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PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM PROCESSING entries in Index to How To Do It Information
Norman Lathrop Enterprises  
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Detailed entries for one subject from the INDEX TO HOW TO DO IT INFORMATION.
Click on a see also (sa) or tracing (xx) to view detailed entries about a related subject.
The entries are in alphabetical order by magazine name and then in chronological sequence.
To obtain a copy of any magazine article contact your local public library or the publisher.

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM PROCESSING
sa   MOTION PICTURE FILM PROCESSING
sa   PHOTOCHEMISTRY
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DEVELOPER
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM DRYING
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM PROCESSING (COLOR)
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM PROCESSING EQUIPMENT
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM WASHING
sa   PHOTOGRAPHIC NEGATIVE REDUCTION & INTENSIFICATION
xx   PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM

Photography in astronomy. Get the most from your deep-sky negatives. Tips on careful development, good printing, enhancing a weak negative, and fighting down grain.
ASTRONOMY Oct 1980 (v.8#10) pg. 50

Photography in astronomy. Processing your astronegatives.
ASTRONOMY Nov 1980 (v.8#11) pg. 69

How to develop your own black-and-white film at home.
BOYS' LIFE Jun 1980 (v.70#6) pg. 70

Techniques for developing the negative. A step-by-step description of film processing includes tips on push-and-pull processing, agitation, contact printing, etc.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Feb 1991 (v.13#2) pg. 48
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Jul 1991 (v.13#7) pg. 4

Processing T-Max 100 4x5 film in Kodak Technidol allows great flexibility in both contracting and expanding contrast.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Mar 1991 (v.13#3) pg. 30

Tip on identifying 4x5 sheet film for N development by clipping one or more corners.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Jun 1991 (v.13#6) pg. 4

Tip on avoiding "stable surge lines" when processing film using the dip-and-dunk method.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Aug 1991 (v.13#8) pg. 6
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Jan 1992 (v.14#1) pg. 7

Contrast matching. (1) Selection of film for a particular application can be aided by examination of the H and D curves. (2) Varying characteristics of negative film by changing developer type, time, temperature, etc. (3) N-1 development technique.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Aug 1991 (v.13#8) pg. 53
Correction CAMERA & DARKROOM Oct 1991 (v.13#10) pg. 4
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Jan 1992 (v.14#1) pg. 8
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Apr 1992 (v.14#4) pg. 8

Tips on avoiding "air bells" when processing film.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Nov 1991 (v.13#11) pg. 16
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Feb 1992 (v.14#2) pg. 2
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Apr 1992 (v.14#4) pg. 2

Processing black-and-white film for optimum quality. Looks at equipment, chemistry, and technique.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Nov 1991 (v.13#11) pg. 30

Tip on using Ilford Universal Wash Aid to clear the magenta cast from T-Max film.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Jan 1992 (v.14#1) pg. 16
Added Info CAMERA & DARKROOM Dec 1992 (v.14#12) pg. 15

Developing film by inspection. Formulas and techniques for using this early 1900's technique.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Jul 1992 (v.14#7) pg. 56

Tips on developing T-Max film.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Oct 1992 (v.14#10) pg. 6

Film processing tips. (1) Process Kodak Technical Pan film in Agfa Rodinal. (2) Process Kodak T-Max P3200 film in Edwal FG-7. (3) Use only half a tank of developer combined with continuous rolling agitation.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Dec 1992 (v.14#12) pg. 15

Tip on boosting negative contrast when developing T-Max 100 in HC-110B.
CAMERA & DARKROOM Oct 1993 (v.15#10) pg. 6

Film developing using monobaths and in-cassette processing. Includes formulas for four different monobath developer/fixer mixtures. Ideal when processing 20- or 24-exposure 35mm film inside the metal cassette.
CAMERA & DARKROOM May 1994 (v.16#5) pg. 57

Tip on how to process two different sized roll film tanks which might even contain two different types of film and require two different developing periods at the same time without getting confused.
CAMERA 35 Mar 1973 (v.17#2) pg. 6

David Vestal's book of craft. Chapter 11. Contrast control. How to fine tune your negatives. Controlling negative contrast during development.
CAMERA 35 Apr 1973 (v.17#3) pg. 48

The Zone VI workshop. How to determine a standard development time for your film and developer combination.
CAMERA 35 Sep-Oct 1973 (v.17#7) pg. 37

Seventeen recipes for souping Tri-X. Arriving at precise exposure indices for Tri-X depending upon what developer, dilution, time and temperature are used.
CAMERA 35 Dec 1975 (v.19#9) pg. 42

Forced development. A technique for saving a picture when you have underexposed it. Looks at Tri-X, Panatomic-X and Plus-X film forced developing.
CAMERA 35 Dec 1975 (v.19#9) pg. 54

Review of the Optimate black-and-white developing system. It takes only 8 minutes, allows mixing emulsion types in one tank, and does not have critical temperature requirements.
CAMERA 35 Feb 1980 (v.25#2) pg. 28

Film/developer combinations: No.1. Kodak Tri-X processed in six developers. A comparison of grain, sharpness and emulsion speed.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1984 (v.5#1) pg. 14

Taming film contrast with water-bath development. Used to enhance the tonal range of a high-contrast subject negative and to improve negatives of normal-contrast subjects.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1984 (v.5#1) pg. 43
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1984 (v.5#6) pg. 7

Film/developer combinations: No.2. Ilford HP5 processed in seven developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1984 (v.5#2) pg. 12
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1984 (v.5#5) pg. 4

Film/developer combinations: No.3. Kodak Plus-X processed in seven developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1984 (v.5#3) pg. 11

Film/developer combinations: No.4. Agfapan 25 processed in seven developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1984 (v.5#4) pg. 12

Printing to perfection. Part 1. How to use a reference negative and reference print to aid you in making better black-and-white prints. Includes tips on correct exposure and development of B&W negatives.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1984 (v.5#5) pg. 16

Film/developer combinations. No.5. Kodak Panatomic-X processed in seven developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1984 (v.5#5) pg. 29

Film/developer combinations. No.6. Kodak Tri-X Pan 120 processed in 10 developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1984 (v.5#6) pg. 34
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1990 (v.11#5) pg. 23

Film/developer combinations. No.7. Test conclusions.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1985 (v.6#1) pg. 22

How to calculate development times at elevated temperatures when using sodium sulfate as an antireticulation agent.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1986 (v.7#1) pg. 15

Tip on processing Ilford XP-1 chromogenic film for greatest permanence.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1986 (v.7#4) pg. 12

Lowering b&w contrast in your negatives when filming subjects that have excessive brightness. Six methods tested with Plus-X sheetfilm.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1986 (v.7#6) pg. 36

Lowering contrast in Kodak T-Max b&w films. Five combinations of film and developer are tested.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1987 (v.8#2) pg. 20

How and why pinholes are formed in b&w films when an acid stop bath is used with some film developers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1987 (v.8#4) pg. 4

Tips on processing Ilford HP5 film.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1987 (v.8#4) pg. 8

Comments on processing Ilford XP1 (a dye-forming b&w film) and making prints on color paper using ordinary minilab equipment.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1987 (v.8#5) pg. 8

Latensification. How to increase shadow detail in b&w film by exposing to a green safelight prior to development.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1987 (v.8#6) pg. 9

Processing considerations when using Ilford's XP1 chromogenic b&w film.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1987 (v.8#6) pg. 10
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1988 (v.9#1) pg. 14

Large-format photography. Part 4. Perspective control, making an exposure, and film development.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1987 (v.8#6) pg. 24

Expansion or compaction (plus or minus) development of Plus-X Pan film and T-Max 100 film that is consistent with the Zone system.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1987 (v.8#6) pg. 72

Tips on overexposing 35mm T-Max film and then underdeveloping to achieve "normal" contrast. How to determine your own exposure index and development time.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1988 (v.9#2) pg. 15

Reversal processing the T-Max films. Includes the formulas for first developer, bleach, and clearing bath.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1988 (v.9#2) pg. 26
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1988 (v.9#5) pg. 8
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1989 (v.10#2) pg. 2

Tip on using diluted developer to eliminate hyperactivity when doing rotary processing of black-and-white film.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1988 (v.9#3) pg. 2

Tip on getting unblocked highlights and greater tonal range by (1) controlling development time and (2) adding sulfite to the developer.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1988 (v.9#3) pg. 14

Controlling tone reproduction. Film development versus paper grades.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1988 (v.9#5) pg. 34

Optimizing T-Max P3200. Processing recommendations for speed and contrast control of Kodak T-Max P3200.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1989 (v.10#3) pg. 31
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1990 (v.11#1) pg. 2

The mathematical relationship between development time and temperature examined.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1989 (v.10#5) pg. 50

Tips on processing sheet film to avoid surface abrasions.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1990 (v.11#1) pg. 20

Tips on eliminating clear areas on film caused by dust clinging to the film during development.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1990 (v.11#4) pg. 16

Developing film by inspection in bright light by using desensitizers.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1991 (v.12#3) pg. 59

How to reverse-process Kodalith and other black-and-white films. Includes formulas for several bleaches.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1992 (v.13#1) pg. 11

Direct positive transparencies by Sabatier development (solarization).
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1992 (v.13#1) pg. 23

Technical Pan film developers and development.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1992 (v.13#2) pg. 44
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1992 (v.13#5) pg. 6
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1992 (v.13#6) pg. 6

Black-and-white film development. Part 1. What the film curves mean.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1992 (v.13#6) pg. 50

Black-and-white film development. Part 2. Speed point alternatives.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1993 (v.14#1) pg. 56

Black-and-white film development. Part 3. Curve shape comparisons. Characteristic curve graphs display the relationships among exposure, development, and the resulting image density.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1993 (v.14#2) pg. 23

Tips on avoiding reticulation problems in film processing.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1993 (v.14#3) pg. 7

Black-and-white film development. Part 4. Pushing film.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1993 (v.14#3) pg. 26

The basic black-and-white film reversal process and chemicals are described.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1993 (v.14#4) pg. 8

How prewetting or presoaking film can affect the image. Results of a test series on b&w film.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1994 (v.15#3) pg. 24

The differences in film agitation recommendations between film and developer manufacturers are explained. Film processing tips included.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jan-Feb 1995 (v.16#1) pg. 16

Tips on eliminating the slight pink or purple color cast found on Kodak T-Max negatives.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1995 (v.16#4) pg. 11
Added Info DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1995 (v.16#6) pg. 4

Applying the "Taguchi Method" designed experiment to determine the proper combination of dilution, agitation, time and temperature to produce the optimum film processing results.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1995 (v.16#5) pg. 11

Tip on determining the approximate full development time when using a film developer of incorrect dilution.
DARKROOM & CREATIVE CAMERA TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1995 (v.16#6) pg. 20

Tip: Kodak Verichrome Pan 120 acts like a high contast film when developed in a high-contrast developer.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Mar-Apr 1979 (v.1#1) pg. 14

Darkroom basics. Processing that first roll of black and white film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1979 (v.1#2) pg. 24

Description of a simple, inexpensive film-pushing technique that produces an effective ASA of 3200 from Tri-X film, with a tonal range and a grain that come close to the same film shot at its normal ASA 400.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1979 (v.1#2) pg. 56

How to save your ASA. How to process a roll of film shot at the wrong ASA in order to save the pictures.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1979 (v.1#2) pg. 60

Tip: Push process Tri-X in Kodak HC-110 replenisher to get an effective ASA of 4000.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jul-Aug 1979 (v.1#3) pg. 13

Strategies for sheet film processing.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jul-Aug 1979 (v.1#3) pg. 64

To push or not to push. The truth and the problems involved with push-processing of film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1979 (v.1#4) pg. 64

How to prevent bromide drag, the streaking that occurs on negatives when the various bromide byproducts released by the action of the developer on the film are not swept away by efficient agitation.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1979 (v.1#4) pg. 74

Two photographers, Robert McQuilkin and Glenn Steiner explain how they get extremely fine grained negatives on Tri-X and Plus-X film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1979 (v.1#5) pg. 30

Getting personal about film developing. Part 1. How to run a simple test to find the developing time that is unique to you.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1979 (v.1#5) pg. 55

Tip: Eliminate pinholes in film negatives by substituting a water bath for the stop bath.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1979 (v.1#6) pg. 8

Getting personal about film developing. Part 2.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1979 (v.1#6) pg. 64

Process large quantities of sheet film using deep tanks. Some tips.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1979 (v.1#6) pg. 66

How to avoid ruining your negatives during development. Photos illustrate results of improper handling.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Mar-Apr 1980 (v.2#2) pg. 20

The fine art of developing large-format negatives by inspection.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1980 (v.2#3) pg. 74

Fighting stains and fog on negatives and prints. Prevention is better and cheaper than correction.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1980 (v.2#5) pg. 23

Tip: Correct method for developing Tri-X rated at an exposure index of 200.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1981 (v.3#5) pg. 8

Processing your first roll of black-and-white film. A step-by-step description.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1982 (v.4#4) pg. 68

Using Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film. Includes formula for POTA developer and hints on development with POTA or Technidol LC developer.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1983 (v.5#1) pg. 52
Added Info DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May-Jun 1983 (v.5#4) pg. 9

Darkroom basics. Tips on push processing of b&w film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1983 (v.5#2) pg. 44

Equipment and techniques for processing sheet film are viewed.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1983 (v.5#7) pg. 86

Tip on processing old b&w film when you don't know the type of film or the proper development times.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1984 (v.6#5) pg. 14

How to do direct positive black-and-white film and print processing using a modular chemical system from "Sprint Systems of Photography".
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1984 (v.6#7) pg. 54

35mm verses 4x5. With meticulous technique and fine-grain film, you can come surprisingly close to 4x5 quality with a 35mm camera. A combination of 35mm film, developer, and printing method that most closely approximates a 4x5 camera equipped with Tri-X film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jan-Feb 1985 (v.7#1) pg. 18

Under-the-gun processing. How one photojournalist shaves valuable minutes off his processing time to meet tough deadlines.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1985 (v.7#6) pg. 62

Tip: Calculate the proper fixing time for B&W films by testing a strip of the film's leader while development is taking place.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jan-Feb 1986 (v.8#1) pg. 8

Darkroom 1A. Introductory darkroom class for beginners. Part 1. Processing your first role of b&w film and making your first print.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1986 (v.8#5) pg. 54
Added Info DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Dec 1986 (v.8#8) pg. 12

Tip: Use a brief water rinse between stop bath and fixer to prolong the life of the fixer.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1986 (v.8#6) pg. 12

Film development tips to prevent "air bells".
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1986 (v.8#6) pg. 16

100%-effective method for removing air bells when processing Kodak Technical Pan film.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1986 (v.8#7) pg. 15

Tip on processing T-Max 400 film in HC-110 developer.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jul 1988 (v.10#3) pg. 14

Getting normal. Description of a simple procedure to determine your personal working exposure index and film developing time tailored to the normal grade of your favorite black-and-white paper. Part 1. Testing for your maximum effective negative.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1989 (v.11#1) pg. 15

The D log C curve. A new approach to systemizing B&W film processing improves on the traditional Zone System.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1989 (v.11#2) pg. 45
Correction DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY May 1989 (v.11#5) pg. 3

Getting normal. Part 2. A simple film test for your maximum effective negative. How to make and use a Tone Cycle Interpreter.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1989 (v.11#2) pg. 50

Gamma Photolabs. Behind the scenes at a custom black-and-white lab. Includes tips which may help your own B&W processing.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1989 (v.11#3) pg. 26

Getting normal. Part 3. Determining your working film index and using the Tone Cycle Interpreter.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1989 (v.11#3) pg. 47

Tip on developing T-Max 100 with HC110B developer in a small tank.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1989 (v.11#6) pg. 7

Processing technique for Kodak's Technical Pan film is suitable for use with either powdered Technidol LC developer or liquid developers.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1990 (v.12#3) pg. 9

Get smart about control. How modern films and developers have altered the science of contrast control. Advice on matching overall negative contrast to your chosen paper.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Apr 1990 (v.12#4) pg. 8

Developing technique for Kodak T-Max 400 (which is very sensitive to variations in pH and agitation).
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1990 (v.12#10) pg. 17

Bring on the night. Developing tricks to enhance your available-light photography.
DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1990 (v.12#10) pg. 44

The graphic arts darkroom. Tips on safelight illumination, lithographic films and film processing.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Fall 1979 pg. 27

Big results from small negatives. How to get grainless 16X and 20X enlargements from 35mm by using Kodak Technical Pan SO-115 film and Perfection Micrograin developer.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Winter 1980 (v.1#1) pg. 14

Standardized system for fine grain prints uses Kodak Panatomic-X film processed in Rodinal developer.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Winter 1980 (v.1#1) pg. 20

Pushing Kodak Tri-X film for newspaper work. Very useful in low-light sports photography.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Winter 1980 (v.1#1) pg. 58

Basic black & white. Extension 2. Development of the film is an important control over the creation of a photographic image. How to perform a series of tests on your film and developer.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Spring 1980 (v.1#2) pg. 50

The professional amateur's notebook. Part 1. Improve print quality though correct exposure and development. First in a systematic technical approach to moderately serious b&w photography.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Oct 1980 (v.1#3) pg. 16

Quality control in your b&w darkroom. Part 1. How to use a 10-step gray scale to test controllable variables in camera, lens, film, and developer.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Oct 1980 (v.1#3) pg. 56

Quality control in your b&w darkroom. Part 2. What effect changes in materials or equipment will have on your final results.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Mar 1981 (v.2#1) pg. 27

The professional amateur's notebook. Part 3. How to vary your film development time to achieve a technically perfect b&w print.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Mar 1981 (v.2#1) pg. 35

How to make b&w slides from b&w negative film by processing in reversal chemistry.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Dec 1981 (v.2#4) pg. 67

No-worry push processing. Use hydrogen peroxide to hike EI (exposure index) with minimal grain.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Mar 1982 (v.3#1) pg. 22

Achieving fine grain is a combination of factors, including a clean lens, correct exposure, clear air, careful development, etc.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Jun 1982 (v.3#2) pg. 12

How to develop your first roll of b&w film.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Mar-Apr 1983 (v.4#2) pg. 34

Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film. Tips on using and processing this b&w film with emphasis on 4x5 format.
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1983 (v.4#6) pg. 16

How to develop film by inspection method.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY May 1976 (v.25#5) pg. 8

Black & white slide production. A review of various means of producing them including direct positive and positive release methods. Emphasis is on choices of film and developer.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1978 (v.27#2) pg. 33

How to run an exposure and development test on the film you normally use. This exercise will help improve your technique.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY May 1979 (v.28#5) pg. 16

How to reduce grain in 35mm b&w photography by selection of the proper film/developer combination. Other tips on grain reduction also given.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1983 (v.32#10) pg. 40

Modernage Photo Services, a custom photolab in New York City, describes how they process black-and-white film and prints.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1984 (v.33#2) pg. 16

Tips on processing black-and-white film resulting in no dust spots, finger prints, oil films, or spots to distract from the quality of the prints.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1984 (v.33#3) pg. 10

Fine shades of black and white. Tips on processing Kodak Technical Pan B&W film.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1987 (v.36#2) pg. 10

Push processing tests of Ilford HP5 Plus at ISO 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 are compared.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1990 (v.39#2) pg. 54

Processing defects in negatives and prints. Full-page charts list the appearance of defect, possible causes, preventative procedures and remedial action to take.
INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1990 (v.39#10) pg. 20

Darkroom basics. Getting started in processing your own black and white film and making enlarged prints.
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED #535 Dec 1972 (v.68) pg. 78

Tips on developing 4x5 negatives. Includes plans for a sheet metal washing tank for 4x5's.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1966 (v.30#10) pg. 96

Tips on processing sheet film in the darkroom.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Jul 1968 (v.32#7) pg. 53

Work out your own development times for personal film developer combinations.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1969 (v.33#8) pg. 30

How to develop sheet film.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1970 (v.34#2) pg. 146

Tips on contrast control in sheet film, including development by inspection and use of special developers.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1970 (v.34#3) pg. 40

The 1970 film developer roundup. Chart shows best developing time for a particular combination of developer and black and white film.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1971 (v.35#2) pg. 64

Tips on using H&W control film developer concentrate and Kodak high contrast copy film to produce a negative with high sharpness and brilliance.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1971 (v.35#9) pg. 20

Photos illustrate the effect on grain structure that seven developer combinations have on three Kodak black and white films (Tri-X, Plus-X, and Panatomic-X).
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1972 (v.36#9) pg. 88

How to determine correct development times for an unfamiliar film and developer combination by processing light-struck film leader.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1972 (v.36#10) pg. 88

Maximum brightness in prints may require maximum development of the film, especially when the subject has a short brightness range (4 stops or less).
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1972 (v.36#11) pg. 31

Eight examples of push processing of Kodak Tri-X and 2475 film in order to film under extremely low light levels. Exposure indexes up to 6400 are possible with the right combination of film and developer.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1973 (v.37#6) pg. 72

Illustrations and text show how to develop film.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1974 (v.38#10) pg. 140

Proper developer technique may be more important than the developer itself in producing good film negatives.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1976 (v.40#3) pg. 21

What can your film really do? Make a 2-way test strip on film by bracketing both exposure and development time. Shows you what a given B&W film can deliver at 5 different exposure indexes when developed for 5 different degrees of contrast.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1981 (v.45#9) pg. 100

How to process sheet film. Hints on handling, processing procedures, and the equipment to use.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1983 (v.47#11) pg. 36

Process Kodak Technical Pan film in Dektol to produce a high-contrast negative.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1986 (v.50#9) pg. 45

Photographs with sharp detail and glowing highlights are pulled from Tri-X through precise overexposure and careful development in Microdol-X.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1988 (v.52#9) pg. 26

Achieve fine detail and tonal range from Kodak's Tech Pan 35mm film by processing in Rodinal.
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1988 (v.52#11) pg. 65

Byrd bath. A compensating film development system for high-contrast black-and-white images that exploits the film's latitude without degrading image quality. Includes formulas for the first and second developers and special stop bath.
PHOTO ELECTRONIC IMAGING 1994 (v.37#5) pg. 34

Processing for archival preservation.
PHOTO METHODS FOR INDUSTRY Jan 1971 (v.14#1) pg. 44

Using H&W film and chemicals to achieve large blowups.
PHOTO METHODS FOR INDUSTRY Mar 1972 (v.15#3) pg. 56

Photographing, processing and printing the Kodak Gray Scale under controlled conditions can help establish criteria for evaluating photographic materials and darkroom practice.
PHOTO METHODS FOR INDUSTRY Aug 1973 (v.16#8) pg. 32

How a little extra expenditure of time and chemistry can produce truly archival black and white negatives. Tips on proper washing and fixing of negatives.
PHOTO METHODS FOR INDUSTRY Mar 1974 (v.17#3) pg. 38

Home darkroom technique for removing anti-halation backings from film. Includes a formula for a backing removal solution.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1996 (v.17#3) pg. 7

Edge effects (i.e. the Eberhard effect and Mackie line) phenomenon is explained. Includes the Beutler film developer formula which enhances edge phenomena.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES Sep-Oct 1996 (v.17#5) pg. 22

Relationship between film area and developer quantity and its effect when using one-shot developers and/or drum processing.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1996 (v.17#6) pg. 16

Can film really be pushed? How effective are the techniques of pushing (abnormally increasing) or pulling (abnormally reducing) film development.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES Jul-Aug 1997 (v.18#4) pg. 48

Tips on the reuse of film presoak water and PhotoFlo (or equivalent) end-process solutions.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES May-Jun 1998 (v.19#3) pg. 21

Pyro development for dual-purpose negatives. Covers both rotary and tray processing techniques, film recommendations, and printing. A related article gives four developer formulas.
PHOTO TECHNIQUES Nov-Dec 1999 (v.20#6) pg. 44, 51

Talking Tech. Number 1. Glossary of terms used to describe the process of film exposure and development.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jan 1978 (v.6#9) pg. 32

Talking Tech. Number 2. Choosing a black-and-white film and developer combination to complement subject conditions and image qualities.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1978 (v.6#10) pg. 40

Tips on processing 35mm film to avoid exaggerated grain.
PHOTOGRAPHIC May 1978 (v.7#1) pg. 114

Extended development. An excerpt of material from the book INCREASING FILM SPEED. Extended development is the simplest push-processing technique.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Aug 1978 (v.7#4) pg. 89

Tip on processing your own black-and-white film using Kodak's D-76 developer.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Nov 1979 (v.8#7) pg. 20

Basic darkroom. Developing your first roll of film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jan 1980 (v.8#9) pg. 47

Test to determine the apparant print graininess from various combinations of b&w film and developers. Test of Ilford's Pan F, FP4, and HP5 films is described.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jan 1980 (v.8#9) pg. 82

Tip: How to process Kodak 2475 Recording film or Tri-X film in order to get deliberate grain.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Mar 1980 (v.8#11) pg. 91

Results of tests which attempt to exact the best image quality possible from slow-speed, fine-grain black-and-white films. Test involves five different developers used on Kodak Panatomic-X film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Apr 1980 (v.8#12) pg. 98

A complete rundown on Kodak Technical Pan Film 2415, including various developer specifications, filter factors, and tips on using and processing this film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jun 1980 (v.9#2) pg. 52

Basic darkroom. Troubleshooting problems in your negative and print.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Sep 1980 (v.9#5) pg. 69

Using the Phillips Testing Kit #1 and other tips to help guarantee that you are processing archival-quality black-and-white film and prints.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Dec 1981 (v.10#8) pg. 9

Tips on the proper techniques for processing your b&w film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Sep 1982 (v.11#5) pg. 18

How to get the sharpest, finest-grain pictorial results in 35mm, easily and consistently by using Kodak Tech Pan film and Technidol LC low-contrast developer.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1983 (v.11#10) pg. 36

How to achieve large-format quality from 35mm Tri-X negatives by processing in more dilute HC-110 and careful printing.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1983 (v.11#10) pg. 64

Make the most of available light. Achieve fine-grain quality while pushing ASA 400 film up to an E.I. of 3200. Processing time and chemicals for E.I. of 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 are given.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Apr 1983 (v.11#12) pg. 76

How to push-process Tri-X film in paper developer.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Sep 1983 (v.12#5) pg. 66

Perfect negatives. Part 1. How to determine your own precise film speeds and developing times.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Nov 1983 (v.12#7) pg. 102

Perfect negatives. Part 2. Determining precise developing times.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Dec 1983 (v.12#8) pg. 35

Perfect negatives. Part 3. Fine tuning through print evaluation.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jan 1984 (v.12#9) pg. 14

Perfect negatives. Part 4. Analyzing your results.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1984 (v.12#10) pg. 27

Perfect negatives. Part 5. Conclusion: The final details.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Mar 1984 (v.12#11) pg. 76

Using "extended range" film development to control high contrast subjects.
PHOTOGRAPHIC May 1984 (v.13#1) pg. 28

Ten tips to make life easier in the darkroom.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Sep 1984 (v.13#5) pg. 78

The perfect match. Choosing the right developer, black-and-white film, and subject to give perfect prints every time. Some tips.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1985 (v.13#10) pg. 30

How to establish a valid working film speed index for any black-and-white film and developer combination.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Apr 1985 (v.13#12) pg. 76

Tips on processing Kodak 120 Technical Pan Film in Technidol liquid developer.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Jul 1985 (v.14#3) pg. 34

SPECIAL SECTION on 35mm single-lens reflex photography. Processing and printing 35mm black-and-white film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Dec 1985 (v.14#8) pg. A (40+)

How to process Tri-X film exposed at EI 16,000.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Feb 1987 (v.15#10) pg. 78

Processing options for Kodak's T-Max film.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Dec 1987 (v.16#8) pg. 44

Hot T-Max. How to process T-Max film at various temperatures (68-, 75- and 100-degrees F.). Times for both negative and direct positive processes are included.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Aug 1990 (v.19#4) pg. 40

How to blast grain. Reticulating (cracking) Kodak 2475 recording film to produce an even grainier effect.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Nov 1990 (v.19#7) pg. 42

Darkroom basics. A special section on black-and-white. (1) Developing film. (2) Making a contact proof sheet. (3) Making enlargements. (4) Multiple-printing tricks.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Oct 1992 (v.21#6) pg. 57

Special section on achieving good black-and-white photos. (1) Making good negatives through proper exposure and proper development. (2) Understanding your camera's light meter. (3) Developing film. (4) Making a contact proof sheet. (5) Making enlargements.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Oct 1993 (v.22#6) pg. 58

Small-batch processing for consistency. Tips on controlling the variables of water quality, solution strength, temperature, agitation and time to produce exceptional b&w negatives.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Aug 1994 (v.23#4) pg. 76

School of photography. Part 6. Basic black-and-white darkroom techniques.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Oct 1994 (v.23#6) pg. 63

Darkroom basics. Step-by-step black-and-white film developing.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Oct 1998 (v.27#6) pg. 32

Darkroom basics. How to fine-tune your black-and-white film developing.
PHOTOGRAPHIC Nov 1998 (v.27#7) pg. 16

How to test a film and developer combination for their best possible working conditions.
PHOTOMETHODS Sep 1977 (v.20#9) pg. 35

Chromogenic development of litho film. Part 1. How to mix and use chemicals to add color to litho film by means of color couplers.
PHOTOMETHODS May 1981 (v.24#5) pg. 16

Chromogenic development of litho film. Part 2.
PHOTOMETHODS Jun 1981 (v.24#6) pg. 25

Chromogenic development of litho film. Part 3.
PHOTOMETHODS Sep 1981 (v.24#9) pg. 12

Using and processing Kodak Technical Pan film to get 35mm negatives suitable for large prints.
PHOTOMETHODS Apr 1983 (v.26#4) pg. 33

Techniques for processing Kodak Technical Pan 2415 35mm film.
PHOTOMETHODS Aug 1985 (v.28#8) pg. 8
Added Info PHOTOMETHODS Sep 1985 (v.28#9) pg. 13

Tests of Kodak's Technical Pan films and Technidol developers.
PHOTOMETHODS Oct 1985 (v.28#10) pg. 25

Ilford XP1 film. A user test of this b&w variable-speed chromogenic film. Includes push process times for EI 800, 1600, and 3200.
PHOTOMETHODS Feb 1987 (v.30#2) pg. 10

User test of Kodak T-MAX P3200 film. Results of exposure tests at E.I. 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25000 and 50000. Includes time/temperature charts for small-tank and rotary-tube processing.
PHOTOMETHODS Jun 1988 (v.31#6) pg. 24

Processing Kodak T-MAX black and white films. Tips for conventional tank processing, rotary-tube processing, chemical replenishment and general process characteristics.
PHOTOMETHODS Jan 1989 (v.32#1) pg. 39

Using the Kodak T-MAX 100 Direct Positive Film Developing Kit to produce black and white slides. Includes small tank developing time chart adjusted for multiple roll processing.
PHOTOMETHODS Aug 1989 (v.32#8) pg. 28

Fifteen darkroom errors that spoil negatives or prints and how to avoid them.
POPULAR MECHANICS Feb 1968 (v.129#2) pg. 144

Tip: How to expose and develop a single 35mm frame without wasting an entire roll of film.
POPULAR MECHANICS Jan 1984 (v.161#1) pg. 54

Testing films and prints for residual hypo.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1967 (v.60#1) pg. 54

For proper developing of Kodak Tri-X film in Acufine developer, temperature control is very important.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jul 1967 (v.61#1) pg. 63

How to process under pressure. From exposed film to dry print in 16 minutes.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1968 (v.63#5) pg. 136

How to develop negatives by inspection so that single shots can be over- or under-developed before fixing.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Dec 1968 (v.63#6) pg. 142

Monobath developing of film. An explanation of the process and its benefits.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1969 (v.64#2) pg. 68

Tips to avoid over agitating while developing film.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1969 (v.65#5) pg. 72

Tape recorded instructions assist you in a darkroom activity, like film processing.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1971 (v.68#1) pg. 47

Developing film without a darkroom.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1971 (v.68#6) pg. 86

How to control and use grain size to achieve a desired effect.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1972 (v.70#3) pg. 69

A connoisseur's darkroom guide. Tricks that lead to quality film and prints.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1972 (v.70#3) pg. 76

Setting a standard all your own. Determining the correct development time for your own work, regardless of the data sheet recommendations.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Apr 1972 (v.70#4) pg. 61

How to get the finest grain possible from Kodak Tri-X film.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY May 1972 (v.70#5) pg. 28

Tips on coping with high contrast negatives when exposure must be made in bright sunlight, harsh contrast situations. Chemical reduction, deliberate overexposure/underdevelopment and changing paper grades discussed.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1972 (v.71#3) pg. 18

Acufine revisited. Using Acufine to process Tri-X film exposed at E.I. 1200.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Dec 1974 (v.75#6) pg. 42

How to turn your kid on to photography. Project 5. How to process the photograph made with the pinhole camera constructed in project 4.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1975 (v.77#5) pg. 125

Five ways to better negatives from high-contrast scenes. How to reduce contrast in your black & white negatives so they'll make the best possible prints.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Dec 1975 (v.77#6) pg. 102

How to turn your kid on to photography. Project 7. Film development.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1976 (v.78#1) pg. 125

The Hattersley Class for beginners. How to develop your first roll of film and get top-quality negatives.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1976 (v.78#2) pg. 82

How to boost the exposure index of film by using a hydrogen peroxide treatment.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1976 (v.78#3) pg. 32

How to get fine-grain negatives from fast film using Rodinal developer and sodium sulfite.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY May 1976 (v.78#5) pg. 22

Process Panatomic-X in Agfa's Rodinal to improve the range of tones available.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1976 (v.79#2) pg. 32

Use high-speed films for daylight shooting by combining them with accurate exposures and soft-working developers to produce fine grain, good gradation and sharpness.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1976 (v.79#4) pg. 114

David Vestal's photo workbook. Handout 4. Film processing in general.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1977 (v.80#6) pg. 80

David Vestal's photo workbook. Handout 5. Step-by-step black and white film developing.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jul 1977 (v.81#1) pg. 83

The pleasures of high-speed black & white films. Tips on exposing and developing ASA 400 films like Kodak Tri-X and Ilford HP5.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1977 (v.81#2) pg. 92

The Hattersley class for beginners. How to process your first roll of black-and-white film. Description of a virtually "foolproof" procedure.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1979 (v.85#3) pg. 112

Tri-X at 1600 in bright sunlight will result in poster-like quality by means of exagerated exposure and development.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Feb 1980 (v.86#2) pg. 88

Tips designed to prevent photograpic "goofs". Tips include: (1) Marking developing tanks with film contents. (2) Traction-relief devices to keep PC synch cord from pulling out, etc.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Apr 1980 (v.86#4) pg. 82

The Hattersley Class for Beginners. Six ways to control contrast. How to do it before, during, and after you shoot the picture. Choice of paper and film, film development, lighting, print flashing, etc. are all methods to control contrast.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1980 (v.86#6) pg. 102

The zone system revisited. Part 2. How to fine tune film developing for high or low contrast subjects.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Dec 1981 (v.88#12) pg. 96

Tip: How to develop Kodak b&w film in Kodak HC-110 general-purpose developer.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Mar 1982 (v.89#3) pg. 77

Simple secrets of the darkroom. Superb b&w film processing requires a little equipment, a lot of concentration, and some professional expertise.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1982 (v.89#9) pg. 102

Beating that old-devil contrast. An understanding of the relationship between exposure and development is the key to black-and-white contrast control.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1983 (v.90#10) pg. 85

Clip-out photo tips. Includes tips on traveling with a camera, camera maintenance, film exposure, push-processing, and darkroom tips.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1986 (v.93#1) pg. 67

Black-and-white photofinishing is now reemerging. How to choose a lab that will do justice to your images.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1987 (v.94#9) pg. 62

Goof-proof your black-and-white film processing. Part 1.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1987 (v.94#10) pg. 42

Push processing primer. What to do when you need more speed than your film's ISO rating allows. Tips for color slide, color negative, and b&w film.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1987 (v.94#10) pg. 66

Goof-proof your black-and-white film processing. Part 2.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Nov 1987 (v.94#11) pg. 104

Tip: Adjust film development times to control highlights in intentionally overexposed negatives.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jan 1989 (v.96#1) pg. 8

How to inspect negatives during development. Techniques to save problem exposures.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1989 (v.96#8) pg. 38

Tips on sending unprocessed film through the mail.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1990 (v.97#8) pg. 8
Added Info POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Oct 1990 (v.97#10) pg. 33

Tip on identifying and protecting any film cartridge which you send through the mail.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1990 (v.97#8) pg. 102

Proposal for a universal standard for commercial black-and-white film processing.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Sep 1991 (v.98#9) pg. 26

Tip on saving on postage costs when sending multiple rolls using prepaid mailers.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Jun 1993 (v.57#2) pg. 116

Reticulation. What causes reticulation during film processing. How to either avoid the problem or induce creative reticulation.
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY Aug 1994 (v.58#8) pg. 112

Finding a quality black-and-white processing lab. Some tips.
RANGEFINDER Jul 1994 (v.43#7) pg. 52

Two-solution film developing techniques and formulas.
SHUTTERBUG #259 Apr 1992 (v.21#6) pg. 74

Processing film with Kodak's D-76 developer. A step-by-step guide for both roll and sheet film.
SHUTTERBUG #265 Oct 1992 (v.21#12) pg. 82

Tip on processing an old, tightly-wound roll of film.
SHUTTERBUG #283 Apr 1994 (v.23#6) pg. 212

Fundamental darkroom procedures. Tips on film processing looks at chemistry, cleanliness, procedures, etc.
SHUTTERBUG #294 Mar 1995 (v.24#5) pg. 124

Developing dilemmas. Tips for processing unfamiliar b&w films.
SHUTTERBUG #307 Apr 1996 (v.25#6) pg. 82

Don't toss that old roll. Advice on processing old and obsolete film.
SHUTTERBUG #321 Jun 1997 (v.26#8) pg. 98

Four variables of black and white film processing. Advice on controlling time, temperature, agitation and solution strength to get the best possible results.
SHUTTERBUG #321 Jun 1997 (v.26#8) pg. 228

Controlling b&w negative contrast. How time, temperature and choice of printing paper will impact film processing.
SHUTTERBUG #325 Oct 1997 (v.26#12) pg. 90

Simple is better. Sheet film processing techniques.
SHUTTERBUG #325 Oct 1997 (v.26#12) pg. 204

Developing, handling and filing medium format rollfilm images.
SHUTTERBUG #328 Jan 1998 (v.27#3) pg. 96

Invisible light. Determining developing times for B&W infrared film.
SHUTTERBUG #330 Mar 1998 (v.27#5) pg. 40

Five developing tips when processing 4"x5" b&w sheet film.
SHUTTERBUG #330 Mar 1998 (v.27#5) pg. 126

Consumer's guide to photo processing. Finding a quality film lab.
SHUTTERBUG #333 Jun 1998 (v.27#8) pg. 72

Grain. How to improve B&W grain control by understanding films and developers.
SHUTTERBUG #333 Jun 1998 (v.27#8) pg. 238

Processing your first roll of black-and-white film. Some tips.
SHUTTERBUG #345 Jun 1999 (v.28#8) pg. 230

Learn the curve. Working with compensating film developers.
SHUTTERBUG #349 Oct 1999 (v.28#12) pg. 92