pg. 28

Factory-recommended field modification for Microwave Modules Ltd. 6-meter linear transverter model MMT50/28S will increase selectivity of older units.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1988 (v.44#5) pg. 64

Schematics for two classic vacuum-tube transmitters for 30 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1988 (v.44#6) pg. 64

Your first homebrew QRP rig. Build the TWOFER, a very low power transmitter that will work on 80, 40, 20, and 15 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1988 (v.44#6) pg. 70

CPR for dead HT batteries. (1) Helpful ideas on how to breathe more life into moribund nickel-cadmium packs. (2) Build a conversion unit that allows a HT to be powered by dry cell battery packs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1988 (v.44#12) pg. 48

Add a variable power control to the Kenwood TS-930S. This modification lets SSB/CW power be continuously variable in the normal fashion, with ALC provided at any preset level of power.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1989 (v.45#1) pg. 58

Build a rechargeable, replacement battery pack for the Santec ST144UP 2-meter handheld transceiver. Est. cost: $17.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1989 (v.45#1) pg. 64

Classic rigs for your classic keys. Schematic diagrams of two 1930s-vintage transmitters which are easy to assemble and produce an impressive low-power signal on today's HF bands. (1) Double M Special. (2) Tri-Setter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1989 (v.45#3) pg. 66

Update on the HF WARC bands (12, 17, and 30 meters). Includes antenna dimensions for WARC-band operations and tips on transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1989 (v.45#6) pg. 70

Superhet 30 meter QRP transceiver project. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 32

A superhet 30 meter QRP transceiver project. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1989 (v.45#12) pg. 32

Superhet 30 meter QRP transceiver project. Part 3. Conclusion.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1990 (v.46#1) pg. 28

More classic rigs described. (1) 1934 "Globe Trotter" receiver. (2) 1928 "Gil Classic" transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1990 (v.46#2) pg. 74
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1990 (v.46#5) pg. 8

Two easy-to-duplicate transmitters right out of the 1940s and early 1950s. (1) John Ruskin Special 6L6 transmitter. (2) Li'l Buddy QRP transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1990 (v.46#3) pg. 76
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1990 (v.46#6) pg. 8

Bigger is better. A dedicated 160 meter KW amplifier. Schematic and mechanical diagrams included.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1990 (v.46#4) pg. 52

The QRP-15 CW transceiver. A 15 meter (21 MHz) version of the 20 meter QRP transceiver which appeared in Ham Radio (Jan. 1989).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1990 (v.46#9) pg. 43

An improved crystal-stabilized version of the classic Crystal Hartley transmitter. Runs 2 watts on 30 or 40 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1991 (v.47#9) pg. 102

The Transformerless Wonder. A 3 watt 30-meter transmitter that uses a floating ground and must be constructed on a wooden chassis.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1991 (v.47#9) pg. 105

Semiconductor Space Scanner. Construct a replica of one of the first home brewed solid-state transmitters (circa 1950s) which ran 90 milliwatts on 15 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1991 (v.47#9) pg. 106

The QRP-20 Plus 20 meter CW transceiver. How to build and enjoy using an expanded version of a popular kit.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1991 (v.47#11) pg. 20
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1992 (v.48#1) pg. 8
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1992 (v.48#4) pg. 120

QRP fun. Part 1. Miniature QRP keys with built-in transmitters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1992 (v.48#2) pg. 96

QRP fun. Part 2. Two ultra-low-cost and easy-to-build transmitter projects.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1992 (v.48#3) pg. 106

Overview on 2 meter duplexers and repeaters and how they work.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1992 (v.48#7) pg. 48

Modifications for Heathkit power amplifiers. (1) Meter protection. (2) Flashover tube protector. (3) Saturated transistor antenna switch.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1992 (v.48#9) pg. 46

Classic radio circuit reproductions. (1) QRP Midget tube-type 30 meter transmitter (circa 1967). (2) 1940s-style Low Boy 6L6 transmitter. (3) 1930s-style Hartley transmitter. (4) 1920s-style one-tube oscillodyne receiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1992 (v.48#11) pg. 126

Classic radio circuit reproductions. (1) PeeWee AM transmitter. (2) 1940s two-tube Superhet receiver. (3) 1930s-style push-pull two-tube oscillator transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1993 (v.49#1) pg. 78

QRP transmitter projects. (1) Oner is built on 1" square PC board and outputs 1 watt. (2) Sweet Nuttin' 30 meter pocket-size transceiver.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1993 (v.49#2) pg. 92

The 40 meter fun machine. How to build a 2 watt, 40 meter CW QRP transceiver in six steps. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1993 (v.49#7) pg. 34
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1993 (v.49#12) pg. 50

The 40 meter fun machine. Part 2. The transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1993 (v.49#8) pg. 38
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1993 (v.49#12) pg. 50

The 40 meter fun machine. Part 3. The VFO and push-push doubler circuit.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1993 (v.49#9) pg. 50
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1993 (v.49#12) pg. 50

The 40 meter fun machine. Part 4. Product detector, audio preamplifier, and RC active filter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1993 (v.49#10) pg. 46

The 40 meter fun machine. Part 6. The AGC circuit and SWR bridge.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1993 (v.49#12) pg. 44

Homebrew classics from the 1950s. Part 1. Schematic for a crystal-controlled 6L6 tube-type transmitter which features wide range pi-net output, and runs 3 to 6 watts output.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1994 (v.50#2) pg. 97

Homebrew classics from the 1950s. Part 2. Schematic for the famous 6AG7 transmitter (80 meters or 40 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1994 (v.50#3) pg. 111

Constructing the classic 1960s "Bare Essentials" transmitter from "Electronics Illustrated" magazine. Uses a 50C5 miniature tube, transformerless voltage-doubler power supply, and basic crystal-oscillator arrangement. Output power is between 5 and 8 watts.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1994 (v.50#10) pg. 116

Getting started with QRP (low-power) amateur radio. Schematics for building a simple 1/4-watt CW transmitter, boosting the power to 1 watt, adding a keying switch, shifting the frequency, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1994 (v.50#12) pg. 94
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1997 (v.53#8) pg. 44

Schematic for a simple 1932-style phone transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1994 (v.50#12) pg. 104

Schematic for an ultra-simple QRP transmitter is based on the HA7210 self-contained crystal oscillator IC.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1995 (v.51#3) pg. 104

Internationally famous two-chip 250 milliwatt QRP transmitter uses four 1.25 volt mini cells for power.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1995 (v.51#8) pg. 71

Build a battery powered QRP setup consisting of a one-tube regenerative receiver and 500 milliwatt 1S4 transmitter. Covers 80 and 40 meters and shortwave between 3.5 and 9 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1995 (v.51#9) pg. 48

How to build a QRP transceiver for the novice 15 meter band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1995 (v.51#11) pg. 11

Schematic for a "one chip" micro-power 6 meter FM transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1995 (v.51#12) pg. 58

Schematic for a 1933-style phone transmitter for 10 meters that is thoroughly modern.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1995 (v.51#12) pg. 108

A typical QRP CW transmitter circuit and design philosophy. Useful information when developing circuits of your own or troubleshooting existing QRP transmitters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1996 (v.52#3) pg. 80

Micronaut, an ultra-low-power transmitter for "sport QRP". Homebrewed batteries which power the Micronaut utilize ordinary hardware and "Tabasco" sauce. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1996 (v.52#4) pg. 48

Micronaut. Part 2. Building from scratch vs. kit building.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1996 (v.52#5) pg. 68
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1997 (v.53#3) pg. 74
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1997 (v.53#8) pg. 59

Build your own 30 meter QRP transceiver. It is a single-down-conversion superhet with two IF crystal filers and a 400 Hz audio filter for selectivity.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1996 (v.52#6) pg. 11

Build a 40 meter QRP Titan 5-watt CW transmitter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1996 (v.52#7) pg. 66

An ultra-simple QRP transmitter for 80 meters utilizes the Analog Devices' AD811AN op-amp.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1996 (v.52#8) pg. 60

"Big Daddy" Hartley. Constructing a replica of a 1929 "big bottle" vacuum tube radio transmitter for use on today's bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1996 (v.52#11) pg. 72

A 1997 rendition of the ever-popular 1967 "Sucrets" box twins. A miniature transmitter (Wee Mitter) and receiver (Wee Ceiver) each of which uses a "Sucrets" throat lozenge box as the chassis.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 40

Circuit for a simple 1938-style 50 watt transmitter with vacuum-tube keyer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 54

The QRP 30 Plus. A compact 30 meter transceiver project for the more experienced builder. Features a selectable RF output of either 4 or 8 watts and uses a sensitive superhet receiver with a sharply peaked audio output at about 750 Hz. Could be used for other bands by modifying the tuned circuit.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1998 (v.54#1) pg. 9

A QRP high-power AM transmitter circuit for 75 meters that uses one of four alternative power amplifier tubes.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1998 (v.54#2) pg. 22

Circuit diagram for the miniature Tixie QRP transceiver. Includes tips on constructing the Tixie kit from Embedded Research and modifying the circuit for other bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1998 (v.54#8) pg. 64
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1998 (v.54#9) pg. 51

Homebrewing surface-mount style. Assembly tips for three QRP kit projects that utilize SMT devices. Kits include an ultra-small Pixie transceiver, a universal DC-to-DC converter, and a deluxe-featured electronic keyer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1998 (v.54#9) pg. 46

Vintage tubes and classic rigs. Part 1. (1) Starting a mini-collection of classic vacuum tubes. (2) Classic Western Electric WE311B 40 meter transmitter circuit diagram and construction tips. (3) Classic spider-web-coil equipped Reinartz 2 receiver circuit diagram and construction tips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1998 (v.54#10) pg. 40

Vintage tubes and classic rigs. Part 2. (1) 35T triode vacuum tube transmitter circuit diagram and construction tips. (2) Twin 75TL tube RF amplifier circuit diagram and construction tips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1998 (v.54#11) pg. 48

Modifying the Kenwood TS-940 transceiver for improved split mode operation.
DX MAGAZINE Jan 1990 (v.2#1) pg. 22

Simple modification of the Yaesu FT-101 and other rigs can eliminate transmitting on the wrong VFO in a split operation.
DX MAGAZINE Apr 1991 (v.3#4) pg. 36

Gaseous-state transmitter uses a 6L6/GC vacuum tube, wooden chassis, and a power transformer from an old TV set to put a 25-watt CW signal on the 40-meter band.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1989 pg. 128

Three-unit, 2-band ham station for $50.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1963 (v.6#5) pg. 57

Auto switching from transmit to receive and back again.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1963 (v.6#6) pg. 33

Compressor-limiter for CB and ham keeps modulation level the same.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1964 (v.7#3) pg. 47

Crystal-controlled 80 and 40 meter CW transmitter with input power up to 10 watts.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1964 (v.7#5) pg. 51

Ham/CB in-line modulation monitor.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1964 (v.7#6) pg. 81

Two transistor, battery-operated CW rig has 1/2 watt input power.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1965 (v.8#5) pg. 83

Portable 40 watt, 80 meter transceiver fits into attache case and weighs 10 lbs.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1965 (v.8#6) pg. 53

"Mini-Mitter". A 28.5 oz. transmitter that can put a clean 15-watt (input power) signal on the 40-meter band. Uses two tubes.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1966 (v.9#2) pg. 27

"The Flexible Flea". A flea-power transmitter (100 milliwatts to 5 watts) which works on 20-, 40-, and 80-meters. Uses one tube.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1966 (v.9#3) pg. 69

A 40-watt channelized ham transmitter. Designed for instant frequency changes with the ease and convenience of CB channel switching. Features an 11-position switch.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1966 (v.9#4) pg. 65

A one-tube transmitter for the 40-meter band. Has 15-watt input and 6-watt output. Est. cost: $15.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1967 (v.10#2) pg. 100

A 160-meter ham station. Part 2. The transmitter, 100 watts input on AM phone or CW.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1967 (v.10#5) pg. 67

Three-transistor transmitter for 80-meter band with 2.5 watts input. Fits in a small carrying case along with a transistor radio which is used as the receiver. Battery powered.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1968 (v.11#1) pg. 57

A 40- and 80-meter CW transmitter contains only the bare essentials and costs only $7 to build.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1968 (v.11#2) pg. 29

Junior ham transmitter is a modulated CW rig which operates in the 27-mc license-free band. Input limited to 100 mw.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1968 (v.11#3) pg. 86

Wireless CW monitor is triggered by the transmitter's RF output of 30 watts or more. Est. cost: $10.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1968 (v.11#4) pg. 93

A 20-watt transmitter that operates on 40- or 80-meters by changing coils. Est. cost: $20.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1968 (v.11#5) pg. 42

Robot operator transmits audio material recorded on a 2- or 4-track tape recorder over ham radio.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1969 (v.12#3) pg. 42

Crystal-controlled solid-state ham transmitter for 40- and 80- meters uses two transistors for 18 watts of input power.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1971 (v.14#1) pg. 25

Filter eliminates spurious harmonic radiation from any low-power transmitter (under 100 watts input).
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1971 (v.14#3) pg. 60

Flea power ham transmitter puts out 1 watt with a 12-volt power source.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1972 (v.15#5) pg. 32

A 40-meter ham transmitter with continuously variable power inputs from 1/4 to 20 watts.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1970 (v.10#5) pg. 75

Gaseous-state transmitter. Inexpensive 25-watt transmitter for the 40-meter ham band uses a 6L6/GC vacuum tube, a wooden chassis, and a power transformer from an old TV set.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov 1987 (v.4#11) pg. 63

Those indestructible novice transmitters. A review of 1950's crystal-controlled novice transmitters for morse code. Tips on locating and using these old tube-style transmitters.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1988 (v.5#12) pg. 43

Myths and misinterpretations surrounding the use of high-power linear amplifiers for boosting a signal.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jan 1989 (v.6#1) pg. 92

Build a license-free transmitter for 1,700 meters.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1987 (v.4#9) pg. 78

Vacuum-tube transmitter will send code transmissions in the 40-meter amateur band. A low-power (QRP) one-tube unit based around a type-3A5 twin-triode vacuum tube. Powered by a 3-volt and a 135-volt battery. Est. cost: $100 (kit).
POPTRONIX HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Winter 1996 pg. 19

Choosing your first ham station rig. Includes a list of equipment readily available on the used market.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1990 (v.8#5) pg. 55

Convert CB walkie-talkies to 6, 10 or 15 meter operation.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1964 (v.20#4) pg. 61

Short-range CW transistorized transmitter doubles as a CPO.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1964 (v.20#5) pg. 89

Transistorized transmitter tune-up meter circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1964 (v.21#2) pg. 77

Companion 6-meter phone transmitter has only two tubes.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1964 (v.21#3) pg. 53

Paragon 144. A 2-meter phone transmitter rated at 20 watts input on AM phone.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1965 (v.22#4) pg. 55
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1965 (v.22#6) pg. 12

Single transistor flea-power "Milliwatter" transmits readable CW signals over a distance of 3 miles without a battery by using a steam-driven generator.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1965 (v.23#1) pg. 55

Camper's special, a battery operated 80-meter CW transmitter for use in the field or as a standby. Est. cost: under $10.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1965 (v.23#2) pg. 48

Converting a 6-meter transmitter to FM by means of this FM modulator will eliminate television interference.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1967 (v.26#2) pg. 73

The incredible VFO. A stable, passive, variable-frequency oscillator (VFO) eliminates the need for crystals on some transmitters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1967 (v.26#4) pg. 69

Amateur radio for CB'ers. How to convert a citizens band radio to the 10-meter amateur band as an inexpensive start in amateur radio. Part 1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1967 (v.26#5) pg. 51

Amateur radio for CB'ers. How to convert a citizens band radio to the 10-meter amateur band as an inexpensive start in amateur radio. Part 2.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1967 (v.26#6) pg. 59

Build the QRP midget. A two-tube battery-powered transmitter that will fit in the palm of your hand. Works on 80-, 40-, or 20-meter CW with 2.5 watts input. Est. cost: $10.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1967 (v.27#1) pg. 51

Hart-65 transmitter. Novice CW transmitter with an input of 65 watts for the 80- and 40-meter bands. Use only one tube. Designed for minimum television interference. Est. cost: $20.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1967 (v.27#4) pg. 41

Modulation monitor for ham and CB AM phone transmissions.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1968 (v.28#3) pg. 35

Convert a low-cost, low-power AM multiband amateur transmitter, like the Globe Scout 680, to a modern 6-meter rig.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1968 (v.28#6) pg. 33

Low-cost, low-power 40-meter transmitter delivers up to 10 watts. Est. cost: $25.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1969 (v.30#3) pg. 48

Battery-operated 40-meter transmitter uses a FET crystal-oscillator and ferrite toroid core coil.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1971 (v.34#2) pg. 39

One-watt transmitter for the 1750 meter (160-190 kHz )band requires no operator's license.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1972 (v.1#1) pg. 58

How to calculate actual effective radiated transmitter power and some ways to improve on it.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1973 (v.3#5) pg. 34

Getting the most from your transmitter. Some helpful hints for the ham or CB'er.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1973 (v.4#2) pg. 94

Resurrecting an old amateur radio transmitter. What to look for when purchasing and restoring old ham equipment.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1989 (v.6#5) pg. 96

Economy Six. Build a 6-watt Morse-code transmitter for the 40-meter band. Est. cost: $20.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1992 (v.9#8) pg. 45

The use of double-balanced frequency mixers in ham radio equipment.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1994 (v.11#10) pg. 87

Build a vacuum-tube transmitter for the 40-meter amateur band. This low-power (QRP) code sender operates on batteries. Est. cost: $100 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1996 (v.13#2) pg. 31

Getting started in QRP. Part 2. Tips on building and operating the Ramsey QRP-30 (30-meters) transmitter kit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1998 (v.15#12) pg. 55

A 6-meter, solid-state, 1/4 watt walkie-talkie transmitter. Est. cost: $35.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #780 Apr-May 1966 (v.20#2) pg. 29

An ideal first transmitter for the novice ham. Has one tube and 3-band switching. Can be used to tune the 20-meter band when general-class license is secured. Est. cost: $30. (less crystals).
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER #806 Oct-Nov 1966 (v.21#2) pg. 39

Tips on eliminating "chirp", the carrier shifting in frequency each time the transmitter is keyed.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Apr-May 1967 (v.22#2) pg. 69

Two circuits for flea-power transmitters. One operates on a 3.5- to 3.8-MHz CW band and the second is equipped for both phone and CW on the 15-meter band.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1968 (v.24#1) pg. 50

Four-band QRP low-power transmitter has less than 10 watts input using a 6-volt DC power source. Output is either on the 15-, 20-, 40-, or 80-meter amateur CW bands. Entire unit fits in a 4"x4"x6" case.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1968 (v.24#1) pg. 51

Modifications for the Heathkit HW-16 novice CW transceiver.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Aug-Sep 1970 (v.28#4) pg. 65

A 4-band CW transistorized transmitter covers 15-, 20-, 40-, and 80-meter amateur bands. Flea-powered rig (less than 10 watts input). Uses a six or nine volt power source.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 35

Battery-powered code monitor allows sender to hear the code being transmitted.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS May 1968 (v.39#5) pg. 88

AMMETER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMMETER
x   MILLIAMMETER
xx   ELECTRONIC TESTING
xx   METER (ELECTRONIC)
xx   VOLTMETER & MULTIMETER

How voltmeters, ammeters and other meters work.
ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF ENERGY #44 Jul-Aug 1980 pg. 36

Linear AC measurements using a "diode". Using a synchronous rectifier circuit to measure AC voltage and current with DC meters.
AUDIOXPRESS Jun 2001 (v.32#6) pg. 66

Meter shunts and how to make them.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1991 (v.47#2) pg. 32

Build a "snap on" RF current probe (meter) to check the operation of radial antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1996 (v.52#8) pg. 22

Convert milliammeter to measure voltage or higher currents.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1964 (v.7#2) pg. 89

Build a novel LCD ammeter (100 to 400 milliamperes) and RF power meter (an indicating 50-ohm RF dummy-load wattmeter) incorporating the "Duracell" battery testing strips (a thin-film resistor combined with a liquid-crystal bargraph display).
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1993 (v.64#11) pg. 57

Method for determining the correct resistance for a meter shunt.
ELECTRONICS NOW May 1995 (v.66#5) pg. 9
Added Info ELECTRONICS NOW Sep 1995 (v.66#9) pg. 12

Using the 7107 integrated circuit chip. It is a combination analog-to-digital converter, reference voltage, timing clock, and decoder/driver circuit for 7-segment LED displays. Circuits shown for a digital voltmeter, DC current meter, resistance meter, capacitance meter, frequency meter, etc.
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1996 (v.67#11) pg. 55
Correction ELECTRONICS NOW Feb 1997 (v.68#2) pg. 12

Make your own shunts for measuring current using a multimeter.
ELECTRONICS NOW Aug 1998 (v.69#8) pg. 51
Correction ELECTRONICS NOW Oct 1998 (v.69#10) pg. 12

Explanation and use of meters. Volt, Ohm, Milliammeters, Meggars, and Galvanometers.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1966 (v.2#2) pg. 21

Multi-range milliammeter is provided with an easy access fuse so that it can be easily changed to one specifically rated for the circuit under test.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1970 (v.9#3) pg. 69

Basic course in electricity and electronics. How to measure electricity. Different types of meters and how to use them to measure voltage and current.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1975 (v.15#4) pg. 79

Build a large-scale operating moving coil meter to learn how they work.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1976 (v.16#5) pg. 82

Convert a DC milliammeter to read higher values of current by adding a shunt.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1979 (v.19#1) pg. 40

Solar-cell tester. Measures both the voltage and amperage output under a variable load.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Spring 1985 (v.2#4) pg. 40

Meter demonstrator for classroom use can illustrate the function of a voltmeter or an ammeter.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION May-Jun 1978 (v.67#5) pg. 52

Tips on calibrating ammeters, ohmmeters, wattmeters, etc.
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION Nov 1979 (v.68#8) pg. 48

100,000-megohm-input meter indicates static electricity. Ultrasensitive electrometer-type voltage/current meter (picoammeter) expands your measurement world to one-trillionth of an ampere and a trillion ohms. Est. cost: $38.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1988 (v.5#6) pg. 24

High-current shunt for DMMs (digital multimeters) extends current-measuring capability beyond the usual 10 amperes.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1988 (v.5#8) pg. 48

Variable shunt increases the range of a milliammeter up to five times.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1968 (v.28#1) pg. 64

Modify a milliammeter to be a microammeter with this circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1968 (v.28#6) pg. 60

AC ammeter measures up to five amperes. Est. cost: $3.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1969 (v.30#5) pg. 50

Surplus D'Arsonval movement meters are easily converted to special-purpose voltmeters and ammeters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1974 (v.5#4) pg. 41

Printed circuit board tester which uses an op amp can determine the presence of current flow in a printed circuit board without breaking the foil trace. It gives an estimate of the amount of current.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1977 (v.11#2) pg. 47

How to modify a basic 1-mA movement to measure currents from milliamperes to hundreds of amperes.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1977 (v.11#6) pg. 67

Precision references for current and voltage are used to check the accuracy of test instruments.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1979 (v.16#5) pg. 87

Low-cost op-amp system can measure weak direct currents such as solar-cell output. Measures from 0 to 50 microamps. Estimated cost: $15.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1980 (v.17#1) pg. 59

Measuring large currents with a DMM. Use a high-current shunt to measure tens or hundreds of amperes. How to make the shunt.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1980 (v.18#3) pg. 90

Current-detection circuits. (1) High-gain current sensor can be used to detect the presence of low-level current circulating through a printed-circuit board's copper traces. (2) Inductive current sensor is designed to seek out AC current flow in electrical wiring and electronic circuitry.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1989 (v.6#11) pg. 84

Meter-range extender circuits that increase the sensitivity of an analog current meter. (1) Amplified DC microammeter. (2) Low-voltage voltmeter. (3) Meter-calibration circuit. (4) Low-range ohmmeter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1991 (v.8#4) pg. 77

All about meters. What you need to know to design ammeters, voltmeters, and ohmmeters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1991 (v.8#5) pg. 28
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1991 (v.8#8) pg. 4

Simple transistor circuit, configured as an RF oscillator, is used to detect changes in DC current flow. A modification allows linear responses to relatively small current changes.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1991 (v.8#9) pg. 75, 76

Increase the range of an ammeter with this simple add-on.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1994 (v.11#11) pg. 31

Using digital panel meters to enhance the look and performance of your next project. Circuits include: (1) AC power supply, (2) DC-to-DC supply, (3) DC ammeter, (4) automobile voltage monitor, (5) digital DC voltmeter, and (6) low-ohms meter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1996 (v.13#10) pg. 39
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1997 (v.14#1) pg. 6

Build an AC amp meter (ammeter).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1998 (v.15#9) pg. 40
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1998 (v.15#12) pg. 5

Automobile electrical system tester plugs into your car lighter socket. This meter supplies all the information of an ammeter while your car is operating. Est. cost: $10.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1977 (v.148#4) pg. 68

Nine-in-one troubleshooter does the work of nine individual test meters by means of one universal meter coupled with six interchangeable test modules. Part 3. Storage battery cell tester and AC ammeter.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1966 (v.188#4) pg. 192

Electrical appliance tester you can build. Check for shorts, continuity, current leakage and measure current draw.
POPULAR SCIENCE Sep 1971 (v.199#3) pg. 124

How to use split-core ammeters to test home appliances.
POPULAR SCIENCE Nov 1977 (v.211#5) pg. 150

Servo current monitor. This electronic circuit is inserted between the output from a radio control receiver and a servo. The amount of current drawn is displayed on an LED bargraph.
RADIO CONTROL MODELS & ELECTRONICS Feb 1992 (v.35#2) pg. 30

How to modify the full-scale reading of an existing voltmeter or ammeter.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1980 (v.51#11) pg. 82

How to use digital panel meters to measure voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, frequency, temperature, etc. Part 1. Voltage, current and resistance meters.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1984 (v.55#2) pg. 67

Build this clamp-on DC ammeter. This ammeter uses Hall-effect transducers to let you measure DC current using a clamp-on probe.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1984 (v.55#7) pg. 61

Circuit for a low-current ammeter uses the new OP-41 op-amp from Precision Monolithics Inc.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1986 (v.57#5) pg. 89

Op-amps show their versatility in instrumentation circuits. Includes circuits for rectifier, peak detector, AC/DC converter, voltmeter, ammeter, ohmmeter, voltage reference, and power supply.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1989 (v.60#9) pg. 59

Tips on accurately sensing or measuring an electrical current.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1991 (v.62#12) pg. 70

AC ammeter with three ranges: 0-50 ma, 0-500 ma, 0-5 amps. Includes male and female AC sockets. Est. cost: $14.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1967 (v.22#1) pg. 72

Build a hot-wire ammeter which will measure up to two amperes.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Aug-Sep 1969 (v.27#1) pg. 51

An iron vane ammeter will indicate from 0 to 1 ampere, AC or DC. A simple project built of wood, wire and a tin can.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Oct-Nov 1969 (v.27#2) pg. 61

A large-size hot wire ammeter.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 77

Moving vane ammeter works on AC and DC indicates 0 to 1 ampere.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1970-Jan 1971 (v.28#6) pg. 83

Build an electrostatic microammeter capable of measuring current from 25 millionths of an ampere to 5 billionths of an ampere in circuits that carry potential of up to 500,000 volts.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Oct 1973 (v.229#4) pg. 123

The Model A Ford ammeter. Understanding the role of an ammeter in the electrical system of an automobile. How to read and interpret what an ammeter is telling you.
SKINNED KNUCKLES #166 May 1990 (v.14#10) pg. 23

Checking your airplane's ammeter. Includes construction of a meter movement calibration test set.
SPORT AVIATION Jun 1999 (v.48#6) pg. 92

AMPLIFIER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AMPLIFIER
sa   ANTENNA AMPLIFIER
sa   AUDIO AMPLIFIER
sa   OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIER
sa   OSCILLATOR
sa   TELEPHONE AMPLIFIER
sa   VIDEO AMPLIFIER
xx   ELECTRONICS

Transformerless balanced output circuit takes the place of the usual output transformer used to balance and float the output of a single-ended circuit.
AUDIO AMATEUR 4/1975 [Mar 1976] (v.6#4) pg. 36

Pulse modulated amplifiers. Part 1. Updating pulse modulation. The theory.
AUDIO AMATEUR 1/1987 [Jan 1987] (v.18#1) pg. 6

Pulse modulated amplifiers. Part 2. Developing high quality pulse width modulation. A step-by-step guide for implementation using breadboards.
AUDIO AMATEUR 2/1987 [Mar 1987] (v.18#2) pg. 18

BASIC computer program will calculate component values for the quiescent DC bias of a triode tube amplifier.
AUDIO AMATEUR 3/1988 [Aug 1988] (v.19#3) pg. 46

Mathematical calculations used to refute the popular idea that the common-mode gain of a differential amplifier is proportional to the ratio of the load resistor to the tail resistor.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS 3/2000 [May 2000] (v.31#3) pg. 49
Added Info AUDIO ELECTRONICS 4/2000 [Jul 2000] (v.31#4) pg. 47

R.F. power transistors and amplifiers. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 32

Listen to the electrical signals generated by your heart and muscles with this amplifier which will provide a gain of about 300,000.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 106

R.F. power transistors and amplifiers. Part 2. Test setup for servicing power transistors and RF amplifiers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1979 (v.35#4) pg. 56

R.F. power transistors and amplifiers. Part 3. Conclusion discusses radiation and the effects on the human body.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1979 (v.35#5) pg. 23

The Pi-network. An explanation of everything you ever wanted to know about the pi-network.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 40

A simple solution to high-frequency amplifier circuits utilize the MAR-series of integrated devices.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1993 (v.49#1) pg. 118

Solid-state RF amplifiers for beginners.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1993 (v.49#10) pg. 62

Some remedies for unstable solid-state RF amplifiers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1994 (v.50#5) pg. 95

Solid-state RF power amplifiers. Some design tips. Looks at (1) single, parallel, or push-pull transistors, (2) amplifier gain and device choice, (3) instability, (4) proper matching, etc. Includes a schematic diagram of a practical 5 watt class-C amplifier for 7 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1995 (v.51#12) pg. 74

Multi-purpose broadband amplifier used to boost the low-power output from a crystal oscillator, VFO, or signal generator. Will produce up to 1 watt of output power from 1 MHz to 50 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 66

A catalog of practical circuits. Part 2. (1) IC audio amplifiers for operating a speaker. (2) Small-signal RF amplifiers suitable for use in receivers and transmitters and as preamplifiers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1997 (v.53#12) pg. 52

Screen overcurrent protection. Considerations in designing a power amplifier (which uses tetrodes or pentodes) to prevent damage to expensive vacuum tubes.
DX MAGAZINE Jan 1992 (v.4#1) pg. 12

Common collector amplifiers. Learn about common-collector bipolar junction transistor (BJT) amplifiers.
ELECTRONICS NOW Oct 1993 (v.64#10) pg. 57

Transistor cookbook. Learn about common-emitter and common-base bipolar transistor amplifiers.
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1993 (v.64#11) pg. 68

Potpourri of circuits utilizing bipolar junction transistors. Circuits to amplify signals, filter high and low frequencies, generate white noise, flash lamps, etc.
ELECTRONICS NOW May 1994 (v.65#5) pg. 63

Differential amplifiers, one of the most significant analog circuits of all time. A brief introduction to their operation and applications.
ELECTRONICS NOW Mar 1996 (v.67#3) pg. 49

Common-sense design of transistor amplifier. Using Ohms Law to calculate the necessary circuit components for a complete transistorized amplifier.
ELECTRONICS WORLD Jun 1967 (v.77#6) pg. 48

Utility amplifier delivers from 150 milliwatts to 1 watt depending on power supply (3-, 6-, or 12-volts). Uses an integrated circuit. High input impedance is 55,000 ohms and low input impedance is 1,000 ohms. Est. cost: $15.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1969 (v.9#2) pg. 63

How to design an additional simple transistor amplifier stage for existing equipment.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1973 (v.13#5) pg. 35

A discussion of the very simple and straightforward methods that can be used to predict the gain and DC operating conditions of an amplifier.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1974 (v.14#3) pg. 47

Bandpass amplifier turns the output from a high quality microphone into the "telephone voice" effect. Uses the type 741 op-amp.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1975 (v.15#3) pg. 84

Circuit for an equalized tape head preamplifier uses the type 741 opamp. Bargain priced tape decks can be made operational with these electronics.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1975 (v.15#3) pg. 84

Analyzing the Hedge voltage amplifier. Using PSpice for nonlinear modeling.
GLASS AUDIO 6/1999 (v.11#6) pg. 30
Added Info GLASS AUDIO 4/2000 (v.12#4) pg. 59

Audio booster amp. 20-dB booster is battery powered. Use it to provide extra power to microphone circuit, add an extra microphone input to an amplifier, convert a utility amplifier into an audio-signal tracer, etc.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Summer 1984 (v.2#1) pg. 74

Electronic fundamentals. Amplifiers.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May 1987 (v.4#5) pg. 83

The new MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuits) wideband amplifiers. Includes a circuit for a working MMIC amplifier you can build from parts.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May 1987 (v.4#5) pg. 88

Electro-mechanical circuit can amplify or oscillate without the aid of vacuum tube or solid-state device. Circuit for a two-stage amplifier also shown.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May 1987 (v.4#5) pg. 92

A simple two-stage amplifier circuit is built from telephone mike, telephone earpiece and a small speaker.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May 1987 (v.4#5) pg. 92

Electronic fundamentals. Amplification stages in amplifier design. Looks at both cascaded staging and bridging.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jun 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 77

1-MHz to 2-GHz amplifier provides up to 40 dB of gain. Tiny 9-volt powered device uses miniature 50-ohm cascadable monolithic ICs, surface mounting of components, and microwave strip-line layout of components. Est. cost: $20.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1988 (v.5#9) pg. 32

Using DC voltmeters in troubleshooting direct-coupled differential and high-gain Darlington amplifier circuits.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1990 (v.7#2) pg. 16

Q-multiplier circuit amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1964 (v.20#1) pg. 77

Class C power amplifier using one transistor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1964 (v.20#4) pg. 70

Transistor amplifier circuit exhibits 20 dB gain and AGC range of about 40 dB.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1965 (v.22#2) pg. 76

Basic line-operated solid state amplifier circuit delivering up to one watt.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1965 (v.23#5) pg. 117

Manufacturer's circuit. A unity voltage gain impedance-matching amplifier with an effective input impedance of approximately 1,250 megohms and output of 600 ohms.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1966 (v.25#1) pg. 82

Circuit for a moderate-to-high gain common-base one transistor amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1966 (v.25#3) pg. 77

Circuit for a typical transformerless IF amplifier strip employing frequency-selective electromechanical filters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1966 (v.25#3) pg. 77

Six circuits using linear integrated circuits including circuits for (1) remote control amplififer, (2) wide-band amplifier and limiter, (3) A 1-watt audio amplifier, (4) a subminiature audio amplifier, (5) a half-watt audio amplifier, and (6) bifet amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1967 (v.27#6) pg. 49

Circuit which will amplify signals up to 200 MHz. May be used in amplifiers or harmonic mixers.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1968 (v.29#3) pg. 87

Designing simple solid-state amplifier circuits for the experimenter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1972 (v.2#3) pg. 66

Typical applications of the new CDA (current differencing amplifier). Use this IC in linear or digital circuits. Use with a single 4- to 36-volt power supply.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1973 (v.3#6) pg. 61

Nine uses for the 703 monolithic amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1974 (v.5#6) pg. 67

A guide to the use of CMOS inverting stage (amplifier) in linear applications.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1974 (v.6#2) pg. 61

A simple method for biasing transistors used in a bipolar transistor amplifier.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1975 (v.7#6) pg. 42

General-purpose utility amplifier. Uses include signal tracing, sound detection, induction receiver, etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1980 (v.18#2) pg. 104

Dual chopper amplifier circuit is used to amplify a minute DC signal so that it can be read out on any digital voltmeter. The circuit works by converting the input into an AC signal, amplifying the AC, and then rectifying back to DC.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1989 (v.6#2) pg. 84

Using wideband amplifiers. Learn about amplifiers capable of handling almost any signal.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1990 (v.7#1) pg. 73

Broadband RF amplifier circuit has a usable gain of up to 100.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1990 (v.7#4) pg. 28

General-purpose amplifier is a simple circuit than can be placed in a signal path to provide any necessary signal boost.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1990 (v.7#6) pg. 27

Remote gain-controller circuit uses switches to produce a stepped, variable-gain range of from 1 to 100.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1990 (v.7#11) pg. 75

Useful RF (radio frequency) circuits. (1) RF-Sniffer can be used to hunt for RF-noise or indicate that a transmitter is operating. (2) RF-detector probe allows a DC voltmeter to indicate the presence of powerful radio waves. (3) Sensitive RF-detector probe allows a meter to detect small RF signals. (4) Wideband RF instrument amplifier. (5) Tuned or untuned RF wavemeter will provide an indication of the output level of a transmitter signal as radiated from an antenna or dummy load. (6) 100 kHz crystal calibrator RF source to calibrate receivers, sweep generators, signal generators, or other RF sources.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1991 (v.8#7) pg. 55

Build a test bench amplifier to boost low-level signals enough to drive a speaker. Can also be used as a high-frequency RF-signal tracer.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1993 (v.10#9) pg. 47

Build the "galviamp" (a galvanometer and a variable-gain amplifier) in one compact case.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1995 (v.12#7) pg. 63

All about monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers, special devices which provide decent gain from near-DC to the microwave region.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1995 (v.12#12) pg. 41

Using the current-difference linear IC amplifier (Norton amplifier) which performs similarly to the op-amp, but is better suited for certain applications.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1996 (v.13#7) pg. 49

Electronic voice substitute. Amplify a weak voice or whisper up to 1000 times. Use for fun or as a genuine aid for someone unable to talk at normal volume.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1981 (v.52#5) pg. 84

How to design analog circuits. Part 6. Amplifying AC signals.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1982 (v.53#11) pg. 67

How to design analog circuits. Part 7. Multi-stage amplifiers.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1982 (v.53#12) pg. 75

How to design analog circuits. The various types of power amplifiers and some important factors to consider when designing these circuits.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1983 (v.54#2) pg. 67

How to design analog circuits. How to use feedback.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1983 (v.54#7) pg. 68

Designing with linear IC's. Part 4. Differential and instrumentation amplifiers and how to use them.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1984 (v.55#8) pg. 66

Designing with linear IC's. Part 5. Current-difference amplifiers (CDA's) and operational transconductance amplifiers (OTA's).
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1984 (v.55#9) pg. 77

Designing with linear IC's. Part 6. The logarithmic and isolation amplifiers.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1984 (v.55#11) pg. 73

Designing with linear IC's. Part 7. Voltage-controlled amplifiers, integrators, and differentiators.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1984 (v.55#12) pg. 73

Broadband amplifier circuits like those found in modern transistorized shortwave receivers are explained.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1986 (v.57#4) pg. 105

Broadcast-band RF amplifier circuit can be added to a low- to mid-priced receiver or car radio to improve AM reception.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1987 (v.58#3) pg. 42

Build this miniature wideband amplifier. Gives a 20-dB gain for TV signals and other signals from DC to 450 MHz. Est. cost: $12.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1987 (v.58#5) pg. 45

Synchronous demodulators, an electronic multiplier that extracts the sum and the difference between your input-frequency signal and your reference switching frequency. An introduction to their operation and application. Also called autocorrellator, lock-in-amplifier, doubly balanced modulator, phase-sensitive detector, I-Q demodulator, synchronous rectifier, phase-locker, or homodyne detector.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1990 (v.61#3) pg. 58

ANALOG COMPUTER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ANALOG COMPUTER
xx   COMPUTER

Analog techniques for digital computers. Part 1. Analog computer basics.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Sep 1984 (v.22#9) pg. 24

Analog techniques for digital computers. Part 2. Additional ways to develop programs that employ analog input methods similar to those of analog computers.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Oct 1984 (v.22#10) pg. 16

Simple analog computer adds, subtracts, multiplies, divides and integrates. Est. cost: $8.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1966 (v.9#1) pg. 57

Electronic slide rule is an analog computer designed to do simple multiplication and division problems.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Sep-Oct 1968 (v.7#1) pg. 35

Project Spaceflight. A real analog computer tests your skill at piloting LEM-type spacecraft.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1975 (v.15#6) pg. 41

Vacuum tube op amps applied. How tubed operational amplifiers and analog computers were used in the 1930s-1950s to simulate design ideas. Includes several vacuum tube op amp circuits.
GLASS AUDIO 3/1992 (v.4#3) pg. 12
Correction GLASS AUDIO 1/1993 (v.5#1) pg. 36
Added Info GLASS AUDIO 2/1993 (v.5#2) pg. 35, 41
Added Info GLASS AUDIO 4/1999 (v.11#4) pg. 61

Alculator. A portable analog computer which calculates the probable blood alcohol level based on body weight, number of drinks, alcohol content of drinks, and number of hours since drinking began. Est cost: $30.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Summer 1984 (v.2#1) pg. 66

Homebrew analog computer. Reflections of Forrest M. Mims, III, on his early-1960's computer experiments.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1987 (v.4#12) pg. 39

Analog arithmetic (ratiometric measurement). A look at analog circuits that process numbers.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1990 (v.7#11) pg. 57

Analog computer circuits. Part 1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1979 (v.15#1) pg. 81

Analog computer circuits. Part 2.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1979 (v.15#2) pg. 80

Experiments with a general-purpose, single-chip analog processor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1982 (v.20#9) pg. 98

A $10 analog computer that multiplies and divides.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1964 (v.122#6) pg. 178

Just-for-fun analog computer monitors a person's alcohol intake by knowing quantity consumed, percent of alcohol, time period and body weight.
POPULAR SCIENCE Apr 1969 (v.194#4) pg. 101

IC application of the month. The XR-2208 operational multiplier is suited for both analog computation and communications signal processing applications.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1978 (v.49#4) pg. 74

Analog computer simulates Pavlov's dogs.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Jun 1963 (v.208#6) pg. 159

An entirely mechanical analog computer designed for amateur construction. Consists of screws, shafts, disks, wheels, sprockets and chains. Results are drawn on graph paper by two pens. Est. cost: $50.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Jun 1968 (v.218#6) pg. 122

ANIMAL FOOD entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ANIMAL FOOD
sa   CAT FOOD
sa   DOG FOOD
x   PET FOOD
xx   ANIMAL

How to build a pet food center. Free-standing unit is 12" deep, 20" wide and 42" tall. Open bottom compartment has space for food and water dishes. Center section is a bin that holds dry food. Top compartment will hold 20 cans of food.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1977 (v.55#1) pg. 44

How to pick a feeding dish for your pet.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1979 (v.57#1) pg. F8 (140+)

A guide to pet nutrition. Covers labeling, types of products, feeding methods, and supplements.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS May 1980 (v.58#5) pg. 226

How a small farmer can produce good quality hay and fodder with a minimum of equipment using a green mulch system.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1978 (v.62#5) pg. 27

How to dry hay in the rain the Norwegian way.
COUNTRYSIDE Jul 1978 (v.62#7) pg. 28

Cheap ways to rake hay. Two inexpensive ways. First with a hand rake and second with an old horse-drawn sulky rake converted for use with a tractor.
COUNTRYSIDE Oct 1978 (v.62#10) pg. 32

How to stack hay.
COUNTRYSIDE Nov 1978 (v.62#11) pg. 31

How to raise root vegetables for livestock feed.
COUNTRYSIDE Jan 1979 (v.63#1) pg. 36

Raising livestock feed in the garden.
COUNTRYSIDE Jan 1979 (v.63#1) pg. 37

How to fertlize your alfafa field in the fall for a strong crop in the spring.
COUNTRYSIDE Oct 1979 (v.63#10) pg. 38

How to raise and store hay for animal feed.
COUNTRYSIDE Jul 1980 (v.64#7) pg. 32

How to maximize pasture usage.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1981 (v.65#5) pg. 35

Salt block (mineral block) holder made from an old tire, two fence posts and some 2x4s.
COUNTRYSIDE Jun 1981 (v.65#6) pg. 55

Planting and growing mulberries as livestock feed.
COUNTRYSIDE Sep 1981 (v.65#9) pg. 27

How the small farmer can raise animal feed. (1) Raise, harvest and thresh wheat by hand and (2) raise non-traditional feed crops.
COUNTRYSIDE Jan 1983 (v.67#1) pg. 14

How to make silage in black plastic bags using a round baler.
COUNTRYSIDE Jan 1983 (v.67#1) pg. 40

How to make silage.
COUNTRYSIDE Mar 1983 (v.67#3) pg. 31

How to raise and use mangel beets for animal feed.
COUNTRYSIDE Mar 1983 (v.67#3) pg. 32

Homegrown feeds for homestead livestock.
COUNTRYSIDE Apr 1983 (v.67#4) pg. 10

Comfrey is not a substitute for hay.
COUNTRYSIDE Apr 1983 (v.67#4) pg. 36

More silage advice.
COUNTRYSIDE Apr 1983 (v.67#4) pg. 37

How to make silage in 55-gallon drum "silos".
COUNTRYSIDE Jun 1983 (v.67#6) pg. 36

How much and what to feed animals (goats, sheep, pigs, chickens, rabbits, and cattle).
COUNTRYSIDE Sep 1983 (v.67#9) pg. 17

Feeds and feeding. A comprehensive look at the problem of providing nutritious feed for livestock when using homegrown feeds.
COUNTRYSIDE Nov 1983 (v.67#11) pg. 15

Tips on making a haystack.
COUNTRYSIDE Jul 1984 (v.68#7) pg. 38

Planting oats and sunflower seeds for use as green feed and shade in your chicken yard.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.69#2) pg. 33

The importance of colostrum to the newborn animal.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.69#2) pg. 53

Supplementing expensive hay with grain. Includes what proportion of grain-to-hay should be used.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.69#11) pg. 14

How to establish and maintain a quality pasture.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1986 (v.70#3) pg. 36

Eight pages of articles on alfalfa. Includes tips on its culture and inoculation and on how to identify good quality alfalfa hay.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1987 (v.71#1) pg. 59

The feed conversion ratio, the homestead livestock raisers' key to profits. Specifics for rabbits, pigs and beef cattle examined.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1989 (v.73#1) pg. 25

Homegrown poultry feed. Tips on growing comfrey, kale, mangels and grain sorghum as feed for chickens.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1989 (v.73#2) pg. 34

A look at intensive grazing for milk cows.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1989 (v.73#6) pg. 23

How to monitor your livestock feeding program. Some tips.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL May-Jun 1990 (v.74#3) pg. 46

Diagram for stacking bales of hay on a wagon to give a good, stable ride.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1990 (v.74#6) pg. 21

How to measure the moisture level of hay using an accurate scale and a microwave.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1991 (v.75#1) pg. 30

Techniques for providing water to cattle that are intensively grazed in paddocks.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1991 (v.75#1) pg. 31

Small-scale silage-making. How to make grass and corn silage, 800 pounds at a time, in large polyethylene bags.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL May-Jun 1991 (v.75#3) pg. 14
Added Info COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1991 (v.75#4) pg. 26
Added Info COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1991 (v.75#6) pg. 8
Added Info COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1992 (v.76#1) pg. 8

Advice on better grazing management and how to use stock flow maps.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1991 (v.75#4) pg. 25

Techniques for livestock raisers when dealing with drought.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL May-Jun 1992 (v.76#3) pg. 22

Growing comfrey for green feed and hay.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1992 (v.76#6) pg. 25

Tips to make it easier to water livestock in winter.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1993 (v.77#6) pg. 40

Grow feed for animals. Tips on planting and raising corn, soybeans, peas, sunflowers, small grains, mangel beets, carrots, turnips, jerusalem artichokes, potatoes, comfrey and hay in a small garden.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1994 (v.78#2) pg. 17

A feed bunk for sheep, goats, and calves. Features a leg-attaching technique that will not loosen up as the feed bunk weathers and is jostled by animals.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1994 (v.78#5) pg. 43

Growing and using corn for sheep feed.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL May-Jun 1997 (v.81#3) pg. 56

Managing pastureland. Includes a guide to what weeds tell about the soil condition.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1997 (v.81#4) pg. 30

How to test the moisture content of hay using a microwave oven.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1997 (v.81#4) pg. 32

Build a hay manger for goats.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Nov-Dec 2000 (v.84#6) pg. 70

Build an indestructible tub feeder from old tires and lumber.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Jan-Feb 2002 (v.86#1) pg. 66

Game feeder controller is an alternative to a factory-built timer. Equipped with a light-activated switch, this device will turn on your feeder twice a day (morning and evening). Est. cost: $20.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1989 pg. 113

Dispenser for dry pet food, bird seed, etc. is made from a length of cardboard Sonotube fitted with plywood top and bottom. The pellets are dispensed from the bottom using a simple open/close mechanism.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #385 Feb 1998 (v.48#2) pg. 107

An introduction to haying for the city-born person.
HARROWSMITH #29 Aug 1980 (v.5#1) pg. 80

Formulating economical poultry (chicken) feeds which provide sound nutrition.
HARROWSMITH #39 Nov 1981 (v.6#3) pg. 91

Using fava beans for animal feed.
HARROWSMITH #47 Feb-Mar 1983 (v.7#5) pg. 60

Well-managed meadows. Making the most of small farm pastures.
HARROWSMITH #54 Apr-May 1984 (v.8#6) pg. 68

Veterinary advice looks at the kind of foods which can be dangerous to the ruminant (cow, sheep, goat or reindeer).
HARROWSMITH #57 Oct-Nov 1984 (v.9#3) pg. 123
Correction HARROWSMITH #58 Dec 1984-Jan 1985 (v.9#4) pg. 9

The art of hand haying. Includes instructions for selecting and using a scyth and for raking and baling the hay. Also includes instructions for making a wooden hay rake.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #57 May-Jun 1979 pg. 63

Tip: Old tires help keep stock watering tanks free from ice.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #67 Jan-Feb 1981 pg. 52

Tip: How to open grain-filled bags of the style that are sewn shut.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #68 Mar-Apr 1981 pg. 9

No-nonsense feed carts. Cut 55-gallon drums in half (lengthwise), put them on wheels, and you have a portable feed wagon with a hinged top.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #74 Mar-Apr 1982 pg. 178

A look at raising intercropped soybeans and millet for farm animal forage.
ORGANIC GARDENING Feb 1977 (v.24#2) pg. 214

Wild plants and common garden weeds that are good fodder for animals.
ORGANIC GARDENING May 1977 (v.24#5) pg. 84

A look at the vitamin and mineral requirements of livestock and suggestions on how to improve an animal's diet.
ORGANIC GARDENING Jun 1978 (v.25#6) pg. 118

Automatic waterer for rabbits (and other small animals) is made from a pop bottle and a tin can.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1981 (v.37#4) pg. 12

ANIMAL entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ANIMAL
sa   ANIMAL CONTROL
sa   ANIMAL DECORATIONS & ORNAMENTS
sa   ANIMAL DRAWING & PAINTING
sa   ANIMAL FIGURE
sa   ANIMAL FOOD
sa   ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
sa   ANIMAL PHOTOGRAPHY
sa   BAT (ANIMAL)
sa   BIRD
sa   CAT
sa   CATTLE
sa   DEER
sa   DOG
sa   DONKEY & MULE
sa   FROG
sa   GOAT
sa   GOPHER
sa   HOG
sa   HORSE
sa   LLAMA
sa   MOLE
sa   RABBIT
sa   RACCOON
sa   REPTILE
sa   RODENT
sa   SHEEP
sa   SKUNK
sa   SQUIRREL
sa   TOAD
sa   TURTLE
sa   WOODCHUCK
sa   WORM
x   LIVESTOCK
x   PET
x   WILDLIFE
xx   BIOLOGY

Tips on things you can do to make a pet feel more at home in a new house.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1974 (v.52#4) pg. J4 (146+)

Suggestions on how to administer first aid to a pet. Covers situations involving burns, shock, environmental exposure, hypothermia, fractures and poisonings.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1974 (v.52#7) pg. 98

How to care for caged pets. An explanation of the care and keeping of guinea pigs, hamsters and rabbits.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1974 (v.52#10) pg. 36

How to care for caged pets. Article covers gerbils, rats and mice.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Nov 1974 (v.52#11) pg. 64

Ten summer pet health care tips.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1976 (v.54#6) pg. 22

How to choose a boarding kennel for your pet. Suggests how to inspect the kennel and what services to expect.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1977 (v.55#6) pg. 176

How to cut down on veterinarian bills.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1977 (v.55#9) pg. 240

Basic information on birth control for pets. A look at surgical and chemical alternatives.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1977 (v.55#10) pg. 272

How to help your pet in winter weather. Guidelines on winter rations, cold-weather grooming, snow and ice trouble, and on making housing warm and dry.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Nov 1977 (v.55#11) pg. 266

How to care for an old pet. Tips on preventing problems, monitoring diet, grooming, changes in quarters, and major illnesses to be alert for.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1978 (v.56#2) pg. 170

How to choose and care for mini-pets (mice, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs and rabbits).
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1978 (v.56#3) pg. 208

How to choose a veterinarian.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1978 (v.56#4) pg. 240

A chart of common pet emergencies, the symptoms and first aid you can apply.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Aug 1978 (v.56#8) pg. 162

How to get your pet to take medicine.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Nov 1978 (v.56#11) pg. 238

Basic information on pet registration.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1979 (v.57#2) pg. 92

How to keep your pet parasite-free. Fighting fleas, lice, ticks and mites.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1979 (v.57#6) pg. 204

Shopping for giveaway pets. Where to look, checking out the prospects and how to cope with special problems.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Aug 1979 (v.57#8) pg. 138

A rundown of common rights and responsibilities of pet ownership.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Sep 1979 (v.57#9) pg. 19

Pet grooming pointers.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1979 (v.57#10) pg. 200

Ten ways to save on veterinary care without compromising your pet's health.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1980 (v.58#3) pg. 185

How to track down your pet's allergy.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1980 (v.58#4) pg. 176

Basic guidelines for selecting a new pet for a household that already has one or more.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1981 (v.59#2) pg. 72

Tips on pet grooming.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1981 (v.59#3) pg. 151

Can a pet be a threat to your family's health? A look at the most common ailments that can be transmitted from animals to humans.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1981 (v.59#4) pg. 183

Basic information for dealing with pet emergencies. First aid you can administer.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS May 1981 (v.59#5) pg. 180

How to help your pet beat the heat.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1981 (v.59#6) pg. 83

How to help your pet adjust to a new home.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Aug 1981 (v.59#8) pg. 164

A look at caged pets and tips on what is required for each. Covers gerbils, hamsters, parakeets and canaries.
BOYS' LIFE Aug 1973 (v.63#8) pg. 36

Emergency care for your pet.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1981 (v.71#10) pg. 76

The basics of caring for caged pets (hamsters, gerbils, mice, rats and guinea pigs).
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1986 (v.76#10) pg. 19

Picking the perfect pet. Guidelines to help decide which animal will suit you best and tips on where to find one.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1997 (v.87#10) pg. 14

Tips for handling pet emergencies.
BOYS' LIFE Aug 1998 (v.88#8) pg. 12

Creature control. A humane approach to ridding your home of nuisance animals.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Oct 1988 (v.12#1) pg. 51

A summary of common internal parasites that infect pets and information on prevention and/or treatment.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1978 (v.62#5) pg. 40

Tips on nursing care for sick animals. Specific tips for dogs and cats, goats and sheep, calves, and horses.
COUNTRYSIDE Nov 1978 (v.62#11) pg. 58

Cold weather livestock care.
COUNTRYSIDE Oct 1979 (v.63#10) pg. 24

Some tips on giving injections to livestock.
COUNTRYSIDE Apr 1980 (v.64#4) pg. 27

Eight articles on helping your animal through the birth process.
COUNTRYSIDE Feb 1981 (v.65#2) pg. 16

Selling surplus homestead animals.
COUNTRYSIDE Jun 1981 (v.65#6) pg. 21

Tips on working with oxen. Includes harness ideas and diagram of a "log skoot" sled for hauling logs.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1983 (v.67#5) pg. 36

Tip on curing an umbilical hernia using an elastic bandgage.
COUNTRYSIDE May 1983 (v.67#5) pg. 38

Plan your animals' housing with care. Things to consider before you start to build a barn.
COUNTRYSIDE Feb 1984 (v.68#2) pg. 25

Tips on training animals selected for labor.
COUNTRYSIDE Jun 1984 (v.68#6) pg. 26

The importance of animal watching, a necessary part of animal husbandry and successful livestock raising.
COUNTRYSIDE Jan 1985 (v.69#1) pg. 36

How one family keeps all their animals under one roof in a 36x38-ft. barn.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1988 (v.72#5) pg. 48

Special ALMANAC issue includes many measurement tables, statistical tables, formulas, tips and techniques. Topics covered include field, garden, livestock, cooking, equipment, measurements, wood heating and folklore.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1989 (v.73#2) pg. 22

Moon signs. A look at planting and managing livestock by the moon signs.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1989 (v.73#2) pg. 56

Calculating medication dosages for small livestock for both dry and liquid doses.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1992 (v.76#5) pg. 30

How to care for your pet's ears. Tips on removing wax, excess hair or fur, and prevention of ear infection from mites.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jan 9 1978 (v.91#1) pg. 42

How to help your pet avoid heat stroke and what to do if any of the symptoms are exhibited.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jul 17 1979 (v.92#10) pg. 168

How to travel with pets.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 3 1980 (v.93#8) pg. 27

Tip: Battery-powered radio set in the middle of a garden keeps night animals away.
FLOWER & GARDEN Aug-Sep 1981 (v.25#5) pg. 8

Keeping animals out of your garden. Some tips.
FLOWER & GARDEN Jun-Jul 1983 (v.27#4) pg. 30

Electronic "critter ridders". (1) Audible Critter Chaser is designed to flood an area with a continuous high-frequency tone to frighten away dogs and other four-legged intruders. (2) Pest Zapper electrifies a fence.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Oct 1988 (v.5#10) pg. 96

Tips on how to keep beavers from destroying a wood lot development.
HARROWSMITH #26 Mar 1980 (v.4#6) pg. 15

Livestock in winter. How to protect various farm animals from the bad side effects of cold winter weather.
HARROWSMITH #46 Dec 1982-Jan 1983 (v.7#4) pg. 44

Animal pharmacy: A basic medicine chest for livestock and pets. Special mention is made for those items used for cows, pigs, sheep, dogs and cats.
HARROWSMITH #70 Nov-Dec 1986 (v.11#4) pg. 91

Carving nesting boxes in dead tree stubs for birds and mammals. Chart shows dimensions for different species.
HARROWSMITH #78 Mar-Apr 1988 (v.12#6) pg. 12

Tips on eliminating cats, skunks and squirrels from a yard.
HARROWSMITH #85 May-Jun 1989 (v.14#1) pg. 126
Added Info HARROWSMITH #86 Jul-Aug 1989 (v.14#2) pg. 10
Added Info HARROWSMITH #88 Nov-Dec 1989 (v.14#4) pg. 10

Little pets for little people. Alternatives to getting a puppy or kitten for small children.
HARROWSMITH #112 Dec 1993 (v.18#4) pg. 20

Please don't eat the garden. Techniques to protect trees and plants from deer, rabbits, mice, and other animals and birds.
HOME MECHANIX #726 Oct 1988 (v.84) pg. 98

Control tips for ants, roaches, mosquitos, slugs, mealybugs, fleas, raccoons, squirrels, chipmunks, and skunks.
HOME MECHANIX #735 Jul 1989 (v.85) pg. 10

Custom-fitted wire mesh protects indoor potted plants from digging by cats or dogs.
HOME MECHANIX #738 Oct 1989 (v.85) pg. 37

Tips on helping your pet avoid illness.
HOMEOWNER Jul-Aug 1986 (v.11#6) pg. 18

How to restrain an animal while giving it an injection. Covers rabbits, fowl, sheep, goats, pigs and cattle.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #52 Jul-Aug 1978 pg. 84

How to give your livestock medical injections.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #53 Sep-Oct 1978 pg. 92

How to treat your pets and livestock with topical and oral medications.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #54 Nov-Dec 1978 pg. 77

How to deal with internal parasites. Part 1.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #56 Mar-Apr 1979 pg. 77

How to deal with internal livestock parasites. Part 2.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #57 May-Jun 1979 pg. 56

Ten commandments for healthy livestock.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #58 Jul-Aug 1979 pg. 73

Tips on how to get free livestock.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #60 Nov-Dec 1979 pg. 120

Tips on how a homesteader can cut veterinary bills.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #61 Jan-Feb 1980 pg. 142

A primer on vaccinations for small livestock.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #66 Nov-Dec 1980 pg. 66

How to start and run a home-style animal care business for vacationing pet owners.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #76 Jul-Aug 1982 pg. 106

Build a freezeproof solar-heated water trough for your livestock.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #78 Nov-Dec 1982 pg. 68

Tip: Use two bathroom scales and a plank to weigh livestock.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #82 Jul-Aug 1983 pg. 39

Helping injured or orphaned wildlife. Some tips.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #88 Jul-Aug 1984 pg. 116

A short course in dealing with animal emergencies. Tips on how to recognize conditions that warrant veterinary attention and suggestions on transporting an injured pet.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #103 Jan-Feb 1987 pg. 26

How to prepare expectant animals for motherhood. The essentials for newborns' first few hours are noted. Tips on special considerations for births of individual species.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #104 Mar-Apr 1987 pg. 36

Taking on livestock. Part 1. How to choose the right food-producing animal for your country home. A look at bees, poultry and rabbits.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #104 Mar-Apr 1987 pg. 56
Added Info MOTHER EARTH NEWS #105 May-Jun 1987 pg. 14

Taking on livestock. Part 2. How to choose mid-sized and large animals for a country home. Covers pigs, sheep, dairy goats, riding horses, draft horses, milk cows and beef cattle.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #105 May-Jun 1987 pg. 81

Advice on selecting an appropriate pet for a small child, preparing for the pet's arrival, basic rules of health, etc.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #109 Jan-Feb 1988 pg. 18

Tip: Dog hair keeps ground hogs, raccoons, and other animals away from garden.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #111 May-Jun 1988 pg. 16

Choosing a veterinarian for your pet. Ten questions to ask a prospective vet.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #111 May-Jun 1988 pg. 38

Coping with crop culprits. Tips on controlling gophers and moles, deer, ground hogs, raccoons and skunks, dogs and cats, and rabbits.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #112 Jul-Aug 1988 pg. 42

Choosing a pet. Some tips.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #113 Sep-Oct 1988 pg. 21

Tips on keeping domestic ferrets as pets.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #114 Nov-Dec 1988 pg. 30

Tips on giving your pet a routine physical exam, plus reasons for having an annual physical exam performed by a professional.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #114 Nov-Dec 1988 pg. 46

First aid basics for handling an animal emergency. Advice on treating cuts, fractures, burns and poisonings.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #148 Feb-Mar 1995 pg. 84

Tips on how to keep rabbits, woodchucks, squirrels, raccoons, deer, gophers and birds from ruining a garden or fruit crop.
ORGANIC GARDENING Aug 1977 (v.24#8) pg. 91

How to make your own dry shampoo, herbal rinse, and pedicure lotion for pets.
ORGANIC GARDENING Feb 1980 (v.27#2) pg. 148

Tip: How to keep groundhogs (woodchucks) from tunneling underneath wire fences.
ORGANIC GARDENING Mar 1983 (v.30#3) pg. 22

Tip: Inflated balloons, tied to pegged clothespins and planted around the permieter of a garden, discourages both birds and critters.
ORGANIC GARDENING May 1988 (v.35#5) pg. 93

Tip: Use a light as skunk repellent.
ORGANIC GARDENING Nov 1989 (v.36#10) pg. 71

Tip: Build a special screen panel for the opening of a sliding patio screen door. Bottom section of the panel has a rubber flap so a pet can go out and come in. Panel can be removed to close the regular door completely.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1979 (v.215#1) pg. 117

How to train a mouse.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Jan 1964 (v.35#1) pg. 64

Observing small mammals (wild animals) found in your own backyard (squirrel, chipmunk, opossum, etc.).
SCIENCE PROBE! Apr 1992 (v.2#2) pg. 48

An apparatus for simulating high altitudes and testing their effects on small animals.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Sep 1965 (v.213#3) pg. 239

An amateur's experiments in animal behavior.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Dec 1966 (v.215#6) pg. 135

An easily constructed apparatus for measuring the metabolic rate of small animals. Includes a series of experiments that disclose facts about the chemistry of animals.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Jul 1969 (v.221#1) pg. 122

How to build and operate a Skinner box for the training of small animals. Includes two conditioning experiments, one involving the dispensing of food when a lever is pushed and another that also requires turning on a light.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Nov 1975 (v.233#5) pg. 128

How to become a wildlife volunteer to aid injured wildlife.
SUNSET Mar 1984 (v.172#3) pg. 40

Guidelines on special care and attention for older pets.
WOMAN'S DAY Nov 22 1979 (v.43#3) pg. 62

Advice on how to banish troublesome insects and animals from your house.
WOMAN'S DAY Jun 12 1984 (v.47#11) pg. 34

ANTENNA entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ANTENNA
sa   AM RADIO ANTENNA
sa   ANTENNA -- 2 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 6 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 10 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 15 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 20 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 40 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 75 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 80 METER
sa   ANTENNA -- 160 METER
sa   ANTENNA AMPLIFIER
sa   ANTENNA ANALYZER
sa   ANTENNA FEEDER
sa   ANTENNA GROUNDING
sa   ANTENNA MOUNT
sa   ANTENNA ROTATOR
sa   ANTENNA SWITCH
sa   ANTENNA TUNER
sa   AVIATION RADIO ANTENNA
sa   CB RADIO ANTENNA
sa   FM RADIO ANTENNA
sa   LOW FREQUENCY RADIO ANTENNA
sa   MARINE RADIO ANTENNA
sa   MOBILE RADIO ANTENNA
sa   PACKET RADIO ANTENNA
sa   RADIO SCANNER ANTENNA
sa   SATELLITE RADIO ANTENNA
sa   SATELLITE TELEVISION ANTENNA
sa   STANDING-WAVE RATIO METER
sa   TELEVISION ANTENNA
x   AERIAL
x   AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNA
x   RADIO ANTENNA
x   SHORTWAVE RADIO ANTENNA
xx   ELECTRONICS
xx   RADIO

How to add a headphone system to a stereo. Also, how to hook into a television antenna to improve radio reception of your stereo set.
BOYS' LIFE Feb 1980 (v.70#2) pg. 12

Diagram of a 6 meter ground plane and 6 meter beam antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1979 (v.35#1) pg. 51

A "pipe organ" multiband vertical antenna covers the 10, 15, 20, 40 and 75 meter bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1979 (v.35#1) pg. 68

How to design and build large quad antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1979 (v.35#1) pg. 74

Diagram of a modified loop antenna for use on 40 and 80 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 44

Diagram of a compact 40-20 meter loop antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 45

Diagram of 80-40 meter sloper antenna wires connected to a 34-ft tower.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 45

Antenna design and construction guidelines for the UHF/VHF amateur bands. Emphasis is on small and simple yagi units.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1979 (v.35#3) pg. 50

A switchable Quad antenna for 20 meters features four half-loops joined at the top. Pairs of half-loops are used to form the full-wave loops which function either as radiator or as driven reflectors.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1979 (v.35#4) pg. 61

A portable, take-apart two-meter yagi (4x4 array) is made from easily boltable members of wood and standard TV mast sections. Has a power gain of 20 and is direct fed.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1979 (v.35#4) pg. 64

A multi-mode beam for CB and 10 meters with an option for 2 meters. A novel tri-band log periodic yagi design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1979 (v.35#5) pg. 26

Three designs for ground plane antennas for 40 and 80 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1979 (v.35#6) pg. 40

Plans for a low-profile quad antenna for 10, 15 and 20 meters. An improved version of a 3 bander described in the Dec 1976 issue.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1979 (v.35#6) pg. 54

Design for a wideband 80 meter sloper antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1979 (v.35#7) pg. 42

Diagram & dimensions for a quad loop feed antenna system featured in a Japanese magazine. It looks like a version of the 80 meter coaxial dipole design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1979 (v.35#9) pg. 77

Diagram of a zigzag sloper antenna for 40 and 15 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1979 (v.35#10) pg. 79

Diagram for a simple 40 meter vertical beam antenna using a folded unipole and three sloper reflectors.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1979 (v.35#10) pg. 79

Diagram for a pair of Bi-Square loops with dimensions for a 10 meter antenna. A relay selects which one of the pair to activate.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1979 (v.35#10) pg. 80

Diagram for an all-band (10-160 meters) antenna which uses a 4-BTV vertical with traps using B&W inductors.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1979 (v.35#10) pg. 81

Build this 160 meter vertical antenna which rises some 56 feet above the roof level.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1979 (v.35#11) pg. 66

Build a two-band vertical monpole antenna covering 40 and 75 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1979 (v.35#12) pg. 26

Complete construction details for a 4 bay stacked 432 MHz beam antenna for restricted coverage areas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1980 (v.36#1) pg. 27

Diagram of an 80 meter sloper antenna hung from a 72 foot tower.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1980 (v.36#1) pg. 59

Modify your present yagi beam antenna to cover entire bands, such as 220 and 420, with a single beam.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1980 (v.36#2) pg. 42

Diagram for (1) multiple inverted-v antenna for 80 meters and (2) driven element of a multi-band monster QUAD which covers 10,15,20, and 40 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1980 (v.36#2) pg. 62

How to design v.h.f. and u.h.f. antenna arrays using techniques developed for the lower frequencies, namely the "long wire" family of antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 36

An inexpensive feedthrough system for antenna cables. A length of plastic pipe and two elbows will conduct cables through a wall.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 63

Twenty five years of antenna wisdom. Part 1. Glossary of antenna terms and concepts.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1980 (v.36#3) pg. 97

Repeater-working antennas for the amateur in rural areas. Two styles shown (1-1/4 and 3/4 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1980 (v.36#4) pg. 18

Twenty five years of antenna wisdom. Part 2. Glossary of antenna terms and concepts.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1980 (v.36#4) pg. 25

Spark-gap arrestor can limit static build-up and offer protection from lightning strikes on amateur radio antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1980 (v.36#4) pg. 44

A delta beam antenna for 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 20

Twenty five years of antenna wisdom. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 32

High S.W.R. protection for transceivers and amplifiers. This system allows a transceiver to be used with any antenna (or no antenna) without damage to the radio.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 63

A high gain horn antenna for 220 and 420 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1980 (v.36#5) pg. 88

A discone antenna for 10 and 6 meters and lo-band public service monitoring.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1980 (v.36#6) pg. 74

Twenty five years of antenna wisdom. Part 4.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1980 (v.36#6) pg. 86

The dipole antenna. Part 1. Elementary dipoles.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 22

A stacked log periodic yagi for six meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 37

The 80 meter pyramid antenna requires less room than an 80 meter beam.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1980 (v.36#7) pg. 94

The dipole antenna. Part 2. Some major dipole variations including the T2FD (terminated tilted folded dipole).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1980 (v.36#8) pg. 54
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1988 (v.44#6) pg. 52
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1989 (v.45#1) pg. 90
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1989 (v.45#9) pg. 60

A three band array for 144, 220, and 432 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1980 (v.36#8) pg. 74

H.F. vertical antennas. Part 1. The simpler forms.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1980 (v.36#9) pg. 22

The ultra-yagi. A basic yagi design that can be scaled for 1-1/4, 2, 6, and 10 meters. Uses a diagonal reflector system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1980 (v.36#9) pg. 44

Description of just how an antenna works.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1980 (v.36#9) pg. 71

H.F. vertical antennas. Part 2. Popular variations on basic vertical designs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1980 (v.36#10) pg. 70

A log periodic antenna for all v.h.f. and u.h.f. bands. Will work from 48 MHz to 148 MHz and harmonically operate on 220 and 420 also.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1980 (v.36#10) pg. 82

H.F. vertical antennas. Part 3. Trap verticals.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1980 (v.36#11) pg. 38

Center mounting an antenna on a mobile home. Uses a farmers harrowing disk for the vertical mounting base.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1980 (v.36#11) pg. 44

A multi-band, multi-purpose helix antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1980 (v.36#11) pg. 52

More on dipoles: Multiband antennas with tuned feeders.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1980 (v.36#12) pg. 40

Make a dipole antenna from a "Slinky" toy (metal version, not plastic).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1980 (v.36#12) pg. 43

Updated version of two off-center-fed Hertz or Windom antennas from the 1930s and 1940s.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1981 (v.37#1) pg. 30

Multiband antennas: The trap dipole. Part 1. How it works.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1981 (v.37#2) pg. 40

Multiband antennas: The trap dipole. Part 2. Installing and adjusting.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 38

Diagram show how best to orient your yagi antenna during high winds.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 94

Long-wire antennas. Part 1. Popular long-wire types.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1981 (v.37#4) pg. 44

The Yagi antenna. Why it is so popular with amateurs and what it will do.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1981 (v.37#4) pg. 55

Build a helical quad antenna for 3/4 meters, UHF public service and UHF television.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1981 (v.37#5) pg. 36

Long-wire antennas. Part 2. Feeding and matching the long-wire.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1981 (v.37#5) pg. 38

A three-band "ice cream hole" vertical antenna for 10, 15, and 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1981 (v.37#6) pg. 9

Improving antenna performance. Some sound and easy to understand advice.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1981 (v.37#6) pg. 32

Antennas for the listener. Part 1. What to use for shortwave receiving. Looks at randomwire, dipoles, and verticals.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1981 (v.37#6) pg. 49

The HR-5 5 band antenna. A rotary element for 14, 18, 21, 24, 28 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 12

Modifying and improving the Gotham Tri-Band quad antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 24

A budget-wise forty meter vertical antenna uses a horizontal plastic covered steel clothesline as the ground plane. The clothesline is still used to hang out the wash.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 34

Build a portable, steerable high gain rhombic antenna for 432 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 36

Primer of lightning protection. How to protect your ham antenna and gear from a lightning strike.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 42

Antennas for the listener. Part 2. Tuneup aids for the shortwave antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 44

The "J" antenna. Some sound advice and long experience on this simple 2-meter antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 56

Build a two meter antenna for 89 cents.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1981 (v.37#7) pg. 106

The frugal fifteen. An outstanding 15 meter antenna that's cheap. Est. cost: $15.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 8
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1981 (v.37#10) pg. 60

A primer: The cubical quad antenna. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 20

More on antennas for the shortwave listener.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1981 (v.37#8) pg. 40

A primer: The cubical quad antenna. Part 2. Picking the right quad for the job.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1981 (v.37#12) pg. 18

Computer program (written in BASIC) will determine the specifications for a loaded dipole antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1981 (v.37#12) pg. 44

How to string Vee-beam and rhombic "long wire" antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1981 (v.37#12) pg. 55

Three experimental antennas for 15 meters. (1) A half-wave square loop. (2) 3-element beam. (3) 5-element beam.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1983 (v.39#1) pg. 44

Antenna accessories for the hamshack. Part 4. R.F. switch and lightening protective devices.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1983 (v.39#1) pg. 105

The 30 meter band. How to modify some currently available gear for 30 meters, plus antenna hints for getting the signal out.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 17

Antenna accessories for the hamshack. Part 5. R.F.I. meter and field strength meter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1983 (v.39#2) pg. 56

Antenna accessories for the hamshack. Part 6. (1) Antenna noise bridge. (2) Grid-dip oscillator.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1983 (v.39#3) pg. 72

Make a cover for an antenna coil from a 2-liter plastic soda bottle.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 30

The HR-52 antenna. A 5-band 2-element beam for 14, 18, 21, 24.5 and 28 MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 32

A penny-pinching 10 meter apartment antenna. 10 meter half-wave dipole does not require loading coils. Est. cost: $10.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 44

A 160 meter vertical antenna that can be raised and lowered by one person. Made from a 20-ft. piece of 2" diameter irrigation pipe and a short piece of PVC pipe.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 46

Chart for determining counterpoise lengths for 160 meter vertical antennas based on the formula 240/f(MHz).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 75

Antenna accessories for the ham shack. Part 7. R.F. signal generator, frequency counter, absorption wavemeter, frequency meter, and Lecher wires.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 82

Simple do-it-yourself antennas for 10, 15, & 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1983 (v.39#4) pg. 97

5-band Windom antenna will work only on "even" harmonics.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1983 (v.39#5) pg. 56

80-meter antenna for a mobile home effectively uses the roof of the mobile home as part of the antenna. Also works on 20, 15, and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1983 (v.39#5) pg. 57

Dipole antennas. Part 1. A series written for the newcomer to amateur radio.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1983 (v.39#5) pg. 108

Dipole antennas. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 48

Double-bazooka (coaxial dipole) antenna is based on a single-band coaxial design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 103

Folded dipole antenna is a very simple approach to increasing bandwidth in single-band operation on the lower bands (80 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1983 (v.39#6) pg. 104

Dipole antennas. Part 3.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1983 (v.39#7) pg. 89

The open-sleeve antenna. Development of a dipole and monopole open-sleeve for h.f. and v.h.f. amateur applications.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 13

Parallel verticals. A broadband antenna covering six bands (80, 40, 30, 20, 15, 10) without traps. Antenna is 25-ft. tall.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 20
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 6

Development and construction of "V" beam antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 28

Build a 2 meter J-pole antenna from copper plumbing fittings. Est. cost: $4.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 38

Writing amateur radio antenna design programs in BASIC for your personal computer.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 44

An unconventional sloping "L" antenna for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1983 (v.39#8) pg. 86

Antenna ideas for 30 meters. (1) simple dipole. (2) quarter-wave vertical.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1983 (v.39#9) pg. 52

Development of a triband (160, 80, 40 meter) quarter-wave sloper antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1983 (v.39#10) pg. 38

Dimensions for four different styles of 30 meter antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1983 (v.39#10) pg. 70

The turnstyler. A circular, polarized, portable, self-supporting array for 2 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1983 (v.39#11) pg. 66

The evolution of the four-element, double-driven quad antenna for 20, 15 and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 30

Mobile home antenna utilizes the aluminum sheeting covering the edges and undersides of the eaves.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 94

Construction design program written in BASIC for a two-element Quad amateur radio antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1983 (v.39#12) pg. 99

An antenna system to remember. Part 1. One man's "ultimate" antenna system took 20 years to plan.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1984 (v.40#1) pg. 52

Modified Windom antenna for 15 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1984 (v.40#1) pg. 65

2-meter "shirt-pocket" J-pole antenna is made from 54" of TV twin lead.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1984 (v.40#1) pg. 66

An antenna system to remember. Part 2. Conclusion. Using a 15 ton crane to erect the mast.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1984 (v.40#2) pg. 36

Five-element beam antenna for 2-meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1984 (v.40#2) pg. 63

A 3.5 to 30 MHz discage antenna. Includes a circuit for an 80-, 160-meter bandswitching antenna matcher.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 18

Improving vertical antenna efficiency. A study of radial wire ground systems.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 24

Traveling-wave antennas. Some basic information.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 32

The grounded half-quad loop. An all-band antenna small enough to fit on a city lot.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 37

The "Zimbeam". How to construct and use phased-beam antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 40

Designing a two-band loaded vertical antenna. Includes a computer program written in BASIC.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 46

How to build a quick and easy 15 meter QRP mobile antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 58

Tip: How to utilize a string and helium-filled balloons to get an antenna wire to the top of a tall tree.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 68

The preparation and use of bamboo poles for quads. How to reinforce bamboo poles with fiberglass gauze drywall tape and epoxy resin.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 98

The "hidden" apartment antenna. Simple circuit for a four-band (40, 20, 15, and 10 meter) tabletop antenna only 28" tall.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1984 (v.40#4) pg. 100

How to build a cheap and easy r.f. noise bridge. It is used to measure the impedance of an antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1984 (v.40#5) pg. 56

A cheap, easy-to-build 10 meter beam antenna is made from PVC water pipe and antenna wire.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1984 (v.40#6) pg. 32

Computer program in BASIC calculates the exact positon of the moon. Gives azimuth and elevation coordinates, Greenwich hour angle, declination, and right ascension. Useful for aiming radio antennas for signal bouncing.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1984 (v.40#7) pg. 28

A flexible tape antenna for 2 meter handhelds. Made from a 19" length of steel tape measure.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1984 (v.40#7) pg. 36

An automatic antenna selector for the Kenwood TS-430S. Est. cost: $30. Includes tips on applying the same technique to other rigs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 18

Exploring the vagaries of traps. Looks at parallel resonate circuits as they are used in multiband antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 32

Dissecting loop antennas to find out what makes them work.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 36

How to design a real estate efficient antenna farm. Part 1. Planning and tower considerations.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 44

Details for constructing a coaxial inverted "L" antenna for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 72

The sky plane antenna. Make a single-element "Bobtail Curtain" antenna for omnidirectional propagation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1984 (v.40#8) pg. 108

How to design a real estate efficient antenna farm. Part 2. Installation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1984 (v.40#9) pg. 80

How to adjust antennas. A simple hands-on method is described.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1984 (v.40#12) pg. 60

Three designs of windom antennas are illustrated. (1) 130 ft. 6-band windom. (2) 130 ft. paralleled windom for coverage of a wide variety of h.f. frequency bands. (3) 5-band BBBC windom for 40, 30, 20, 15, and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1985 (v.41#1) pg. 103

How to build a three element 2 meter quad antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.41#2) pg. 29
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1985 (v.41#5) pg. 8

How to build cheap and easy 2 meter antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.41#2) pg. 78

Vertical antenna grounding systems.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1985 (v.41#2) pg. 94

Very simple and inexpensive multiband dipole antenna is 102 ft. overall length fed with a 33 ft. length of open wire line or a 29 ft. length of twin lead.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 64

A horizontal loop antenna for 40 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1985 (v.41#3) pg. 105

Homebrewing antennas from commonly available copper and brass stock.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 28

Inverted "L" antenna for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 38

Scaling the coaxial double bazooka antenna for 30 meter operation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 71

Inexpensive G5RV multiband dipole antenna for 80, 40, 30, 20, 15, and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 72

How to convert a citizens band antenna to 2 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 74

Basic dimensions for a centerfed Zepp, a dipole multiband antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 80

A description of three HF vertical antennas of the "cheap and dirty" variety.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1985 (v.41#4) pg. 80

An introduction to the loop antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1985 (v.41#7) pg. 92

How to build a 80 and 30 meter trapped dipole antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1985 (v.41#8) pg. 26

The Minipoise antenna system, a small but efficient low frequency antenna. Includes construction data for 40, 80, and 160 meter versions.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1985 (v.41#8) pg. 30

The tilted terminated folded dipole (T2FD) antenna revisited. Covers all high frequency bands with a SWR of 1:2 or less.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1985 (v.41#8) pg. 42

Essential construction details of a practical Beverage antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1985 (v.41#8) pg. 96

Layout and dimensions for two basic "quick and easy" 12 meter antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1985 (v.41#9) pg. 40

More information on the G5RV multiband dipole antenna covering the 80-10 meter range.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 78

A back-to-back J-stub antenna. Covers the 15, 20, 40, and 80 meter bands.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 79

Unorthodox piggyback inverted Vee antenna for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1985 (v.41#10) pg. 79

Diagram for a full-wave delta loop antenna used to good effect on 40 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1985 (v.41#11) pg. 76

One method for measuring antenna gain. Requires two identical antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1985 (v.41#12) pg. 118

An antenna length chart. Chart gives the length of antenna needed for various frequencies.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1986 (v.42#3) pg. 42
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1987 (v.43#1) pg. 68

How to build a shortened vertical for 20 and 30 meters. Height of the radiator is less than 10 feet. Est. cost: $50.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1986 (v.42#4) pg. 18

A loop array antenna for 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1986 (v.42#4) pg. 25

Direction-finder program for the Commodore C-64 computer. Program determines which way to point a beam-style radio antenna to get your signal into a specific location. Written in BASIC.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1986 (v.42#4) pg. 38
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1987 (v.43#1) pg. 40

Modeling radiation patterns from vertical dipoles using the "Cushcraft R3" antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1986 (v.42#4) pg. 40

Multiband antenna system utilizes the G5RV antenna design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1986 (v.42#5) pg. 68
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1986 (v.42#6) pg. 88
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1986 (v.42#7) pg. 59

How to construct four stacked TH7DX antennas on one 145-ft. self-rotating tower.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1986 (v.42#8) pg. 11

A short vertical antenna for 160 and 80 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1986 (v.42#8) pg. 32

Hints on the use of coaxial cable to feed an antenna system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1986 (v.42#8) pg. 36

Build a high-performance, extended bandwidth, shunt fed, 160 meter vertical.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1986 (v.42#12) pg. 38

Novice antenna hangups. Common problems facing new amateurs in the mystical world of antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1986 (v.42#12) pg. 44

Converting a CB antenna for 12 meter mobile use.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1986 (v.42#12) pg. 64

The "U" antenna. A high-performance DX receiver antenna for 80 and 160 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1987 (v.43#1) pg. 50

How to build a simple "J" antenna for 2 meters. Built from 1/2" copper water pipe.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1987 (v.43#2) pg. 50

More information on the extended double Zepp antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1987 (v.43#3) pg. 66

Variation on a theme by Marconi. How to construct and use an inverted-L 160 meter Marconi antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 56
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1988 (v.44#1) pg. 6

HF mini-dipole antenna uses two mobile whip antennas. Can be easily disasembled for use while traveling. Accepts either 40 or 20 meter whips.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 66

Tip on a "hybridized" G5RV dipole with a 98 ft. flattop that is better suited for a small yard.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 84

Getting started in amateur radio. Part 5. Antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1987 (v.43#6) pg. 38

More information on the G5RV antenna from the antenna's inventor, Louis Varney.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1987 (v.43#6) pg. 92

The simple, cheap all-band antenna. A 1/4-wave vertical ground antenna with clip-on extensions to cover any bands you want.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1987 (v.43#8) pg. 38

An easy-to-build all-band vertical antenna. A driven, phased array that needs no radials.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1987 (v.43#8) pg. 42

Reconfiguring a 402-BA into a 2-element 30 meter beam antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1987 (v.43#9) pg. 42

Build a high-gain portable antenna for VHF/UHF operation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1987 (v.43#10) pg. 64

New twist for the high-frequency J-pole antenna. Includes a BASIC computer program to compute the dimensions for any frequency in MHz.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1987 (v.43#11) pg. 32

How to modify a citizens-band beam antenna for use on the 10-meter novice band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1987 (v.43#11) pg. 72

Methods for building really-cheap antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1987 (v.43#11) pg. 88

The 40-meter flame thrower. A monster antenna that's guaranteed to activate your imagination.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1987 (v.43#12) pg. 36

Some thoughts on 160 meter receiving antennas for city lots.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1988 (v.44#1) pg. 26
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1988 (v.44#3) pg. 72

Designing an antenna by the seat of your pants. Tips on creative thinking and experimentation in the construction of simple wire antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1988 (v.44#3) pg. 34

Using 75 ohm CATV cable coax for amateur antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1988 (v.44#3) pg. 40

Circular polarity with linear antennas. What causes improper polarization and what you can do about it.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1988 (v.44#4) pg. 62

Long-wire antennas. Part 1. Random/long-wire antenna design and installation.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1988 (v.44#4) pg. 100

Wire antennas and trees. Use a sling shot to shoot a monofilament line through a tree, which in turn is used to help string a radio antenna wire from tree-to-tree.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1988 (v.44#5) pg. 40
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1988 (v.44#7) pg. 8

Long-wire antennas. Part 2. Length, directivity, tuning, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1988 (v.44#5) pg. 82

Tips on correct leadin wires to use with a "classic" G5RV antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1988 (v.44#6) pg. 52

Some good "hands on" suggestions to get you started with trapped vertical antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1988 (v.44#7) pg. 40

Two really cheap antenna projects suitable for use with travel trailers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1988 (v.44#8) pg. 34

Simple wooden base is used to convert a mobile mast (vertical antenna) into a portable antenna system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1988 (v.44#8) pg. 54

Portable antennas for summer fun. (1) Break-down rotary dipole. (2) Kite long-wire. (3) Roll-up coax dipole.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1988 (v.44#8) pg. 60

Problems and notes on the G5RV multiband antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1988 (v.44#10) pg. 81

Convert a rugged plastic carrying case (originally used for a soldering gun) to carry a 2-meter handheld radio and accessories. The case also incorporates a ground plane and telescoping whip antenna to improve transmit range.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1988 (v.44#11) pg. 52

A broomhandle wire-type beam antenna for 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1989 (v.45#1) pg. 28

Crazy antennas I have used. Describes a 2-meter coat hanger antenna, a 40-meter dipole taped to the ceiling, an underground antenna, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1989 (v.45#2) pg. 34

Added information on the G5RV multiband antenna popularized by Louis Varney.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1989 (v.45#2) pg. 82
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 74
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1989 (v.45#9) pg. 60
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 78

Discussion of the Extended Double Zepp (EDZ) antenna and the "Modified Windom" antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1989 (v.45#3) pg. 60
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1989 (v.45#9) pg. 61
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1989 (v.45#10) pg. 77

Hints for constructing and using kite-supported radio antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1989 (v.45#4) pg. 13

Build a 160 meter top-loaded vertical antenna suitable for an average-size city lot.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL May 1989 (v.45#5) pg. 40

Portable antenna for 24, 40, 80, and 160 meters. A collapsible 20-ft. mast supports a four-band sloper antenna system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1989 (v.45#6) pg. 22

DEZI (double extended Zepp inverted) dipole antenna for 10 meters is based on a classic 1930s antenna design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1989 (v.45#7) pg. 18

A simple wire vertical antenna for 40 meters is suspended from the branch of a tall tree.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1989 (v.45#7) pg. 30

Antennas. Part 1. A simple introduction to antennas for new amateurs and potential amateurs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1989 (v.45#7) pg. 60

Primer on the use of coaxial cable as a tuned transmission line for amateur radio antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 13

The perfect cube. An easy-to-build three-element quad antenna is built from scratch using readily available, inexpensive materials and simple tools.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 20

The search for the perfect low-band receiving antenna. A 176-ft. length of coax wire is mounted on a roof using wooden clothes pins to form a loop antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 44
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1990 (v.46#2) pg. 10

The delta loop. A classic DX antenna for 10 meters that provides excellent bandwidth and even a bit of gain.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 46

Antennas. Part 2. A simple introduction to antennas for new amateurs and potential amateurs.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1989 (v.45#8) pg. 56

Tips on HF antennas which will minimally disturb the appearance of an apartment building, condo or other structure with restrictions against amateur radio antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1989 (v.45#9) pg. 61

Tip on selection of coax cable for feeding multiband antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1989 (v.45#10) pg. 77

Cutting your losses. Replace your antenna transmission line with low-loss aluminum coaxial cable available from your local cable TV company.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 28

Antennas and digital RF communications. A look at the specifics related to various types of antennas and their applications to packet and other digital modes.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1989 (v.45#11) pg. 72

One-element rotary antennas for 28, 25, or 21 MHz are easy to build with simple tools.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1989 (v.45#12) pg. 38

Low-band vertical array. How to modify a sloping dipole to make an effective contest antenna for 80m 75, 40, and 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1989 (v.45#12) pg. 42

Sampling of wire antenna designs used in connection with a portable "suitcase station".
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1990 (v.46#2) pg. 56

Build a Yagi beam antenna from copper plumbing pipe and fittings for use in the VHF/UHF range. Est. cost: $20.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1990 (v.46#3) pg. 42

Basic antenna information. Antennas you can build and helpful hints on improving your station. Part 1. Reactance and impedance.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1990 (v.46#6) pg. 22

Basic antenna information. Part 2. Actual antenna systems.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1990 (v.46#7) pg. 24

Low-band verticals and how to feed them. Use a relatively short tower (50-to-70-ft. tall) to handle 10, 15, 20, 40, 80, and 160-meters without a lot of separate wire antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1990 (v.46#8) pg. 46

HF attic antennas. Tips on installation and adjustments.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1990 (v.46#11) pg. 66

The N4PC loop antenna. Modifying a horizontal loop antenna to produce low-angle radiation on 80 and 40 meters and still maintain excellent DX characteristics on 20 through 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1990 (v.46#12) pg. 11

The end-fed long wire antenna. A close look at a practical single-wire antenna for coverage of all bands between 160 and 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1991 (v.47#2) pg. 68

V-beam antenna, a simple and cheap wire antenna originally known as the RCA Model D antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1991 (v.47#3) pg. 98

G5RV multiband antenna, a simple sky wire.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1991 (v.47#3) pg. 98

The W4FA fast antenna. A very simple low-cost wire antenna that can be used for all-band HF operation. Can be erected quickly and will handle power outputs of from 100 to 1500 watts over the 80 to 10 meter range.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1991 (v.47#4) pg. 22

(1) Catenary double-quad loop antenna for 40 meters. (2) Multiband HF antenna and a matching box for changing between 80 meters and the HF bands. (3) Half-length sloper for 80, 40, 30, and 20 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1991 (v.47#7) pg. 60

Obtaining noninductive power resistors for the T2FD (terminated tilted folded dipole) antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1991 (v.47#8) pg. 62

Let's talk antennas. How to tell a good antenna system from a bad one. Part 1. Basic criteria governing all antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1991 (v.47#9) pg. 40

Let's talk antennas. Part 2. Multiband beams and wire antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1991 (v.47#10) pg. 36

Let's talk antennas. Part 3. Rotatable dipole, inverted-vee antenna, grounding, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1991 (v.47#11) pg. 44

A 50 ohm quad loop antenna. Dimensions for 10, 12, 15, and 20 meter band.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1991 (v.47#11) pg. 56

Ham radio safety tips for antenna installation and electric power.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1991 (v.47#12) pg. 90

Basic plan for the extended Lazy H antenna. Produces four lobes on 17 meters and can be used on the other bands (80, 40, 30, 20, 15, 12 and 10 meters) as well.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1992 (v.48#4) pg. 11

The irrigator's special. Construct a free-standing, collapsible vertical antenna from PVC pipe and wire which does not require a tuner. Operates on 20, 30, or 40 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1992 (v.48#4) pg. 38

The McCoy dipole antenna which can be many lengths.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1992 (v.48#6) pg. 11

How to take the guesswork out of building a helically wound HF vertical antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1992 (v.48#8) pg. 52

Constructing and erecting a vertical zigzag wire broadband antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1992 (v.48#8) pg. 58

A two-band (12 and 17 meter) half-square wire antenna with coaxial feed.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1992 (v.48#9) pg. 40

The G5RV antenna. Results of experiments in using and improving this sky wire design.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1992 (v.48#11) pg. 74
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1993 (v.49#4) pg. 85

Build a single-wire off-center-fed Windom multiband dipole antenna. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1992 (v.48#12) pg. 106

Build a single-wire off-center-fed Windom multiband dipole antenna. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1993 (v.49#1) pg. 64

Multiband wire antennas. (1) 7 and 21 MHz dipole. (2) Trap-dipole configuration.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1993 (v.49#2) pg. 98

Buying an antenna. A primer to help select one which satisfies the needs of the amateur radio operator.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1993 (v.49#4) pg. 24
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1993 (v.49#7) pg. 4

Yagis versus quads, log periodics, and others. A comparison of rotary directional antennas. Part 1.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1993 (v.49#11) pg. 40

Yagis versus quads, log periodics, and others. A comparison of rotary directional antennas. Part 2.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1993 (v.49#12) pg. 56

A lightweight 2-element Yagi antenna for 18 MHz (17 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1994 (v.50#1) pg. 48
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1994 (v.50#6) pg. 65

Some answers to common antenna questions. (1) The "best" feed line. (2) Baluns. (3) Top band antennas. (4) Physically shortened antennas. (5) Ground radials.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1994 (v.50#3) pg. 96

Ground-plane loop antenna features capacitive feed, inductive feed or gamma feed. Can be tuned to cover a 2-to-1 frequency range.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1994 (v.50#4) pg. 90

Classic antennas for classic rigs. (1) All-band Gotham vertical. It works similar to an oversize mobile antenna, so any large self-wound and tapped coil can be used. (2) El-Toro open-wire antenna uses a "ladder-line" radiator that can be installed vertically, sloping, or bent to fit available space.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1994 (v.50#6) pg. 91

A compact, four-band (40, 20, 15, 10 meter) quad array.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1994 (v.50#7) pg. 22
Correction CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1994 (v.50#10) pg. 151

An off-center-fed dipole antenna. A simple half-wave dipole antenna can be modified into a 4-band antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1994 (v.50#9) pg. 44

An analysis of the basic log-periodic dipole array (LPDA). Includes dimensions for a small LPDA antenna for 18-28 MHz built on a 12-ft. boom.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1994 (v.50#10) pg. 84

The N4PC Bi-Delta antenna is easy to build, is efficient, uses wire, and covers three bands (20, 30, 40 meters).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1994 (v.50#11) pg. 42

Assembly outline of full-wave Delta Loop antenna which can be made for any band from 160 to 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1994 (v.50#11) pg. 107

Acid rain and your antenna. How to reduce the "wet antenna syndrome" which causes a change in the tuner settings of wire antennas. How to perform an analysis of rain water and make a "raincoat" for end insulators from 2-liter plastic bottles.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1995 (v.51#2) pg. 13

An open-sleeve dipole antenna for 10, 18, and 24 MHz
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1995 (v.51#2) pg. 94

Five-band antenna farm for a small lot handles 7, 14 and 21 MHz, 10 meter and 80 meter.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1995 (v.51#2) pg. 94

The Lazy H antenna. Construct an antenna which consists of two dipoles in a properly phased array. Handles all bands from 40 through 10 meters.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1995 (v.51#3) pg. 36

Oversize slingshot (for erecting treetop wire antennas) is attached to a stepladder.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1995 (v.51#4) pg. 30

A DX antenna for 160, 80, 40, and 30 meters consists of a 45-ft. vertical radiator, special trap, 70-ft. straight wire top, and a ground system of sixteen 80-ft. radials buried in the ground.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1995 (v.51#4) pg. 36

How to build three omnidirectional antennas for 440 MHz from PVC pipe and 300 ohm twin-lead. (1) J-pole. (2) Two-element end-fed collinear. (3) Four-element collinear.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1995 (v.51#7) pg. 36

A simple multiband antenna array for 7, 10, 14, 18, and 21 MHz is based on the Lazy-V dipole.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1995 (v.51#8) pg. 72

Construct the H double-bay wire antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Sep 1995 (v.51#9) pg. 28

How to add a rotatable 17- and 12-meter trap dipole to your antenna farm. Est. cost: $100.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1996 (v.52#2) pg. 28

Summertime antenna installation. Safety ideas to help alleviate or eliminate some of the dangers of working on antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1996 (v.52#7) pg. 40

Basics of the Zepp (Zepplin) antenna and tips on building one.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1996 (v.52#10) pg. 30

The WEETENNA. An electrically shortened multi-band dipole antenna to fit whatever space is available.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1996 (v.52#11) pg. 9

A "poor man's" method for simple antenna pattern measurements.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Nov 1996 (v.52#11) pg. 58

Quad versus Yagi. Observations and notes comparing the pros and cons of these two antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1997 (v.53#1) pg. 62

The full-wave loop sky-wire antenna. Specifications given for constructing a 3.5-28 MHz loop and a 7-28 MHz loop.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1997 (v.53#2) pg. 11

Antenna efficiency. Tips on improving the ratio of power input to power output in your antenna system.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1997 (v.53#2) pg. 18

Tips on stringing antenna wire in, over, and around treetops using bow-and-arrow, slingshot, kite, etc.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Feb 1997 (v.53#2) pg. 28

Tip on converting an all-metal attic ridge vent into an invisible center-fed antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1997 (v.53#4) pg. 55

Narrowing the debate. A brief look at replication requirements for building Yagi and Quad antennas.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Aug 1997 (v.53#8) pg. 40

How to build a super slinky stealth antenna. Transforming wire-reinforced flexible clothes dryer venting and 2 metal trash can covers into a concealed attic antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Dec 1997 (v.53#12) pg. 22

The J-pole antenna. A roll-it-up, stuff-it-in-your-pocket, portable alternative to the rubber ducky antenna found on handheld transceivers.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jan 1998 (v.54#1) pg. 32

QRP antenna cheapware. Small QRP antenna is built from a plastic 35mm film container, button, wire, capacitor, and inductor. Other uses for 35mm film containers include a low-power balun, dipole antenna center support, and open wire spreaders.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1998 (v.54#3) pg. 30
Added Info CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1998 (v.54#6) pg. 8

The J-pole revisited. Design and construction parameters. How computer tweaking can make it more efficient.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Mar 1998 (v.54#3) pg. 34

Another look at the G5RV antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1998 (v.54#4) pg. 18

A five-band (20, 17, 15, 12, 10 meters) cubical quad for Cycle 23. Uses a simple feed system, avoids use of complicated matching networks, can be constructed by one person, and does not require continued maintenance.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jun 1998 (v.54#6) pg. 11

How to build an effective all-band counterpoise (ground grid) for a vertical antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1998 (v.54#7) pg. 20

A closer look at the extended double Zepp antenna. Designing an affordable, available-space antenna.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Jul 1998 (v.54#7) pg. 28

Trap dipoles for dummies. The secrets of trap dipole antenna design revealed in plain language.
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Oct 1998 (v.54#10) pg. 32

Some practical ideas about stacking HF yagi antennas. Topics covered include wave angle control, antenna spacing, feedlines, etc.
DX MAGAZINE Jan 1990 (v.2#1) pg. 12

Phased quarter-wave sloper (PQWS) makes a good DX antenna.
DX MAGAZINE Apr 1990 (v.2#4) pg. 23

Practical application of YAGINEC. A computer modeling program helps explain why some single-band yagi's function better than others. Looks at 3, 4, 5 and 6-element designs.
DX MAGAZINE Nov 1990 (v.2#11) pg. 6

Phasing antennas. How to combine two of almost any type of amateur radio antenna.
DX MAGAZINE Jun 1991 (v.3#6) pg. 13

Is horizontal polarization always the best? The results of using "MiniNEC" computer software to compare vertically polarized antennas with horizontal ones.
DX MAGAZINE May-Jun 1993 (v.5#3) pg. 19

Determining the correct height for horizontally polarized antennas using computer modeling.
DX MAGAZINE Jul-Aug 1993 (v.5#4) pg. 30
Added Info DX MAGAZINE Sep-Oct 1993 (v.5#5) pg. 33
Added Info DX MAGAZINE Nov-Dec 1993 (v.5#6) pg. 60

Low-band tri-bander. A very simple vertically polarized antenna system for 40-160 meters that is limited to the space confines of the tower and HF yagi, yet produces good results on the low bands. Built from readily available materials.
DX MAGAZINE Jan-Feb 1994 (v.6#1) pg. 9

In search of the ultimate antenna. Selecting, assembling and fine-tuning a multi-band antenna. Part 1. The selection process.
DX MAGAZINE Mar-Apr 1994 (v.6#2) pg. 19

In search of the ultimate antenna. Part 2. Assembly, erection, and initial testing.
DX MAGAZINE May-Jun 1994 (v.6#3) pg. 12

In search of the ultimate antenna. Part 3. Final tuning to improve resonate points and SWR curves.
DX MAGAZINE Jul-Aug 1994 (v.6#4) pg. 38

Compact-loop antennas. Some practical advice on building and tuning.
DX MAGAZINE Nov-Dec 1994 (v.6#6) pg. 22

Build an active shortwave antenna (consisting of a very short antenna and a high-gain amplifier) to use in place of a long-wire receiving antenna. Est. cost: $15 (kit).
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1990 pg. 87, 125

Choosing the right shortwave receiving antenna.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1991 pg. 77

Low-cost and effective window-mount vertical antenna (helix antenna) is made from insulated hook-up wire and PVC pipe.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1996 pg. 73

Inverted V antenna is a modified version of the half-wave dipole.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1996 pg. 74

AM/FM/SW active antenna includes a FET amplifier to boost the signal with almost no load felt by the antenna.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1990 pg. 132

Wire beams. How to design and construct a wire antenna. Looks at half-wavelength dipole, Yagi beam, double-extended Zepp, Collinear Franklin array, Lazy-H, and ZL-Special antennas.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1993 pg. 66

A quick and dirty quad antenna for CB or 10- and 12-meter ham bands. Requires no ground plane, puts out twice the signal, and is directional. Est. cost: $15.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK 1993 pg. 98

AA-7 active antenna is used to amplify the signals from 3 to 3000 MHz, which includes shortwave, ham, government, and commercial radio signals. Est. cost: $25.
ELECTRONICS HOBBYISTS HANDBOOK Spring 1994 pg. 72

Fine wire antenna.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1963 (v.6#1) pg. 95

What SWR means to you.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1963 (v.6#4) pg. 61

Choosing the right transmisson line.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1963 (v.6#5) pg. 45

Ham antenna facts.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1963 (v.6#5) pg. 72

Simple mainmast for 80-, 40- and 15-meters.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1963 (v.6#5) pg. 90

Antenna analyzer meter helps tune antenna.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1964 (v.7#1) pg. 47

Spark plug lightning arrester for an antenna.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1964 (v.7#3) pg. 34

Two antennas can be better than one.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1964 (v.7#4) pg. 96

All-band SWL antenna.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1964 (v.7#5) pg. 99

Attic antenna for shortwave receiver acts as a signal building half-wave dipole or conventional long-wire antenna at the flip of a switch. Constructed of 300-ohm TV twin lead.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1966 (v.9#5) pg. 76

A mini verical for SWL's. An 8-ft. vertical antenna that can be made resonant on any frequency in the shortwave bands. A tuning unit electrically makes the antenna 1/4 wavelength long at any shortwave frequency.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1967 (v.10#5) pg. 92

Quarter-wave ground plane antenna for 6- and 2-meter ham bands.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1968 (v.11#1) pg. 106

Multi-dipole SWL antenna covers all shortwave bands from 6- to 80-meters.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1968 (v.11#5) pg. 87

Three-element beam antenna for 10 meters. Est. cost: $10.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1969 (v.12#1) pg. 95

Inverted-V antenna for 15-, 40- and 80-meter ham bands. Antennas are a half-wavelength long.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Mar 1969 (v.12#2) pg. 92

Vee-Quad antenna designs for 20-, 15- and 10-meters or citizens band.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1969 (v.12#5) pg. 56

Four-band ham antenna tunes 80-, 40-, 20-, and 10-meters. Low cost antenna uses only 140 feet of copper wire and TV twin lead.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1970 (v.13#1) pg. 43

A 6- and 2-meter ham antenna built of wood dowels, aluminum tubing and wire. Est. cost: $3.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED May 1970 (v.13#3) pg. 67

Remotely-tuned SWL and ham antenna.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jul 1970 (v.13#4) pg. 82

Three-element ham yagi antenna with total tuning for the 20, 15 and 10 meters plus citizens band.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1970 (v.13#5) pg. 90

Vertical general-purpose antenna for 10-, 15-, and 20-meter bands and CB. Approximately 11-ft. tall.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1970 (v.13#6) pg. 47

Five-band ham antenna with remote coil switching covers 10-, 15-, 20-, 40-, or 80-meter bands.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Sep 1971 (v.14#5) pg. 92

A 2-meter five-element beam antenna. Est. cost: $2.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Nov 1971 (v.14#6) pg. 92

A trap antenna for SWLs operates from 3 to 30 mc with an impedance of nearly 50 ohms throughout this range.
ELECTRONICS ILLUSTRATED Jan 1972 (v.15#1) pg. 63

Sloping-vee antenna for shortwave receiver or ham rig will improve transmission and reception at low cost.
ELECTRONICS NOW Sep 1992 (v.63#9) pg. 71

The J-pole antenna. Build this simple, portable 3/4-meter band (440 to 450 MHz) antenna.
ELECTRONICS NOW Feb 1993 (v.64#2) pg. 71

Tunable shortwave antenna to improve reception.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jul 1994 (v.65#7) pg. 60

UHF corner-reflector antenna. Obtain outstanding performance from a home-brew radiator built from readily-available parts and materials.
ELECTRONICS NOW Jul 1996 (v.67#7) pg. 57

Connect a dipole antenna to an end-feed antenna receiver or to a receiver with only one antenna terminal and one ground terminal. Diagram included.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS #763 Winter 1965 pg. 17

Rotatable broadcast band loop antenna is useful when DXing the BC band.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1973 (v.13#6) pg. 51

Antenna systems for SWLs. Several styles of shortwave antennas plus a simple SWL antenna tuner.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Mar-Apr 1975 (v.15#2) pg. 43

How to install a trap vertical antenna. It is an "all band" hf antenna with enough room for 160, 80, 40 meters, 80 through 10 meters, or 40 through 10 meters, or full novice coverage starting at 80 meters. Est. cost: $80.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1975 (v.15#6) pg. 60

Three simple antenna installations for those just getting into the shortwave listening hobby (SWL).
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1976 (v.16#1) pg. 63

Convert a child's "Slinky" toy, a tin can and a fishing reel into a shortwave end-fed helically-wound long-wire antenna. The antenna hangs out a window and may be cranked up and stored when not needed. Est. cost: $10.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1976 (v.16#3) pg. 52

Multiband SWL antenna system built from 300-ohm TV twin lead and some coax cable. Covers 8 bands (49, 41, 31, 25, 19, 16, 13, and 11 meters). Est. cost: $20.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1976 (v.16#4) pg. 63

A discussion of long-wire antennas and vertical antennas for the novice ham.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1978 (v.18#6) pg. 57

Getting your "BNEE". Third semester. How to match your new novice transmitter to your antenna and get your station on the air.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1979 (v.19#1) pg. 65

Elementary Electronics basic course in electricity & electronics. Understanding dipoles.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jul-Aug 1979 (v.19#4) pg. 77

Directional antennas for the shortwave listener. What is available commercially and what can be built.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1980 (v.20#6) pg. 71

BASIC computer program to aid in the alignment of a radio or television antenna using the geographic coordinates of the antenna and the transmission tower.
ELEMENTARY ELECTRONICS Jan-Feb 1981 (v.21#1) pg. 46

Tips on constructing dipole antennas for all radio bands 6 through 160 meters. Includes mast construction which uses plastic plumbing pipe.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Summer 1984 (v.2#1) pg. 56

Add a directional loop antenna to your CB or ham rig. Use it to locate a source of interference or to locate the position of a transmitter.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Fall 1984 (v.2#2) pg. 50

Design tips for 15/40 dipole antennas which feature PVC piping mount structure.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Fall 1984 (v.2#2) pg. 70

Three-section PVC mast and inverted long-wire antenna for 20 meters.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Winter 1985 (v.2#3) pg. 86

All you need to know about erecting a back-yard helical 40-meter vertical antenna.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Spring 1985 (v.2#4) pg. 95

Fabricate a multi-band (10-, 15- and 20-meter) umbrella dipole antenna.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Summer 1985 (v.2#5) pg. 93

Flexo SWL Aerial. An antenna/antenna-switching system than improves shortwave reception by adding flexibility to a single-antenna system, making it seem as if you have more than one antenna. Gives you more choices in antenna length, angle-of-signal arrival, and propagation conditions.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS May-Jun 1986 (v.3#3) pg. 65

Specifications for fabricating shortened HF dipole antennas.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jan 1987 (v.4#1) pg. 106

Phasing vertical antennas. How the user of an omnidirectional vertical antenna can get the benefit of directivity.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Feb 1987 (v.4#2) pg. 97

If the antenna doesn't fit, use a limited-space design. A look at verticals, scrunched dipoles, long- and short-wire antennas, and a directional limited-space antenna.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Apr 1987 (v.4#4) pg. 86

Indoor aluminum foil antennas for FM, TV, and shortwave.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jun 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 66

Installing store-bought trap verticals. Some tips.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Aug 1987 (v.4#8) pg. 86

Active antenna for better DX'ing. Build an active loop antenna to dramatically improve reception on longwave, broadcast and amateur-shortwave bands. Est. cost: $69.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Oct 1987 (v.4#10) pg. 75

Make long-wire antennas really work using some old techniques.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jul 1988 (v.5#7) pg. 92

Resurrecting the old fashioned dipole antenna as a low-cost alternative to a tri-band beam.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Aug 1988 (v.5#8) pg. 90

Five classic antennas for radio listening setups. Looks at the random-length antenna, half-wave dipole, quarter-wave vertical, loop antennas and active antennas.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Sep 1988 (v.5#9) pg. 41
Correction HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov 1988 (v.5#11) pg. 4

Multi-band wire antennas. Looks at trap dipoles, tuned-feeder, the G5RV multi-band dipole, and parallel transmission line.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Sep 1988 (v.5#9) pg. 92

Antennas for getting on the 10-meter band. (1) Adapt a CB ground-plane antenna. (2) Build a rotatable dipole from aluminum pipe.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Dec 1988 (v.5#12) pg. 90

How to build your own dipole antenna for any international broadcaster, ham, CB or other frequency. Wire lengths for 11, 13, 16, 19, 25, 31, 41, 49 and 60-meter bands are given.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1978 (v.1#1) pg. 71

Basic introduction to antennas, how to determine the length of an antenna and typical hookups for dipole, inverted-L, slant long-wire and vertical long-wire antennas.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1978 (v.1#4) pg. 78

UHF corner reflector antenna. Dimensions given for constructing 6 different antennas for handling the 3 amateur and 3 commercial bands in the range 420-1300 MHz.
POPTRONIX EXPERIMENTER HANDBOOK Summer 1997 pg. 95

80-160 duo-bander operates as a quarter-wave end-fed antenna. A 5-ft. mast driven into the earth serves as a simple ground system.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1989 (v.7#5) pg. 46

Tips on replacing the little rubber antennas on handheld 2-way radios with a telescopic whip or an external antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Feb 1989 (v.7#6) pg. 48

Ground-level fed long wires for SWB listening.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Feb 1989 (v.7#6) pg. 68

DX'ing the high-frequency SWB bands using indoor antennas. Single-wire indoor antennas for 11, 13, 16, 19, 21, 25, and 31 meter bands.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 50

Modify a 4-ft. helical loaded mobile CB antenna to operate between 33.90 and 162.55 MHz.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1989 (v.7#7) pg. 51

More about indoor wire antennas for MW/LW and SW tuners. Tips on using metal framed windows and doors as antennas.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS May 1989 (v.7#9) pg. 36

Indoor full-wave quad loop antenna installation ideas.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jul 1989 (v.7#11) pg. 38

Simple antennas for the daytime DX bands. Both indoor and outdoor designs shown.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Aug 1989 (v.7#12) pg. 56

WARC dipole antenna and multiband (10-15-20-40-80 meter) short dipole antenna both use resonator coils.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Oct 1989 (v.8#2) pg. 48

Tips on using a wideband pre-amplifier to improve LW, MV and SWL reception with an indoor antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Nov 1989 (v.8#3) pg. 44

Adapting the Grove ANT-6 indoor antenna for both scanner and SWL use.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Dec 1989 (v.8#4) pg. 46

EPI (Electronic Processing, Inc.) wideband active antenna. A user test of this indoor antenna includes techniques for improving reception of the SWB bands by adding some wire to the top of the antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1990 (v.8#7) pg. 39

Tip on fabricating an 80-ft. indoor horizontal loop antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1990 (v.8#7) pg. 42

Harmonics and the single-wire antenna. Making and using single wire antennas for the various SWB and ham bands.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Apr 1990 (v.8#8) pg. 39

World band broadcast listening with a portable. Part 2. Tuning tips and antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Nov 1990 (v.9#3) pg. 38

Make an indoor radio receiver dipole antenna from standard phono-cable with a phono-plug attached at one end.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1991 (v.9#5) pg. 38

String up a hot broadcast band antenna. (1) Long-wire antenna using a coil feedline near the receiver. (2) Beverage wave antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1991 (v.9#7) pg. 24

Build a DF antenna, a simple receiving antenna with directionality for HF. Use it to null out local interference.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Dec 1991 (v.10#4) pg. 32

Build the TCFTFD dipole (tilted, center-fed, terminated, folded dipole), a high frequency antenna for shortwave listening.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jul 1992 (v.10#11) pg. 48

Construct a single-turn, low-inductance wide loop antenna to improve reception on small portable shortwave receivers equipped with telescoping whip antennas.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1993 (v.11#7) pg. 42

Indoor SWL antennas for cave dwellers (residents of apartments, condos and townhouses). (1) Antenna in attic or loft. (2) Flagpole antenna. (3) Fishing pole antenna. (4) Flowerpot antenna.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS May 1993 (v.11#9) pg. 53

Build the double extended Zepp antenna (a version of the collinear wire antenna) for ham and SWL use.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jul 1994 (v.12#11) pg. 60

Overcoming SWL "fade" by using diversity reception techniques. An introduction to spatial diversity and polarity diversity antenna systems.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Nov 1994 (v.13#3) pg. 66

Build the room or attic loop shortwave (high-frequency) all-band receiver antenna. A possible solution for apartment and townhouse dwellers.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1995 (v.13#5) pg. 34

Antenna "radials". What are they and how many do you need?
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1995 (v.13#7) pg. 74

Inverted-L antennas for small lots.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS May 1995 (v.13#9) pg. 78

Long-wire antennas. Part 1. A description of the classic, non-resonant long-wire antenna and its radiation pattern.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Sep 1995 (v.14#1) pg. 50

Long-wire antennas. Part 2. V-beam and inverted V-beam.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Nov 1995 (v.14#3) pg. 48

Shortwave receiving antenna measurements. Making sense out of a difficult topic.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1996 (v.14#5) pg. 29

Rhombic antenna for ham radio. How it works, transmission lines, tuner matching, etc.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Jan 1996 (v.14#5) pg. 72

Layout and dimensions for constructing a pair of "Six-Shooter" ham radio antennas.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Mar 1996 (v.14#7) pg. 36

The low-band "Tee-Tenna" is made from 300-ohm twin lead and is related more to the Marconi style than the Hertzian (or dipole). Dimensions are given for 7200, 4750, 5500, 6500, 3750, 1850, and 1000 kHz.
POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS Nov 1996 (v.15#3) pg. 30

Making one dipole antenna work on two bands.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1964 (v.20#2) pg. 75

Two halo antennas stacked for 2 meters. Mobile or fixed station.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1965 (v.22#1) pg. 65

Two compact BCB PX antennas include a "loaded" whip antenna and a variable-tuned loop antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1965 (v.22#1) pg. 75

The essential dimensions of the all-metal, 15-meter "Swiss Quad" directional antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1965 (v.22#4) pg. 74

Build a 144-mc Swiss Quad antenna; all metal, 2-meter, cubical quad.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1965 (v.23#1) pg. 52

Using TV input balun coils to put a low power 6- or 2-meter ham transceiver on the air using only an outdoor TV antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1966 (v.25#2) pg. 88

Build an 80/40 meter bandswitching vertical antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1966 (v.25#4) pg. 73

Build a "J" style antenna in 30 minutes. Useful for 6- or 2-meters and SWL between 150 and 170 MHz.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1966 (v.25#6) pg. 46

Simple 40-meter vertical monopole antenna tunes either ham or SWL 41-meter DX bands. Lightweight antenna constructed of 300-ohm twin-lead cable. Can be mounted on an existing tower or on your house. Est. cost: $1.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1967 (v.27#5) pg. 82

Portable antenna tunes 40-, 80- and 20-meters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1968 (v.28#3) pg. 76

Switch for selecting one of three antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1968 (v.28#4) pg. 77

Five antenna designs for novices, technicians and SWL's.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] May 1968 (v.28#5) pg. 59

Four-band SWL antenna. Resonant dipoles for 60-, 41-, 19- and 13-meter bands.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1968 (v.29#5) pg. 50

Broadband dipole antenna for 75/80 meters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1969 (v.30#1) pg. 66

Simple Wheatstone bridge and a signal source used to tune SWL antenna system.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1969 (v.30#4) pg. 66

Lightning protection for a ham radio antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1970 (v.33#1) pg. 61

Multi-band ham antenna takes up little space. Consists of up to 4 "Hustler" antennas mounted on a single mast. Covers 10-, 15-, 20-, 40-, and/or 80-meters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1970 (v.33#2) pg. 27

Seventy foot antenna covers the 80- through 10-meter ham bands. Multi-dipole antenna has low SWR and uses no traps.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1973 (v.3#4) pg. 56

Antennas for CB'ers and hams. Part 1. Clearing away half truths and superstitions.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1973 (v.4#3) pg. 95

Antennas for CB'ers and hams. Part 2. Some unusual antenna configurations are discussed.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1973 (v.4#4) pg. 51

Vertical helix antenna disguised as a flag pole produces good results.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1974 (v.5#1) pg. 98

Indoor 20-meter ham antenna is only a 6-ft. long coil of wire.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1974 (v.6#4) pg. 52

How to build a compact 80/40-meter inverted V antenna. Only 10 feet longer than a conventional dipole, but gives good two band coverage.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Oct 1975 (v.8#4) pg. 98

How to properly ground a ham radio antenna and equipment to prevent damage from lightning strikes.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1976 (v.10#2) pg. 86

A review of various configurations for the one-wavelength loop antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Apr 1977 (v.11#4) pg. 88

The antenna, getting out the signal. Tips on selecting, matching, and coupling the ham antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1978 (v.14#3) pg. 111

How to determine antenna gain.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1979 (v.16#1) pg. 43

Tailor a standard TV antenna to provide excellent reception on the vhf/uhf public safety bands.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1979 (v.16#2) pg. 44

Tip on installing a wave trap to filter out unwanted AM radio signals.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1981 (v.19#2) pg. 87

A multiband shortwave antenna for SWLs. Transmission-line traps of novel construction allow this antenna to resonate on the 49-,31-, 25-, 19-, 16-, 13- and 11-meter shortwave bands. Est. cost: $30.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1981 (v.19#6) pg. 53

An introduction to the meaning of "long-wire antennas" and "antenna gain" as used in amateur radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1989 (v.6#4) pg. 86

The Cliff Dwellers SWL (shortwave listening) antenna. Helically wound antenna is made by combining 5-conductor cable with a 7-ft. piece of PVC plastic pipe. Capable of pulling in signals between 150 kHz and 30 MHz.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1989 (v.6#5) pg. 42

AM/FM/SW active antenna. A one-evening project that will pull in shortwave or AM broadcasts like a magnet. Combines an 18" whip antenna with an FET amplifier to boost the signal.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1989 (v.6#7) pg. 73

Antenna measurements for hams and SWL's. How to test and tune your antenna without using a transmitter.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 70

Getting on 17 meters. How to construct and install a 17-meter band antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1989 (v.6#10) pg. 94

Keeping your ham radio antenna system in shape. Tips on troubleshooting, grounding, tower safety, etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1990 (v.7#5) pg. 88

Where does my signal go? Understanding antenna-radiation patterns for the basic half-wave-length dipole antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1990 (v.7#7) pg. 86

How to install a ham or SWL antenna (or antenna mast). Tips on safety, antenna location, materials, supports, etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1990 (v.7#9) pg. 42

A homebrew antenna for the cheapskate. A vertical antenna is assembled from aluminum tubing, wood, wire and rope.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1991 (v.8#2) pg. 86

Wire antennas for hams and SWL's. (1) Tee. (2) Random-length long-wire. (3) Doublet. (4) Windom. (5) Shortened dipole.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1991 (v.8#8) pg. 49

Improve lower frequency radio reception with a dual-band, loop-style, amplified-antenna system.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1991 (v.8#12) pg. 62

Folded dipole antennas for ham radio. Two construction methods shown along with an alternate method of feeding the folded dipole.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1992 (v.9#1) pg. 87

Design and build loaded dipole antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1992 (v.9#3) pg. 80

Listing for a BASIC computer program to compute the Great Circle bearing and distance between any two points on Earth. It is used mainly for positioning radio antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1992 (v.9#4) pg. 76

Wire beam antennas for ham radio. Advice on installing and using the half-wavelength dipole, Yagi, double-extended Zepp, collinear Franklin array, Lazy-H, and ZL Special antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1992 (v.9#5) pg. 45
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1992 (v.9#10) pg. 3

Loopstick antennas, their construction and use.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1992 (v.9#6) pg. 74

Two configurations for terminating long-wire antennas are compared. (1) Traditional ground connection. (2) Radials replacing ground connection.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1992 (v.9#8) pg. 80

Build an active antenna for a radio receiver or scanner. Amplify from 3 to 3000 MHz which includes shortwave, ham, government, and commercial radio signals. Est. cost: $25 (kit).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1993 (v.10#3) pg. 46

Loading up a tower. How to utilize a metal antenna tower as a random length, vertically polarized, Marconi antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1993 (v.10#5) pg. 78

Pipe and tubing antennas. Basic methods used to process aluminum tubing and copper pipes into functioning antenna systems.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1993 (v.10#11) pg. 44

Wire antennas for ham radio. (1) Thorne array. An upside-down bobtail curtain antenna that is capable of a very low angle of radiation. (2) Large Loop or Bi-Square antenna which is similar to a single-element quad.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1994 (v.11#6) pg. 84

An all-band delta-loop antenna. Includes a band-changing and matching network.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1994 (v.11#8) pg. 86

Making and using the DDRR (Directional Discontinuity Ring Radiator) antenna. An adequate performer when space considerations prevent building a larger antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Dec 1994 (v.11#12) pg. 80

A DX beam-aimer (antenna aiming) program. A BASIC language computer program that calculates the true direction and true nautical distance between two points on the face of the globe.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1995 (v.12#1) pg. 40
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1995 (v.12#4) pg. 4
Added Info POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 4

Some antenna topics. (1) Making the G5RV multiband ham radio antenna. (2) Antenna reciprocity. (3) Receive vs. transmit antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1995 (v.12#3) pg. 78

Antenna safety for hams and SWL's. Looks at antenna construction, tower safety, lightning protection, grounding, etc.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1995 (v.12#5) pg. 37

Limited-space antennas for SWL's. Designs and ideas to help even the most space-challenged shortwave listener.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1995 (v.12#6) pg. 61

Antenna installation safety tips.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1996 (v.13#1) pg. 72

Low-frequency antenna ideas. (1) Coaxial-tee antenna. (2) Twin-lead tee antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1996 (v.13#6) pg. 72

Twin-lead antennas for amateur radio. (1) Marconi antenna. (2) Folded dipole. (3) Wideband folded dipole. (4) Dipole beam.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1996 (v.13#8) pg. 56

A Sterba curtain array antenna. This exotic is easy to build and suitable for upper HF (above 10 MHz) or lower VHF regions. Other antenna topics examined include antenna gain, coaxial choke, end-fire arrays, broadside arrays, voltage standing-wave ratio (VSWR), and impedance matching.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Sep 1996 (v.13#9) pg. 63

Constructing the basic folded dipole antenna for ham radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1996 (v.13#10) pg. 74

Build a 5/8-wavelength ground-plane (vertical) antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1997 (v.14#1) pg. 62

Construction details for hanging loop antennas.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1997 (v.14#7) pg. 71

Build a 100-kHz to 30-MHz active antenna. Est. cost: $20 (kit) plus PVC pipe fittings.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1997 (v.14#8) pg. 48

Large loop antennas for ham radio. Dimensions given for eight quad loops. Installation of loops and the delta loop antenna are also discussed.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1997 (v.14#10) pg. 62

Antenna scaling. A method for converting antenna dimensions and element spacing from one frequency to another.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1997 (v.14#11) pg. 70

The Beverage (or wave) antenna. Constructing one of the best receive antennas available for Very Low Frequency (VLF), AM broadcast band (BCB), medium wave (MW) or Tropical Band (low HF region).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1998 (v.15#1) pg. 40

Vertical antenna designs from the perspective of their ground systems and standing wave ratio (SWR).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1998 (v.15#1) pg. 62

Recording the VSWR (voltage standing wave ratio), feed point impedance, and other measurements of ham radio antennas and transmission lines. This will help when troubleshooting.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1998 (v.15#2) pg. 69

Some odd loop antennas for ham radio. (1) Ring antenna. (2) DDRR (Directional Discontinuity Ring Radiator). (3) Commercial loop.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1998 (v.15#3) pg. 60

How to erect and use a simple dipole antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1998 (v.15#4) pg. 58

Quad loop antenna for ham radio. Introduction to a square loop that can be fed on either a horizontal edge (horizontal polarization) or vertical edge (vertical polarization).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] May 1998 (v.15#5) pg. 49

Design and use of end-fed Zepp antennas for ham radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1998 (v.15#6) pg. 52

Construction and use of the G5RV antenna for ham radio.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1998 (v.15#7) pg. 45

The random-length wire Vee antenna. Basic layout and modeling results for a 100-ft end-fed Vee antenna.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1999 (v.16#1) pg. 62

Helical antennas and their application in "RadioScience Observing" (including whistlers, spherics, and radio astronomy).
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1999 (v.16#6) pg. 15

Home-built antenna selector allows shortwave reception on a small transistor portable radio. Also has connection for recorder to allow taping of broadcasts or feeding through an external speaker.
POPULAR MECHANICS Nov 1969 (v.132#5) pg. 154

A short course in antennas for shortwave listening. Includes a chart of the radio listening spectrum and an examination of various types of antennas.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1973 (v.139#2) pg. 124

How to restore your old antenna (ham, CB or TV) to like-new operation.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1979 (v.151#6) pg. 104

Tip: Easy way to make a half-wavelength dipole shortwave antenna.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1980 (v.153#3) pg. 84

Tips on erecting the Hygain Electronics 50-foot HG-50 MT2 antenna tower and a TH5-DX beam antenna.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1981 (v.155#2) pg. 28

An indoor shortwave antenna system for use with an all-wave radio receiver.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1968 (v.192#6) pg. 107

How two or more radios can share the same antenna.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1980 (v.51#10) pg. 116
Correction RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1980 (v.51#11) pg. 24

Deciphering antenna specifications.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1982 (v.53#8) pg. 72

Design theory for a multi-band trap-antenna for 10, 15, and 20-meters.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1983 (v.54#2) pg. 98

Antenna systems. An explanation of VHF antenna phasing networks.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1984 (v.55#10) pg. 98
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS May 1985 (v.56#5) pg. 26

Antique radios. Antennas and grounds.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1985 (v.56#9) pg. 102

Active antenna for shortwave listening that provides between 14- and 20-dB gain over the range of 1-30 MHz. Est. cost: $15.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1989 (v.60#2) pg. 51, 110
Correction RADIO-ELECTRONICS Apr 1989 (v.60#4) pg. 93
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jun 1989 (v.60#6) pg. 14

Choosing the right shortwave-listener (SWL) antenna. Looks at making and installing simple long-wire antennas as well as commercial choices.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jul 1989 (v.60#7) pg. 61

Low-cost, three-band antenna that will fit the average backyard. Designed for 80-, 40- and 15-meters. Measures 100 ft. long.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Feb-Mar 1967 (v.22#1) pg. 72

Zippy signal grabber. Use house electrical wiring as a giant antenna to receive any signal, from broadcast band through TV.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Aug-Sep 1967 (v.23#1) pg. 74

A dual purpose dipole antenna can be used for either the 80-meter or 40-meter band, with an antenna that occupies only slightly more space than a 40-meter antenna.
RADIO-TV EXPERIMENTER Jun-Jul 1968 (v.24#3) pg. 77

Simple, low-cost way to put up a single-band ham antenna.
SCIENCE & ELECTRONICS [1] Feb-Mar 1970 (v.28#1) pg. 69

ANVIL entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ANVIL
xx   METALWORKING TOOL

Bench anvil made from railroad rail or flatiron.
BOYS' LIFE Jan 1964 (v.54#1) pg. 52

How to make and use a bench anvil.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Aug 1981 (v.4#11) pg. 61

Tip on providing an anvil by routing out the top of a workbench and inlaying the sole plate of an old electric iron.
FINE WOODWORKING #134 Jan-Feb 1999 pg. 16

Make your own shop anvil from a short length of railroad track attached to a section of tree trunk (the base).
JEWELRY MAKING, GEMS & MINERALS #522 Apr 1981 pg. 51

Convert a bench block into a small anvil. Useful when punching out pins and rivets, working with jewelry, and other small metalwork.
POPULAR MECHANICS Dec 1974 (v.142#6) pg. 170

Tip: Equip a section of a small (8" diameter) tree trunk with a carrying handle and a base to form a portable chopping block or pounding block.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1984 (v.161#1) pg. 55

Make these 4 tools for your shop. Metalworking skills required to fabricate the tools. (1) Push-apart pliers. (2) Shop anvil. (3) Round-stock cutter. (4) Offset hammer.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1984 (v.161#5) pg. 100

Tip on using a pipe cap as an anvil for light work.
SKINNED KNUCKLES #163 Feb 1990 (v.14#7) pg. 28

APOTHECARY CHEST entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


APOTHECARY CHEST
xx   CHEST OF DRAWERS

Spice boxes feature hidden compartments for special seasonings. Small chest-of-drawer spice boxes were popular in Colonial times, especially around Philadelphia. Drawers are concealed behind a door featuring line-and-berry inlay. Overall dimensions: 19" tall, 14" wide, 12" deep.
FINE WOODWORKING #72 Sep-Oct 1988 pg. 76
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #85 Nov-Dec 1990 pg. 24

Using belt sanding and front-mounted drawer stops to guarantee that multiple drawer fronts always fit flush with the front of a chest of drawers, apothecary chest, etc.
FINE WOODWORKING #104 Jan-Feb 1994 pg. 82
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #106 May-Jun 1994 pg. 12

Herb chest. Build a scaled-down 18th-century herb chest (apothecary chest) featuring 9 small drawers. Overall dimensions: 9" deep x 22" wide x 11" tall.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1985 (v.162#5) pg. 107

Spice cabinet. Wall-hung chest with six small drawers features finger joints at the corners. Overall dimensions: 8"x5"x15" tall.
POPULAR WOODWORKING #104 Sep 1998 (v.18#4) pg. 34

Dresser-top delight. Jewelry case is a chest with twelve roomy drawers. The mitered drawers are decorated with corner keys in a contrasting wood. Overall dimensions: 14"x14"x8" deep.
WOOD MAGAZINE #75 Dec 1994 (v.11#9) pg. 56
Correction WOOD MAGAZINE #77 Feb 1995 (v.12#2) pg. 15

The apothecary chest. A up-to-date version of an American classic. Features 9 single-wide (5"x5"x10") and 8 double-wide (5"x12"x10") drawers. Overall dimensions: 38"x12"x35" tall.
WOOD MAGAZINE #120 Winter 1999 (v.16#9) pg. 50, Insert
Correction WOOD MAGAZINE #125 Jul-Aug 2000 (v.17#5) pg. 10

Box building basics. Step-by-step for a simple set of shelves. Add small drawers to form a set of storage drawers for nails and other small parts (apothecary style). Vary the dimensions to make any size unit.
WOODSMITH #4 Jul 1979 pg. 4

Six drawer spice box. Overall dimensions are 7"x9"x4".
WOODSMITH #6 Nov 1979 pg. 3

Apothecary chest. Nine small drawers (3"x3"x8") fit inside a small case. Construction utilizes several dadoes and rabbets.
WOODSMITH #97 Feb 1995 (v.17) pg. 20, 17

Early American style three drawer chest uses drawer fronts which give the appearance of a 12 drawer apothecary chest. Unit measures (approx.) 29" wide, 12" deep and 22" tall.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Mar-Apr 1978 (v.2#2) pg. 4

Adaptation of a traditional apothecary chest. Appears to have 12 drawers, but actually has 7 drawers. Overall dimensions: 30" wide, 26" tall, 11" deep.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jul-Aug 1987 (v.11#4) pg. 49

Apothecary chest.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1963 (v.19#4) pg. 22

Versatile apothecary chest. Five-drawer unit. Three drawers are 9" wide and 7" high. Two drawers are 30" wide and 7" high, but with false fronts which give the appearance of three drawers. All drawers are 14" deep.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1967 (v.23#4) pg. 28

Wall-hung colonial spice cabinet has eight drawers. Recessed knobs are turned in the drawer fronts. Cabinet is 11" wide, 18" high and 4" deep.
WORKBENCH Nov-Dec 1975 (v.31#6) pg. 64

APPLIANCE COVER entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


APPLIANCE COVER
xx   APPLIANCE
xx   TABLE LINEN

Tip: Use children's drawings to decorate hotpads and appliance covers.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jul 1983 (v.61#7) pg. G6

Shortcake of kitchen strawberries. Strawberry motif to stamp (paint) on canvas kitchen accessories (an apron, toaster cover and kitchen mitt).
CRAFTS Mar 1996 (v.19#3) pg. 46

How to make a quilted hen toaster cover. Pattern and instructions included.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1977 (v.8#7) pg. 119, 61

How to make eyelet appliance covers.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1978 (v.9#7) pg. 75

How to make matching appliance covers for toaster, blender, etc.
FAMILY CIRCLE Mar 27 1978 (v.91#4) pg. 50, 140

Things to make from placemats. Instructions for three styles of purses, a toaster cover, double shoe bag, travel kit for cosmetics, magazine rack, a chair caddy for magazines and a jacket.
FAMILY CIRCLE Aug 28 1979 (v.92#12) pg. 74, 98

Quilted covers for kitchen appliances are appliqued with designs that designate the appliance.
FAMILY CIRCLE Nov 1 1979 (v.92#15) pg. 94, 150

Crochet blender and toaster covers using only single crochet.
FAMILY CIRCLE Oct 7 1980 (v.93#14) pg. 101, 134

An assortment of soft-sculpture appliance covers that look like a can of soup, bag of flour, quart of milk and loaf of bread.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Fall 1979 (v.24#3) pg. 120, 190

Kitchen Maid stuffed doll is really a toaster cover.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Mar-Apr 1982 (v.27#2) pg. 78, 107

Machine appliqued placemats, jar covers, napkin rings, coasters, biscuit caddy, apron, clock face, and a "Please come in" sign all feature a strawberry motif.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS May-Jun 1983 (v.28#3) pg. 54

Cheery country ladies, 6" tall, are appliqued to letter holder, dish-towel holder, and a toaster cover. Larger versions serve as pot holders.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Aug 1986 (v.31#4) pg. 79, 95

Appliance covers with calico appliques that tell what is under each cover.
NEEDLE & THREAD Jan-Feb 1982 (v.2#1) pg. 17, 34, 46

Make a "butterfly" toaster cover in reverse and standard applique with a little quilting.
NEEDLE & THREAD Jul-Aug 1984 (v.4#4) pg. 17, 31, 47

Swedish huck weaving kitchen accessories to embroider and sew. Pot holders, cup towel, toaster cover and placemat and napkin set.
NEEDLECRAFT FOR TODAY Jan-Feb 1980 (v.3#1) pg. 20, 48

100 bazaar best-sellers. Appliqued aprons, quilted tea cozy, napkin holder, quilted placemats (with napkins and rings), crocheted potholders, quilted appliance covers, etc.
WOMAN'S DAY Sep 1 1981 (v.44#14) pg. 72

Pinwheel and windmill quilted patchwork pot holders and a matching toaster cover.
WORKBASKET Feb-Mar 1994 (v.59#3) pg. 14

APPLIANCE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


APPLIANCE
sa   APPLIANCE COVER
sa   APPLIANCE MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
sa   CAN OPENER
sa   CLOTHES DRYER
sa   CLOTHES WASHER
sa   COFFEE MAKER
sa   COFFEE MILL
sa   COOKSTOVE & OVEN
sa   CORN SHELLER
sa   DISHWASHER
sa   ELECTRIC KNIFE
sa   FAN (ELECTRIC)
sa   FOOD GRINDER
sa   FOOD PROCESSOR
sa   GARBAGE DISPOSER
sa   GAS APPLIANCE
sa   GRAIN MILL
sa   HAIR CARE APPLIANCE
sa   HAND DRYER
sa   HOTPLATE
sa   IRON (APPLIANCE)
sa   JUICE EXTRACTOR
sa   MICROWAVE OVEN
sa   MIXER & BLENDER
sa   MODEL & MINIATURE APPLIANCE
sa   PEA SHELLER
sa   RAZOR
sa   REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER
sa   SEWING MACHINE
sa   TOASTER
sa   TOY APPLIANCE
sa   TRASH COMPACTOR
sa   VACUUM CLEANER
x   KITCHEN APPLIANCE

Tips on how to avoid mishaps using portable applicances out-of-doors.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jun 1971 (v.49#6) pg. 82

What to look for when buying a major appliance.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Dec 1971 (v.49#12) pg. 98

How to get the most from floor cleaning appliances.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1972 (v.50#4) pg. 184

How to get more from an electric skillet and electric knife.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS May 1972 (v.50#5) pg. 136

Kitchen buymanship. Seven pages cover available features and buying considerations for major appliances and furnishings. Included are: ranges, refrigerators and freezers, dishwashers, sinks, disposers and compactors, ventilating fans and hoods, cabinets and counters, flooring and small appliances.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS May 1973 (v.51#5) pg. 56

How to install kitchen appliances one over another to save space in a small kitchen. Oven over dishwasher is shown.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #149 Dec 1973 (v.23#9) pg. 46

Thirty ways to save appliance energy. Chart shows how to figure electrical needs.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #201 Sep 1979 (v.29#7) pg. 76

Report on major appliances. How long they last, energy consumption, who the manufacturers really are, repairs, etc.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #267 Mar 1986 (v.36#3) pg. 51

A guide to appliance finishes and trims. Which ones wear best and which are easiest to clean.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING Oct 1980 (v.191#4) pg. 218

How to clean major appliances.
HANDY ANDY May 1980 (v.4#8) pg. 68

A look at what's available in energy-efficient kitchen appliances.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Jan-Feb 1980 (v.5#1) pg. 51

The keys to good appliance performance, smart buying, and careful installation are explored.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO May-Jun 1980 (v.5#3) pg. 42

Special section on kitchen design. Includes articles on how a kitchen design evolves, a guide to functional kitchen design, six kitchen helpers you can make in your shop, and a guide to buying and repairing major appliances.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #676 Aug 1984 (v.80) pg. 36, 39, 48, 55

Guide to buying and repairing major appliances. What to look for, understanding the energy-guide label, what to do before calling the repairman, and repairs you can make.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #676 Aug 1984 (v.80) pg. 55

Less electricity, same good life. How to assess an appliances consumption of electricity and modify their usage to reduce electric bills.
NEW SHELTER Feb 1980 (v.1#1) pg. 45

The independent kitchen. How to avoid depending upon high-priced food from thousands of miles away and how to avoid energy-wasting appliances.
NEW SHELTER Jan 1981 (v.2#1) pg. 24

An appliance "off" reminder. Low-cost project uses a phototransistor to produce an audible alert whenever an appliance indicator light goes off.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1981 (v.19#6) pg. 76

How to pick kitchen appliances.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1996 (v.173#8) pg. 78

Tips on reducing the amount of energy which your appliances consume.
POPULAR SCIENCE Nov 1975 (v.207#5) pg. 106

End kitchen clutter with space-saving built-ins. Tips on building-in major appliances like microwave ovens and compactors and consolidating smaller appliances into one, built-in, food processing type of machine.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1978 (v.212#5) pg. 127

How to shop for energy-saving appliance models.
POPULAR SCIENCE May 1979 (v.214#5) pg. 108

How to child-proof a discarded appliance.
SCIENCE & MECHANICS Oct 1965 (v.36#10) pg. 75

The integrated kitchen. How to blend appliances into the woodwork.
WOOD MAGAZINE #136 Oct 2001 (v.18#7) pg. 64

Life-cycle costing. How to determine if the higher cost of energy-efficient appliances can be justified.
WORKBENCH Jul-Aug 1987 (v.43#4) pg. 17

APPLIANCE MAINTENANCE & REPAIR entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


APPLIANCE MAINTENANCE & REPAIR
xx   APPLIANCE

How to avoid service calls for major appliances.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Mar 1972 (v.50#3) pg. 131

Tips on how to cut appliance service calls on stoves, refrigerators, freezers, garbage disposers, washers and dryers.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1976 (v.54#1) pg. F10 (88+)

A look at service contracts on appliances and how to weigh the costs.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Oct 1979 (v.57#10) pg. 94

Appliance refinishing. How to patch scarred areas invisibly.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #108 Feb 1969 (v.19#1) pg. 49

Be your own appliance repairman. A guide to maintenance and troubleshooting.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #210 Jul-Aug 1980 (v.30#6) pg. 40

How to take things apart. Tips on working with fasteners, nails, plumbing, appliances, etc.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #222 Oct 1981 (v.31#8) pg. 68

How to cut costs when buying or fixing appliances. Tips from Sylvia Porter.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #224 Dec 1981 (v.31#10) pg. 68

Tips on repairing an electric waffle iron.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #278 Apr 1987 (v.37#4) pg. 104

Tip on using typing correction fluid to touch up white kitchen appliances.
FAMILY HANDYMAN #344 Jan 1994 (v.44#1) pg. 63

Troubleshooting cordless appliances and battery chargers.
HANDY ANDY Mar 1981 (v.5#6) pg. 40

Are your appliances safe? Improper installations account for most of the accidents involving major appliance. How to check yours for safety.
HOME MECHANIX #712 Aug 1987 (v.83) pg. 70

Appliance troubleshooting. Simple checks can prevent expensive repair calls. Tips for clothes washers, clothes dryers, dishwashers, ranges, refrigerators and freezers.
HOMEOWNER Apr 1987 (v.12#3) pg. 36

Tip on cleaning the plug-in heat control of an electric fry pan.
HOMEOWNER Jan-Feb 1991 (v.16#1) pg. 66

A short course in basic electricity. Part 5. How to make simple and safe resistance or continuity tests on home appliances.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Mar-Apr 1978 (v.3#2) pg. 85

A checklist of maintenance work that should be done on major home appliances that are used more frequently or will work harder due to summer heat.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO May-Jun 1978 (v.3#3) pg. 24

A short course in basic electricity. Part 6. How to replace an electrical component in an appliance. Gives information on removing an old part, marking terminals, making good connections, and mounting the component.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO May-Jun 1978 (v.3#3) pg. 87

A short course in basic electricity. Part 7. How to use appliance wiring diagrams.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Jul-Aug 1978 (v.3#4) pg. 75

A short course in basic electricity. Part 8. How to use a cycle chart to solve appliance problems.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Sep-Oct 1978 (v.3#5) pg. 116

How to avoid unnecessary appliance service calls.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Jan-Feb 1980 (v.5#1) pg. 110

Troubleshooting an electric skillet which won't operate.
HOMEOWNERS HOW TO Jan-Feb 1981 (v.6#1) pg. 116

Appliance repairs anyone can make.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #521 Oct 1971 (v.67) pg. 98

A look at a career in appliance repair.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #544 Sep 1973 (v.69) pg. 16

How to paint major appliances (refreigerators, freezers,...) using either spray cans or brush.
PARENTS HOME Apr 1981 (v.5#7) pg. 33

Quick repairs for small appliances. Covers checking heat-type appliances, testing a power cord, testing the heating element and thermostat, testing for shorts and testing a faulty motor.
POPULAR MECHANICS Aug 1979 (v.152#2) pg. 98

How to test appliances for electrical continuity.
POPULAR MECHANICS Sep 1979 (v.152#3) pg. 114

How to repaint kitchen appliances (stove, refrigerator, etc.).
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1985 (v.162#1) pg. 152

How to use an ohmmeter (VOM) to test and troubleshoot home appliances.
POPULAR MECHANICS Oct 1987 (v.164#10) pg. 103

Nine-in-one troubleshooter does the work of nine individual test meters by means of one universal meter coupled with six interchangeable test modules. Part 1. Appliance checker and battery analyzer.
POPULAR SCIENCE Feb 1966 (v.188#2) pg. 114

How to prevent appliance breakdowns. Perform regular checkups of home appliances with a VOM. Table of checkpoints and scale settings to use for testing.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1971 (v.199#1) pg. 86

Electrical appliance tester you can build. Check for shorts, continuity, current leakage and measure current draw.
POPULAR SCIENCE Sep 1971 (v.199#3) pg. 124

Small-appliance repair. Part 1. How to repair heating-element appliances using a VOM meter and a screwdriver.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jun 1978 (v.212#6) pg. 46

Small-appliance repair. Part 2. Easy fixes for motor-driven units. Includes a troubleshooting chart to help identify the problem.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1978 (v.213#1) pg. 124

How to maintain and repair appliance finishes.
WORKBENCH Nov-Dec 1970 (v.26#6) pg. 23

How to retouch scratches and nicks in kitchen appliances.
WORKBENCH Mar-Apr 1974 (v.30#2) pg. 46

APPLIQUE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


APPLIQUE
sa   APPLIQUE DESIGNS & PATTERNS
sa   APRON -- APPLIQUED
sa   BEDSPREAD -- APPLIQUED
sa   CHRISTMAS STOCKING -- APPLIQUED
sa   PATCHWORK
sa   PICTURE -- APPLIQUED
sa   PILLOW -- APPLIQUED
sa   POTHOLDER -- APPLIQUED
sa   PURSE -- APPLIQUED
sa   QUILT & QUILTING -- APPLIQUED
sa   RUG -- APPLIQUED
sa   TABLE LINEN -- APPLIQUED
sa   TOTE BAG -- APPLIQUED
sa   WALL HANGING -- APPLIQUED
xx   NEEDLEWORK
xx   PATCHWORK
xx   SEWING

Tip: Use plastic scrap to bond applique to fabric.
CLOTH DOLL Fall 1985 (v.4#1) pg. 39

How to make Mola patches. A history of Mola art and the techniques are described.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #71 Oct 1979 (v.6#11) pg. 36

How to applique shirts. Includes photos of various finished shirts, patterns for tulips and an apple, and a guide to basic embroidery stitches used in applique.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1974 (v.4#7) pg. 28

How to make a Mola, a reverse applique patterned after the needlework done by the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Islands. Pattern and instructions for making a butterfly Mola pillow included.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1975 (v.5#7) pg. 54

How to applique a childs name or initials on a chambray shirt.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Nov 1976 (v.7#2) pg. 31

Reverse applique and quilting. Pattern included for a heart design pillow.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jan-Feb 1980 (v.11#1) pg. 32

Quilted lace applique. Instructions included for a woman's vest and two window quilts.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jan-Feb 1980 (v.11#1) pg. 56

Getting started in applique. Includes instructions for making a quilted infant's jacket.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1980 (v.11#4) pg. 30

How to add cording and applique to home-sewn clothing to add a touch of class.
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING NEEDLECRAFT Spring-Summer 1980 pg. 122, 160

Ideas on combining weaving, applique, and stitchery.
INTERWEAVE Summer 1980 (v.5#3) pg. 41

Tips on how to applique by hand and machine.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Spring 1978 (v.23#1) pg. 70

Tip: How to applique by hand or machine.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Apr 1986 (v.31#2) pg. 46

Step-by-step photos show how to make tiny appliques using freezer paper and glue stick.
McCALLS NEEDLEWORK & CRAFTS Dec 1986 (v.31#6) pg. 57

How to embroider and applique using a sewing machine.
NEEDLE & THREAD May-Jun 1981 (v.1#2) pg. 5

Tips on padded applique.
NEEDLE & THREAD Sep-Oct 1984 (v.4#5) pg. 7

Quiltmaker's Workshop. Twisted-fabric applique technique for use when an appliqued petal or leaf appears to be folded over.
QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE #220 Mar 1990 (v.21#3) pg. 44

Quiltmaker's Workshop. Reverse applique technique explained.
QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE #227 Nov 1990 (v.21#10) pg. 54

Quiltmaker's Workshop. Machine applique techniques.
QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE #228 Dec 1990 (v.21#11) pg. 46

Quiltmaker's Workshop. The starch-and-press technique for speeding preparation of appliques.
QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE #232 May 1991 (v.22#4) pg. 20

Quiltmaker's Workshop. No-template applique'. Describes techniques for applique' by machine, by hand, and reverse applique' by hand.
QUILTER'S NEWSLETTER MAGAZINE #234 Jul-Aug 1991 (v.22#6) pg. 40

Mastering the art of hand applique. Describes making pattern pieces, stitching or slipstitching an applique, stitching bias tape and forming round or oval appliques.
THREADS #4 Apr-May 1986 pg. 49

How to stitch "pa ndau," the traditional folk art of Hmong. It incorporates applique, reverse applique and embroidery. Inset describes symbols drawn from Hmong folklore.
THREADS #9 Feb-Mar 1987 pg. 33

Tip: Use tricot lame in reverse applique (molas) that are done on a sewing machine.
THREADS #21 Feb-Mar 1989 pg. 8

Alphabet applique. Explains the basic method for appliqueing letters. Details pin-matching, the applique stitch and needle-rolling motions.
THREADS #23 Jun-Jul 1989 pg. 33

Clothes for quilters. Piecing and applique used as a facet of garment design. Includes a pattern for a woman's coat with zigzags of applique on the rectangular yoke and down the front. Includes tips on strip piecing and on folding strips and squares to applique them.
THREADS #24 Aug-Sep 1989 pg. 43

Tip: Use a tiny screwdriver to hold down and control the edge of an applique being sewn by machine.
THREADS #26 Dec 1989-Jan 1990 pg. 12
Added Info THREADS #26 Dec 1989-Jan 1990 pg. 4

A look at Koos van den Akker's methods of making machine-appliqued, collaged garments. Describes design, planning and stitching techniques. Drawings detail how to finish machine-applique edges with bias tape, a Hong Kong finish for cuffs, and the technique for mitering outside corners of edge trim.
THREADS #26 Dec 1989-Jan 1990 pg. 29

Animating applique. The process for adding appliqued designs in free-motion machine embroidery.
THREADS #37 Oct-Nov 1991 pg. 44

Piecing perfect points. Technique for invisible hand applique explained.
THREADS #39 Feb-Mar 1992 pg. 46

Tahitian paper cut quilts. How to cut a design from one piece of folded fabric to create the applique for a tifaifai. Instructions for needle-turn applique techniques.
THREADS #42 Aug-Sep 1992 pg. 36

Tip tells how to give lace appliques extra body.
THREADS #49 Oct-Nov 1993 pg. 14

The secrets of professional machine applique. An overview of equipment and techniques.
THREADS #53 Jun-Jul 1994 pg. 70

How to add drama to any garment using traditional mola applique techniques.
THREADS #57 Feb-Mar 1995 pg. 61

Stitchless applique. How to use fusible web. Summary of a working method that simplifies handling many precisely positioned elements.
THREADS #58 Apr-May 1995 pg. 68

Easy applique for complex shapes, a technique also called pillowcase or faced applique. Allows applique of complex shapes quickly.
THREADS #60 Aug-Sep 1995 pg. 69

Machine-stitched applique curves. How to apply trim in complex motifs such as designs used by the ancient Celts.
THREADS #61 Oct-Nov 1995 pg. 26

Edges alive! Appliqued collage is used to alter and enliven a garment's straight edges. Includes instructions for changing any two-piece dartless vest pattern into a single-piece pattern for applying appliqued collage.
THREADS #66 Aug-Sep 1996 pg. 36
Correction THREADS #68 Dec 1996-Jan 1997 pg. 8
Correction THREADS #69 Feb-Mar 1997 pg. 10

How to combine piecing, applique and satin-stitched graphics to create a richly textured garment fabric. Techniques include creating a fabric made up of pieced triangles on applying decorative topstitching and appliqued embellishments. Advice on designing the fabric to compliment a pattern.
THREADS #76 Apr-May 1998 pg. 64

Three-dimensional quilting using sculptural applique. An explanation of techniques and the use of templates for precision applique.
THREADS #77 Jun-Jul 1998 pg. 38

A guide to applique tools and terms. How to use "freezer paper" applique techniques to make a "Rose Wreath" quilt block.
TRADITIONAL QUILTWORKS #8 Jun-Jul 1990 pg. 11

AQUACULTURE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AQUACULTURE
x   FISH FARMING

Suggestions on building a farm pond on your homestead. Covers stocking it with fish and the art of fish management.
COUNTRYSIDE Jul 1979 (v.63#7) pg. 20

A look at digging a homestead pond. Determining soil suitability and water supply. How to deal with the surplus earth and things to consider when planning depth and side slope.
COUNTRYSIDE Sep 1979 (v.63#9) pg. 16

A look at the chief natural hazards for farm ponds in the northern U.S. Covers winter kill of fish, severe weed infestation and wild creatures including turtles and muskrats that eat the fish.
COUNTRYSIDE Oct 1979 (v.63#10) pg. 34

Stocking the homestead pond. How to purchase minnows to feed the big fish.
COUNTRYSIDE Nov 1979 (v.63#11) pg. 35

A look at harvesting a fish pond and the side benefits of keeping pond ducks.
COUNTRYSIDE Dec 1979 (v.63#12) pg. 30

Tips on raising rainbow trout in floating cages.
COUNTRYSIDE & SMALL STOCK JOURNAL Sep-Oct 1987 (v.71#5) pg. 40

A look at Robert Huke's aquadome, a backyard greenhouse over a pond that provides space for year-round crops of fish and vegetables.
HARROWSMITH #20 Jul 1979 (v.3#8) pg. 70

A complete introduction to small-scale trout farming.
HARROWSMITH #20 Jul 1979 (v.3#8) pg. 76

A look at the marginal likelyhood of success in catfish aquaculture in Canada.
HARROWSMITH #25 Jan 1980 (v.4#5) pg. 19

How to get rid of leeches in a pond.
HARROWSMITH #30 Sep 1980 (v.5#2) pg. 24

Build your own ecosystem. Consists of an underground hydroponic greenhouse and aquaculture tank that is powered by the wind, heated by the sun, and fed on compost. Part 1.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #28 Jul 1974 pg. 68

Build your own ecosystem. Part 2.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #29 Sep 1974 pg. 68

How to make money in frog farming.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #52 Jul-Aug 1978 pg. 56

How to construct, stock, and manage your own fishpond.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #63 May-Jun 1980 pg. 80

How to raise fish in underwater cages.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #81 May-Jun 1983 pg. 38

Small-scale trout farming.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #83 Sep-Oct 1983 pg. 130

New ideas for the old farm pond.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #86 Mar-Apr 1984 pg. 56

Greenhouse includes a 1500-gallon tank for raising fresh fish for food. Est. cost: $1500 (plus greenhouse).
NEW SHELTER Apr 1984 (v.5#4) pg. 16

Three articles on fish-farming (aquaculture). First is a report on the two years of testing the practicality of small fish-garden ponds at New Organic Gardening Experimental Farm. Second is a look at various efforts around the world to rediscover age-old fish-farming techniques. Third is a look at nine aquaculture ventures in the Unites States.
ORGANIC GARDENING Mar 1977 (v.24#3) pg. 52, 56, 62

A state of the art report on raising fish in a backyard pond.
ORGANIC GARDENING May 1979 (v.26#5) pg. 134

Homegrown fish. How to have fish without contamination from pollutants.
ORGANIC GARDENING Apr 1984 (v.31#4) pg. 90

The colorful magic of koi. A guide to help decide if koi are fish for your backyard pond. Includes advice on creating a healthy habitat.
SUNSET Aug 1995 (v.195#2) pg. 66

AQUARIUM entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


AQUARIUM
sa   MODEL & MINIATURE AQUARIUM
x   FISH TANK

How to set up an aquarium. Includes instructions on how to buy and care for tropical fish.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1972 (v.50#4) pg. 148

How to build a combination aquarium/terrarium that can host an assortment of plants as well as a turtle and snails, tree frogs, and chameleon or lizards. Instructions for four habitats included: (1) a junior jungle, (2) a miniature marsh, (3) a magic meadow, and (4) a desert oasis.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Nov 1974 (v.52#11) pg. 104, 159

Tip: How to build a storage cabinet with space for a built-in aquarium.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Feb 1979 (v.57#2) pg. 108

How to set up a saltwater aquarium.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1979 (v.57#4) pg. 147

Setting up an aquarium. Some tips on size, filters, fish, etc.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1994 (v.72#4) pg. 210

How to choose, outfit and maintain a 10-gallon aquarium.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1973 (v.63#10) pg. 72

Make a mini-aquarium out of clear plastic shoebox. Fill it with tiny fish and water insects captured in a local lake or stream. Also shows how to make a "waterscope" from a plastic bottle. This device will allow you to look underwater to see what you want to capture.
BOYS' LIFE Mar 1974 (v.64#3) pg. 45

How to prepare an aquarium to receive tropical fish.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1981 (v.71#10) pg. 53

Setting up an aquarium. Some tips.
BOYS' LIFE Dec 1987 (v.77#12) pg. 12

Tropical fish troubles. The top 10 mistakes about aquariums and how to avoid them.
BOYS' LIFE Sep 1989 (v.79#9) pg. 9

Simple, knockdown-style pine bookcase serves to hold phonograph records and an aquarium. Unit measures 30" tall, 30" wide and 12" deep. Est. cost: $30.
CANADIAN WORKSHOP Nov 1981 (v.5#2) pg. 38

An aquarium room divider. House framing considerations for supporting a large (250 gallon) aquarium and related equipment weighing 3,750 pounds.
FINE HOMEBUILDING #72 Feb-Mar 1992 pg. 62

Build the Mermaid I. A submersible heater, made out of junk box 0.5-watt resistors, is used to heat etchant, photo chemicals, fish tanks, etc.
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Nov-Dec 1985 (v.2#6) pg. 80

Hexagon-shaped, frameless aquarium made of glass and sealed with a new waterproof sealant from Dow Corning. Build aquariums of up to 10 gallon capacity without the use of metal frames.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #452 Jan 1966 (v.62) pg. 122

A look at getting started in tropical fish raising. Describes the basic equipment needed and some good starter fish.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #586 Mar 1977 (v.73) pg. 58

How to photograph tropical fish in an aquarium, on color film and using a strobe. Does not require placing your camera in the tank.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1979 (v.43#8) pg. 93

Underwater shooting: The inside story. Three specialists show how to take indoor photographs of fish in small aquariums.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY May 1984 (v.48#5) pg. 70

How to obtain and maintain native fish for the home aquarium.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #90 Nov-Dec 1984 pg. 106

Tip: Use the water from fish aquariums as a plant food.
ORGANIC GARDENING Jan 1981 (v.28#1) pg. 25

Make a small aquarium to use in photographing fish without having to go underwater.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Sep 1986 (v.15#5) pg. 78

The family fish album. How to take great underwater photographs through the sides of your living room aquarium.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Nov 1986 (v.15#7) pg. 36

Static-free thermistorized aquarium heater will not cause radio interference.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1966 (v.25#3) pg. 73

Electronic aquarium heater.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jan 1970 (v.32#1) pg. 60
Correction POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1970 (v.32#3) pg. 14

Circuit designed to switch 240 watts with a change in light levels. Used to operate an aquarium heater.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1971 (v.35#2) pg. 88

Heater control for aquarium or photographic chemical use. Circuit shown will handle up to 200 watts. Used to control immersible or non-immersible heaters.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Sep 1972 (v.2#3) pg. 70

Build an automatic fish feeder. Every 12 hours a solenoid is activated allowing granulated food to fall from a bin into the tank. The amount dispensed is adjustable. There is also a low-food (refill) indicator light.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1991 (v.8#2) pg. 39

Hexagon-shaped coffee table is actually a six-tank aquarium.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1968 (v.129#4) pg. 150

A 10-gallon aquarium that sits in a window. Can also be built into a wall, and surrounded with a picture frame, to create an elegant decoration.
POPULAR MECHANICS Apr 1968 (v.129#4) pg. 150

How to make a unique bubble pond aquarium. Uses 30" diameter plastic bubble and cradle built of redwood or pine. Air-pump filter system is installed to create a waterfall effect. Est. cost: $50.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1973 (v.139#2) pg. 168

A special aquarium for photographing fish.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Apr 1971 (v.68#4) pg. 72

Plexiglas hemisphere (20" diameter) with a plastic top, supported by leather slings attached to an oak framework. Illuminated by an overhead lamp. Combines an aquarium with a coffee or lamp table.
POPULAR SCIENCE Jul 1971 (v.199#1) pg. 78

How to set up and maintain an economical saltwater aquarium.
SCIENCE PROBE! Jul 1991 (v.1#3) pg. 63
Correction SCIENCE PROBE! Jan 1992 (v.2#1) pg. 7 (Definition of pH)

How to raise snails at home.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN Feb 1975 (v.232#2) pg. 104

Aquarium stand. Simple 4-leg table frame holds two 20-29 gallon tanks, one above the other.
WOODWORKER'S JOURNAL Jan-Feb 1978 (v.2#1) pg. 15

Wall aquarium creates a living picture.
WORKBENCH May-Jun 1963 (v.19#3) pg. 9

Contemporary furniture with a flair. Hexagon shaped end table doubles as a large aquarium. Walnut frame is fitted with glass sides and top. Holds 13 gallons of water.
WORKBENCH May-Jun 1981 (v.37#3) pg. 82

ARCHAEOLOGY entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ARCHAEOLOGY
sa   ARCHAEOLOGY PHOTOGRAPHY
xx   SCIENCE

Histogram generating program is written in Commodore BASIC. Included in an article describing an archaeological report generating program.
BYTE Jul 1982 (v.7#7) pg. 76

How to get started in amateur archaeology.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jun 1978 (v.149#6) pg. 98

ARCHERY entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ARCHERY
sa   CROSSBOW
x   ARROW (ARCHERY)
x   BOW & ARROW
xx   SPORTS

Laminated recurve bow is made from fiberglass and wood.
AMERICAN WOODWORKER #32 May-Jun 1993 pg. 48

Archery golf. Plans for a simple course and rules of the game.
BOYS' LIFE Sep 1970 (v.60#9) pg. 78

The beginners guide to archery.
BOYS' LIFE Jul 1980 (v.70#7) pg. 70

The basics of archery. Tips on bow length, arrows, stance, grip and "instinctive shooting".
BOYS' LIFE Jul 1996 (v.86#7) pg. 45

Build a simple bow-and-arrow set capable of shooting 30-40 yards.
BOYS' LIFE Jun 1999 (v.89#6) pg. 38

Make a stone-point arrow the way the Iroquois did long ago.
BOYS' LIFE Nov 2001 (v.91#11) pg. 66

Suggested finish for a wood and fiberglass hunting bow.
FINE WOODWORKING #71 Jul-Aug 1988 pg. 14

Making a custom leather case for a traditional long bow or recurve bow.
LEATHER CRAFTERS & SADDLERS JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1994 (v.4#6) pg. 17, Insert

A quiver for the making. Simple arrow quiver is decorated with either a touch of leather fringe or lots of leather fringe.
LEATHER CRAFTERS & SADDLERS JOURNAL May-Jun 1999 (v.9#3) pg. 38, Insert

Arrow quiver for archers who shoot in tournaments. Includes advice on finding a niche market for custom-made leather goods.
LEATHER CRAFTERS JOURNAL Nov-Dec 1993 (v.3#6) pg. 8, Insert

Tips on hunting with a bow and arrow. A review of equipment and state laws.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #582 Nov 1976 (v.72) pg. 46

At home on the archery range. Tips on selecting equipment and getting started in archery for sport, hunting, etc.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #73 Jan-Feb 1982 pg. 154

Bow-and-arrow "can hunting" game is a good way to pickup litter.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #81 May-Jun 1983 pg. 15

Tips on making a bow and arrows.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #87 May-Jun 1984 pg. 164

Getting close. Advice for the bowhunter on getting close to game animals.
MOTHER EARTH NEWS #113 Sep-Oct 1988 pg. 104

Gun rack stores bow, ammunition and guns.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1963 (v.119#2) pg. 159

Bow and arrow fires harmless corks with a "bang". Pressure exerted by an exploding cap propels the cork.
POPULAR MECHANICS Mar 1966 (v.125#3) pg. 167

How to make a center-shot bow reel for bow and arrow fishing.
POPULAR MECHANICS May 1973 (v.139#5) pg. 153

Making a Northcoast Indian longbow from yew.
WOODWORK #16 Jul-Aug 1992 pg. 36

Tips on making longbows and arrows using ancient materials and techniques.
WOODWORKER Apr 1987 (v.91#4) pg. 300

Bowmen of England. An introduction to the ancient art of making bows and arrows.
WOODWORKING #20 Dec 1990-Jan 1991 pg. 16

Build a 66" laminated recurve bow. Includes instructions for a heat box.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1970 (v.26#5) pg. 40

Make modern compound hunting bows from complete or "scratch" kits. Some tips.
WORKBENCH Sep-Oct 1985 (v.41#5) pg. 94

ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE
sa   SATELLITE RADIO
sa   SATELLITE TELEVISION
sa   WEATHER SATELLITE RECEIVING
x   SATELLITE (ARTIFICIAL)
xx   ASTRONOMY

How to observe artificial satellites.
ASTRONOMY Jun 1984 (v.12#6) pg. 75

How to locate and observe artificial satellites in the night sky.
ASTRONOMY Jul 1998 (v.26#7) pg. 90

Close encounters with satellites. What to expect when viewing artificial satellites and their associated rocket launches.
ASTRONOMY Jul 2002 (v.30#7) pg. 70

Communicating with the astronauts by amateur radio. How to participate in NASA's Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX).
CQ. THE RADIO AMATEUR'S JOURNAL Apr 1995 (v.51#4) pg. 108

A plotting device for predicting the orbit of an earth satellite within 2000 miles of the earth.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN May 1974 (v.230#5) pg. 126

Observing artificial satellites. How to pinpoint their observed position and get an approximate idea of their height and distance. Requires only binoculars, stopwatch, and a star atlas.
SKY & TELESCOPE May 1986 (v.71#5) pg. 457

Astronomical computing. Tracking artificial satellites on your home computer. Some tips and sources of available software.
SKY & TELESCOPE May 1986 (v.71#5) pg. 501

Geostationary satellites. Tips on observing a class of objects your can watch for long periods of time without moving your telescope.
SKY & TELESCOPE Jun 1986 (v.71#6) pg. 557

Photographing artificial earth satellites.
SKY & TELESCOPE Jun 1986 (v.71#6) pg. 563

Observing geosynchronous satellites. Tips to help locate and identify such satellites.
SKY & TELESCOPE Jun 1986 (v.71#6) pg. 606

Motion of a satellite in low orbit. Computer program, written in BASIC, calculates the precession of a satellite's orbit due to effects of an irregular gravitational field caused by equatorial bulge.
SKY & TELESCOPE May 1990 (v.79#5) pg. 543

BASIC program computes the maximum possible elevation angle that an Earth satellite can have above an observer's horizon. Used to determine when and where to look for orbiting satellites.
SKY & TELESCOPE Nov 1990 (v.80#5) pg. 532

Tips on locating and observing the Mir space station.
SKY & TELESCOPE Jul 1995 (v.90#1) pg. 68

How to locate and view geostationary satellites.
SKY & TELESCOPE Jan 2000 (v.99#1) pg. 12
Added Info SKY & TELESCOPE Jun 2000 (v.99#6) pg. 16

Photographing the International Space Station using a video camera attached to a telescope.
SKY & TELESCOPE Dec 2002 (v.104#6) pg. 132

ARTS & CRAFTS entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ARTS & CRAFTS
sa   ART
sa   ARTS & CRAFTS BUSINESS
sa   BASKET
sa   BEAD CRAFT
sa   BLOCK PRINTING
sa   BONE CRAFT
sa   BOOKBINDING
sa   BOTTLE CRAFT
sa   BUTTONCRAFT
sa   CAN CRAFT
sa   CANDLE
sa   CARVING
sa   CASTING & MOLDING
sa   CERAMIC
sa   CHAIN CRAFT
sa   CHIP CARVING
sa   CLOTHES HANGER CRAFT
sa   CLOTHESPIN CRAFT
sa   CORNCOB CRAFT
sa   CORNHUSK CRAFT
sa   DECOUPAGE
sa   DOUGH ART
sa   DRIFTWOOD CRAFT
sa   EGGCRAFT
sa   ENAMELING
sa   ENGRAVING
sa   ETCHING
sa   FEATHERCRAFT
sa   FOLK ART
sa   GILDING
sa   GLASS ETCHING
sa   GOLDSMITHING
sa   HORNCRAFT
sa   INDIAN CRAFT
sa   LEATHER & LEATHERCRAFT
sa   MOBILE
sa   MODEL & MINIATURE
sa   MOSAIC
sa   NUT CRAFT
sa   PAPERCRAFT
sa   PAPERMAKING
sa   PAPIER-MACHE
sa   PASTA ART
sa   PEARL CRAFT
sa   PINE NEEDLE CRAFT
sa   PINECONE CRAFT
sa   PIPE CLEANER CRAFT
sa   PLANT DRYING
sa   PLANT PRESSING
sa   PLASTER CASTING & MOLDING
sa   PRINTING & DUPLICATING
sa   QUILLING
sa   RIBBON WORK
sa   ROPE & ROPECRAFT
sa   RUBBING
sa   SAND ART
sa   SAND PAINTING
sa   SCRIMSHAW
sa   SCULPTURE
sa   SEEDCRAFT
sa   SHELL CRAFT
sa   SILHOUETTE
sa   SILK SCREENING
sa   SILVERSMITHING
sa   SPOOL CRAFT
sa   STAGECRAFT
sa   STAINED GLASS
sa   STENCILING
sa   STICK ART
sa   STRAW WORK
sa   STRING ART
sa   TEXTILE CRAFT
sa   TIN & TIN CRAFT
sa   WALL HANGING
sa   WHEAT & STRAW WEAVING
sa   WIRECRAFT
sa   WOODBURNING
sa   WOODWORKING
sa   YARN CRAFT
x   CRAFTS
x   HANDICRAFT
xx   ART

A look at learn-to-do-something vacations at arts and crafts schools. Article describes one family's vacation at Chautauqua Institution in New York and another at Idyllwilde School of Music and the Arts in California. Includes a list of 30 schools.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Apr 1977 (v.55#4) pg. 199

Unusual op-art and pop-art decoration.
BOYS' LIFE Aug 1965 (v.55#8) pg. 42

Examples of "junk" art.
BOYS' LIFE Mar 1968 (v.58#3) pg. 56

How to recycle kitchen throwaways such as popsicle sticks, disposable spoons and soda straws into craft projects.
BOYS' LIFE Oct 1976 (v.66#10) pg. 58

How to use old designs and ideas and turn them into craft projects for today.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #64 Aug 1978 (v.6#4) pg. 48

Crafts for the disabled. Beginning of a series on crafts for the disabled and those who work with them. Includes instructions for making a Moppet (a yarn pom-pom animal).
CREATIVE CRAFTS #70 Aug 1979 (v.6#10) pg. 32

Crafts for the disabled. How to deal with problems of physical limitations such as arthritis and memory or concentration difficulties.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #71 Oct 1979 (v.6#11) pg. 2

How to start a craft club. Suggestions on programs and structure.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #75 Jun 1980 (v.7#3) pg. 20

How to organize a successful craft workshop. Tips on planning, preparation and presentation.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #88 Aug 1982 (v.8#4) pg. 35

Tips on scheduling ways to have more time for your crafts or hobbies.
CREATIVE CRAFTS & MINIATURES #94 Aug 1983 (v.8#10) pg. 62

A look at the revival of Early American folk art and crafts.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Apr 1974 (v.4#6) pg. 32

Projects for children to make from leftovers, bottles, tissue boxes, plastic eggs, clothespins, etc. Instructions included for a Mrs. Butterworth doll, a funny bird, Humpty Dumpty, a pinwheel, a clothespin butterfly, beads, a headband, an owl eyeglasses case, a tissue box cat, and a Lifesaver doll.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Jul-Aug 1975 (v.5#9) pg. 28

A look at the artists and craftsman of the Caribbean.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Mar 1976 (v.6#5) pg. 30

A look at educational opportunities in crafts. Covers classes taught in craft shops, community adult education classes, manufacturer's training programs, colleges and universities, and arts and crafts schools. Also list books and magazines that will give additional information.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1977 (v.8#7) pg. 16

Tips on how to sign a piece of craft work. Looks at signing various items and types of crafts.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Dec 1977 (v.8#10) pg. 16

Four pages of photos show how to arrange and light craft objects for effective display.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Mar 1979 (v.10#2) pg. 38

A look at schools that teach courses in arts and crafts. Photos and text describe the John C. Campbell Folk School in North Carolina.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS May 1979 (v.10#4) pg. 23

Veteran workshop instructor offers tips on choosing a workshop, on what to pack and tips for making the experience a success.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Mar-Apr 1996 (v.23#2) pg. 52

Puff Art. How to dip cotton balls in a solution of flour and water and then bake them to create jewelry, small figures, etc.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 5 1979 (v.92#8) pg. 54

Treasures from trash. Things to make from plastic soda bottles, bleach bottles, metal boxes, "L'eggs" containers, paper boxes, glass bottles, etc.
FAMILY CIRCLE Jun 19 1984 (v.97#9) pg. 98, 142

Craft parties for kids. General advice on planning the party and choosing a project. Includes instructions for making a balloon clown.
FLOWER & GARDEN [CRAFTS EDITION] Jul-Aug 1997 (v.41#4) pg. 28

How to prepare a speech about your hobby or craft.
LAPIDARY JOURNAL Jun 1979 (v.33#3) pg. 794

Photographing craftsmanship. Tips on producing an illustration for the theme of "Old World Craftsmanship" which shows the quality in a crafted piece.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jun 1986 (v.15#2) pg. 68

Tips on photographing at craft festivals.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1989 (v.96#6) pg. 20

How to teach hands-on skills. The basics of lesson planning.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #66 Spring 1986 (v.17#2) pg. 65

The teaching circuit. An examination of those factors which are part of an excellent class, regardless of the subject. Part 1. Getting started. Evaluating your knowledge. Identifying physical skills and understanding the learning processes.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #110 Spring 1997 (v.28#2) pg. 30

The teaching circuit. Part 2. Creating classes. Format options and teaching styles.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #111 Summer 1997 (v.28#3) pg. 37

The teaching circuit. Part 3. Defining goals and creating lesson plans.
SHUTTLE, SPINDLE & DYEPOT #112 Fall 1997 (v.28#4) pg. 52

ARTS & CRAFTS BUSINESS entries in the Index to How To Do It Information


ARTS & CRAFTS BUSINESS
sa   ART BUSINESS
sa   WEAVING BUSINESS
sa   WOODWORKING BUSINESS
x   TEXTILE CRAFT BUSINESS
xx   ART BUSINESS
xx   ARTS & CRAFTS
xx   BUSINESS

Tip shows how to make a portable frame for displaying paintings at an art show. A-frame is built from plastic-covered wire shelving and wooden braces.
ARTIST'S MAGAZINE Jan 1999 (v.16#1) pg. 38

Tips on selling crafts at outdoor art and craft fairs.
BASKETMAKER #18 Spring 1988 (v.5) pg. 11

Suggestions on how to pursue career goals as an artist and/or craftsperson.
BASKETMAKER #19 Summer 1988 (v.5) pg. 14

Improve record-keeping skills by creating a craftsman's journal. Suggestions on features that will make it most useful.
BASKETMAKER #25 Winter 1990 (v.7) pg. 10

Advice on how to start and maintain a successful bead business on the Internet.
BEAD & BUTTON #32 Aug 1999 pg. 18

Can you make money with your crafts? Pointers for setting up a business with crafts.
BETTER HOMES & GARDENS Jan 1975 (v.53#1) pg. 24

In-home craft business insurance needs discussed.
CHIP CHATS May-Jun 1997 (v.44#3) pg. 6

Five tips on how to sell handcrafts to a tight budget market.
CRAFTS May 1991 (v.14#5) pg. 8

Ten questions for craft fair exhibitors to consider before signing a contract to exhibit.
CRAFTS Aug 1991 (v.14#8) pg. 6

Product tags and labels. A guide to those required by law and others that add a touch of professionalism to handcrafted items.
CRAFTS Jan 1992 (v.15#1) pg. 12

Tips to save money and increase response to ads for handcrafted items.
CRAFTS Apr 1992 (v.15#4) pg. 12

Tips on how to create a sales brochure for handcrafts.
CRAFTS May 1992 (v.15#5) pg. 10

Marketing crafts with postcards. Tips on creating an image and using postcards to announce new products, special offers, etc.
CRAFTS Aug 1992 (v.15#8) pg. 12

How to make personalized tags, labels and headers for craft products.
CRAFTS Aug 1992 (v.15#8) pg. 32

Solutions for sluggish sales of crafts. Ideas on product and marketing changes to make.
CRAFTS Sep 1992 (v.15#9) pg. 14

Change can equal profit. Advice on seeking new markets for handcrafts.
CRAFTS Jul 1993 (v.16#7) pg. 8

Pricing perspective. Tips on when to raise prices on handcrafts.
CRAFTS Dec 1993 (v.16#12) pg. 14

Selling what you make. Learn how to cash in on the craft mall "craze". Part 1. How craft malls operate and finding a good one.
CRAFTS Mar 1995 (v.18#3) pg. 10

Selling what you make. Learn how to cash in on the craft mall "craze". Part 2. Tips from a crafter who sells 70,000 angel figures per year through craft malls.
CRAFTS Apr 1995 (v.18#4) pg. 10

Selling what you make. Learn how to cash in on the craft mall "craze". Part 3. Selling through franchise retail craft outlets.
CRAFTS May 1995 (v.18#5) pg. 10

Selling what you make. Learn how to cash in on the craft mall "craze". Part 4. Five potential problem areas.
CRAFTS Jun 1995 (v.18#6) pg. 10

How to stay out of legal and financial trouble when a shop or craft mall closes owing money or return of merchandise to a handcrafter.
CRAFTS Jul 1997 (v.20#7) pg. 8

Selling what you make. Part 2. How to reduce chances of a financial loss in a craft mall.
CRAFTS Jan 1998 (v.21#1) pg. 10

Selling crafts on the Internet. Part 1 of 3. Mailing lists, the pros and cons of e-mail.
CRAFTS Feb 1999 (v.22#1) pg. 74

Selling crafts on the Internet. Part 2 of 3. How to register a Web site.
CRAFTS Mar 1999 (v.22#2) pg. 90

Selling crafts on the Internet. Part 3 of 3. Bulletin boards, chat rooms and Web sites.
CRAFTS Apr 1999 (v.22#3) pg. 55

How to earn money teaching crafts.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #61 Feb 1978 (v.6#1) pg. 44

How to make money teaching crafts in your own studio, shop or home.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #62 Apr 1978 (v.6#2) pg. 40

Display systems to build for your craft work. Four simple ones to take to fairs and shows described. Other more elaborate booths pictured.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #62 Apr 1978 (v.6#2) pg. 44

How to earn money lecturing about crafts.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #63 Jun 1978 (v.6#3) pg. 46

How to plan and deliver a lecture on a craft.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #64 Aug 1978 (v.6#4) pg. 37

How to determine what craft products you should make for sale.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #65 Oct 1978 (v.6#5) pg. 30

How to price handcrafted products.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #66 Dec 1978 (v.6#6) pg. 30

Marketing handcrafted objects and the legal aspects of selling that you should know about. Covers your legal structure, copyrights, trademarks, patents, small claims court and volunter lawyers.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #67 Feb 1979 (v.6#7) pg. 21

The financial implications of selling your handcrafted items. What you need to know about insurance, accounting, and taxes.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #68 Apr 1979 (v.6#8) pg. 51

Getting publicity for you and your craft business. Covers writing a press release, working with newspapers, radio and TV and places you can display and lecture.
CREATIVE CRAFTS #69 Jun 1979 (v.6#9) pg. 59

Guidelines on selling your crafts.
CREATIVE CRAFTS & MINIATURES #91 Feb 1983 (v.8#7) pg. 62

Tips on selling your crafts or miniatures through established shops.
CREATIVE CRAFTS & MINIATURES #95 Oct 1983 (v.8#11) pg. 46

Selling through museum shops. A seldom considered market for handcrafted goods. Some tips.
CREATIVE CRAFTS & MINIATURES #99 Jun 1984 (v.9#3) pg. 55

How to sell your craft at fairs, festivals and flea markets.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Sep 1974 (v.4#10) pg. 34

Tips on how to sell your craft work. Includes information on developing a line, pricing your work, display, selling in a shop, arts and crafts fairs, and party-plan selling.
DECORATING & CRAFT IDEAS Mar 1977 (v.8#2) pg. 11

How to publish decorative designs as pattern packets. Includes tips on analyzing a design for salability and skill level, evaluating the instructions, including a photo, testing market reaction, pricing and marketing the packets.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Nov-Dec 1989 (v.16#6) pg. 16

Evaluating arts and crafts shows. How to select shows and fairs that will best promote and sell your artwork.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Jan-Feb 1990 (v.17#1) pg. 14

How to sell your teaching skills as a decorative artist. Nine ways to find and keep students.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Mar-Apr 1990 (v.17#2) pg. 12

How to promote decorative art seminars, books, patterns and artwork using direct mail.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK May-Jun 1990 (v.17#3) pg. 18

Doing painting demonstrations that showcase your talent. Includes tips on doing demonstrations at conventions, open houses, and as product endorsements. Suggestions on how to get organized to put one on.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Jul-Aug 1990 (v.17#4) pg. 14

Selling wearable art. Three artists detail how and where (home parties, craft fairs, shops, etc.)
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Sep-Oct 1990 (v.17#5) pg. 18

The business of home teaching. Everything you need to know to teach decorative painting from your home.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Nov-Dec 1990 (v.17#6) pg. 18

Making money with your art. Six top artists share tips on how to sell decorative artwork.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK May-Jun 1994 (v.21#3) pg. 38

Advice on how to get started teaching decorative painting.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Sep-Oct 1994 (v.21#5) pg. 8

Advice on turning a decorative painting hobby into a business.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Jul-Aug 1997 (v.24#4) pg. 6

Where and how to sell decorative painting.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Jul-Aug 1997 (v.24#4) pg. 56

Advice on how to price decorative-painting artwork.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Nov-Dec 1997 (v.24#6) pg. 8

Tips on how to submit a project for publication in a magazine or for greeting cards.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Jan-Feb 1998 (v.25#1) pg. 6

Advice on getting started publishing and selling pattern packets.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK May-Jun 1998 (v.25#3) pg. 8

Advice on how to determine what to charge for paint and faux finishing jobs.
DECORATIVE ARTIST'S WORKBOOK Sep-Oct 1998 (v.25#5) pg. 9

How to determine an hourly figure which a craftsman must charge in order to make a living at his craft. A look at overhead expenses, and retail and wholesale pricing.
FINE WOODWORKING #6 Spring 1977 pg. 54

Figuring costs. How to use a working drawing, pricing sheet and job cost envelope to prepare estimates and record costs for producing products in the small shop.
FINE WOODWORKING #26 Jan-Feb 1981 pg. 38
Added Info FINE WOODWORKING #28 May-Jun 1981 pg. 10

How to go about selling your crafts.
HANDMADE #8 Spring 1983 (v.3#1) pg. 15

How to compute the break-even point of a craft business.