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READ-ONLY MEMORY entries in Index to How To Do It Information
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Detailed entries for one subject from the INDEX TO HOW TO DO IT INFORMATION.
Click on a see also (sa) or tracing (xx) to view detailed entries about a related subject.
The entries are in alphabetical order by magazine name and then in chronological sequence.
To obtain a copy of any magazine article contact your local public library or the publisher.

READ-ONLY MEMORY
x   COMPUTER MEMORY (ROM)
x   EPROM (ERASABLE PROGRAMMABLE READ-ONLY MEMORY)
x   ERASABLE PROGRAMMABLE READ-ONLY MEMORY (EPROM)
x   MEMORY (READ-ONLY)
x   PROGRAMMABLE READ-ONLY MEMORY (PROM)
x   PROM (PROGRAMMABLE READ-ONLY MEMORY)
x   ROM
xx   COMPUTER INPUT & OUTPUT
xx   DIGITAL ELECTRONICS
xx   RANDOM-ACCESS MEMORY

Design for a 32 byte PROM board that holds the bootstraps for Altair Extended BASIC or regular BASIC.
BYTE Jan 1977 (v.2#1) pg. 50

Inexpensive device to erase EROM's uses a coffee can, a couple of light bulb fixtures, a switch, and an ultraviolet lamp.
BYTE Jan 1977 (v.2#1) pg. 91

Program your next EROM in BASIC. Schematic for a 2708 erasable read only memory reader and programmer which uses parallel IO ports to set data and address. The software to drive the programmer is written in BASIC. Est. cost: $9.
BYTE Mar 1978 (v.3#3) pg. 84
Correction BYTE Apr 1978 (v.3#4) pg. 62

Simple circuit for an 8080 based system which allows programmable memory to reside at location 0 while still allowing a ROM bootstrap permanently in memory. This circuit allows an immediate software jump to some memory location other than 0 whenever "reset" is activated.
BYTE Mar 1978 (v.3#3) pg. 185
Added Info BYTE Jun 1978 (v.3#6) pg. 99

Zapper, a computer driven EROM programmer. Data is sent to this programmer board via a peripheral interface adapter (PIA).
BYTE Dec 1978 (v.3#12) pg. 100
Correction BYTE Feb 1979 (v.4#2) pg. 43

Add nonvolatile memory to your computer by means of "electrically alterable read-only memory" (EAROM).
BYTE Dec 1979 (v.4#12) pg. 36

How to program 2708 EPROM's using this circuit board and program.
BYTE Apr 1980 (v.5#4) pg. 198
Added Info BYTE Sep 1980 (v.5#9) pg. 321

Build a low-cost EPROM eraser.
BYTE Apr 1980 (v.5#4) pg. 234
Correction BYTE Jul 1980 (v.5#7) pg. 228

Tips on circuits for PROM programmers.
BYTE Jul 1981 (v.6#7) pg. 210

Build an intelligent type-2716 EPROM programmer. Consists of the Z8-BASIC microcomputer, EPROM-programming interface and a video-display terminal.
BYTE Oct 1981 (v.6#10) pg. 36

Schematic for configuring an external 2 K-byte EPROM which can be accessed by the TRS-80 Model I within the address range of 3000-3BFF.
BYTE Oct 1981 (v.6#10) pg. 318

COSMAC EPROM programmer. How to build a low-cost EPROM programmer based on an RCA 1802 microprocessor. Est. cost: $130.
BYTE Jan 1982 (v.7#1) pg. 344

Build an EPROM emulator dual-port memory circuit which allows you to develop and test EPROM programs before actually "burning in" the EPROM.
BYTE Feb 1982 (v.7#2) pg. 194

Replace EPROMs (erasable PROMs) with the 2817 EEPROM (electrically erasable PROM). Includes circuits and software for using and programming. Est. cost: $110.
BYTE Jul 1983 (v.8#7) pg. 460

A low-cost, low write-voltage EEPROM. Seeg Technology's $10 EEPROM can be programmed in your computer with simple and inexpensive circuitry.
BYTE Feb 1984 (v.9#2) pg. 343

An EPROM simulator. A battery-powered RAM that can be unplugged from one socket and plugged into another without risk to chips or loss of data.
BYTE Mar 1984 (v.9#3) pg. 400

How to use a 2716 EPROM programmer to program 2732 EPROMs as two separate 2K-byte segments.
BYTE May 1984 (v.9#5) pg. 495

A parallel-port EPROM programmer. Lets you program 2764 through 27512 EPROMs and other devices. Part 1. Construction.
COMPUTERCRAFT Jun 1991 (v.1#3) pg. 56

Using nonvolatile memory ICs.
COMPUTERCRAFT Jul 1991 (v.1#4) pg. 34

A parallel-port EPROM programmer. Part 2. Voltage checks and putting the programmer into use.
COMPUTERCRAFT Jul 1991 (v.1#4) pg. 48

EPROM programming. Tools and techniques for programming EPROMs used with dedicated and embedded computers.
COMPUTERCRAFT Oct 1991 (v.1#7) pg. 40

A computer-controlled RS-232 serial-driven EPROM programmer designed primarily for the 2764, 27128, and 27256 devices.
COMPUTERCRAFT Jul 1992 (v.2#7) pg. 14

Microcontroller EPROM programming. Easy and economical programming options for single-chip computers and microcontrollers.
COMPUTERCRAFT Aug 1992 (v.2#8) pg. 24

How to use flash EPROMs in your own circuits. What they are, how they work, how they're positioned in the nonvolatile memory family, important details on their use, etc.
COMPUTERCRAFT Mar 1993 (v.3#3) pg. 32

A simple Intel BASIC-52 extractor. Copies an internal 8052AH-BASIC interpreter into EPROM for use with inexpensive 8032 and 8052 microprocessors.
COMPUTERCRAFT Aug 1993 (v.3#8) pg. 53

Guide to EPROMs. A comparison of features and a reference to device pinouts for testing and troubleshooting. Looks at 24-pin, 28-pin, 32-pin and 40-pin EPROMs.
COMPUTERCRAFT Nov 1993 (v.3#11) pg. 43

An economy EPROM programmer constructed with off-the-shelf components uses a serial connection to your computer to transfer data at 9,600 baud.
COMPUTERCRAFT Dec 1993 (v.3#12) pg. 27

Guide to SRAMs, NVRAMs, EEPROMs, Flash Memory, and SmartSockets. A comparison of features and a reference to device pinouts for testing and troubleshooting.
COMPUTERCRAFT Dec 1993 (v.3#12) pg. 43

How to PEEK into a ROM cartridge. Here is a simple technique for listing the contents of VIC-20 plug-in programs.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Oct 1983 (v.21#10) pg. 52

How to add EEPROM's (electrically erasable PROMS) to a TRS-80.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Oct 1983 (v.21#10) pg. 88

Customize your Apple computer with an EPROM plug. Here's a simple way to change the standard ROMs in your Apple II.
COMPUTERS & ELECTRONICS Nov 1983 (v.21#11) pg. 58

Motorola 68705 microcontroller. (1) How to build a single-IC microprocessor system using the Motorola MC68705P3 microcomputer on a chip. (2) Build a programmer for burning software into the 68705's internal EPROM. (3) Digital alarm clock project built around the 68705 IC.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1991 pg. 83

Semiconductor memories. An overview of today's revolutionary memory technology (ROM, PROM, EPROM, EEPROM, static RAM, dynamic RAM, MOS technology, etc.). Includes an EPROM emulator circuit.
ELECTRONICS EXPERIMENTERS HANDBOOK 1993 pg. 42

Static ROM. Build an EPROM emulator which is an alternative to expensive microcontroller emulation systems. Use in combination with an assembled 8048 board as a learning tool or microcontroller debugging tool.
ELECTRONICS NOW Dec 1993 (v.64#12) pg. 66
Added Info ELECTRONICS NOW Mar 1994 (v.65#3) pg. 18 (28-pin headers)

PC I/O breadboard. Part 3. Build a sophisticated EPROM programmer on your breadboard.
ELECTRONICS NOW Aug 1994 (v.65#8) pg. 59

Low-cost EEPROM programmer is operated via the COM1 port on your PC. Est. cost: $40.
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1995 (v.66#11) pg. 37

Five easy EEPROM projects to put your EEPROM programmer to work. All of the projects are variations of LED flasher circuits.
ELECTRONICS NOW Nov 1995 (v.66#11) pg. 39

Build a 2764 EPROM emulator for an IBM PC. The project uses static RAM on an IBM PC plug-in card to emulate the 2764.
ELECTRONICS NOW Feb 1996 (v.67#2) pg. 39

Solid-state memory devices. Basic differences between various types of semi-conductor memory devices (RAM, ROM, EPROM).
HANDS-ON ELECTRONICS Jun 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 44

Build a quicker EPROM eraser. A simple unit using a germicidal UV lamp gives full erasure of EPROMs in 15 to 20 minutes. Est. cost: $25. Also describes the theory of EPROMs and gives a PROM burner program written for the Cromemco Byte Saver board.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #15 Mar 1978 pg. 90

Simple and low-cost PROM programmer for a 6800 based system. The programmer operates under software control. Requires two parallel eight-bit ports and an additional two I/O bits for some control signals. Software is provided for a 6800 system, but can be adapted for other systems. Est. cost: $25.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #19 Jul 1978 pg. 94

Kilobaud Klassroom No. 12. ROM and RAM memories.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #21 Sep 1978 pg. 84

Easy to build programmer for programming your own 2708 PROM's. Includes software for use with a KIM microcomputer. Est. cost: $51 (Kit).
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #21 Sep 1978 pg. 100
Added Info KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #28 Apr 1979 pg. 19

EPROM programmer board can be built for a 6502 system for as little as $5. Use it to program the Intel 2758 erasable programmable read only memory.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #27 Mar 1979 pg. 46
Added Info KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #32 Aug 1979 pg. 22 (For use on 8080 or Z80).

Some thoughts on the SWTP computer system. Part 1. Using ultraviolet light to erase EPROMS, correcting power supply problems, information on the 32K memory board, a fix so the RESET signal always gets through, increasing the baud rate, and a description of the new motherboard.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #27 Mar 1979 pg. 60

2708 EPROM for the S-100. Design and construction of a versatile EPROM board for the S-100 bus.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #33 Sep 1979 pg. 78

Sweetening the Cromemco Bytesaver. Add a front-panel ROM programming station connected to the Bytesaver by a ribbon cable. Eliminate the need to power down the system to change ROMs.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #34 Oct 1979 pg. 176

Add an inexpensive EPROM board to an SWTP computer. Modify a bare 4K RAM board.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #36 Dec 1979 pg. 62
Correction KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #37 Jan 1980 pg. 170

Convert the "Giant Board" and 4K memory board for an ELF II computer into an EPROM programmer. Requires the addition of only a few inexpensive IC's, transistors, and resistors.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #38 Feb 1980 pg. 76

Thoughts on the SWTP computer system. Part 9. Disk systems, debugging, and EPROM conversions.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #38 Feb 1980 pg. 82

Add up to 2K bytes of programmable memory to your Motorola MEK6800-D2 kit with this simple 2708 EPROM programmer. Fits right on the D2 circuit board. Estimated cost: $7.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #38 Feb 1980 pg. 138

Design for implementing in-circuit programming of the 2716 EPROM using the COSMAC 1802 microprocessor system.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #39 Mar 1980 pg. 146

Modification lets you plug less expensive Texas Instrument 2716 EPROM's into the SWTP MP-A2 microprocessor board.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #39 Mar 1980 pg. 156

A use for misprogrammed PROMs. Two of them will provide "Chip Enables" (CEs) for 16K of address space in 1K increments.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #43 Jul 1980 pg. 98

Kilobaud klassroom. Part 20. (1) EPROM programming. (2) Troubleshooting a defective computer system.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #45 Sep 1980 pg. 78

Instant no-disk program loading. Technique for SWTP 6800 system moves large programs (such as the BASIC interpreter) from EPROM to RAM and automatically starts execution.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #45 Sep 1980 pg. 120

PROM adapter for the SWTP 6800 computer. Allows an Intel 2716 to be connected to the socket normally reserved for a Motorola 6830 ROM. Allows the use of custom monitors resident in EPROM.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #45 Sep 1980 pg. 162

Build an EPROM board for your RCA 1802 microprocessor (such as the Elf II computer).
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #47 Nov 1980 pg. 154

Tip: How to keep both the Auto-Start ROM and the old monitor ROM in the same Apple II computer.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #48 Dec 1980 pg. 214

Thoughts on the 68XX system. Notes on real-time clocks, video boards and EPROMS.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #51 Mar 1981 (v.5#3) pg. 94

Programmer for the 2716 EPROM (Intel version) uses an 1802 microprocessor.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #53 May 1981 (v.5#5) pg. 212

Tips on assembling and using the John Bell Engineering 2716 EPROM programmer.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #55 Jul 1981 (v.5#7) pg. 162

How to convert an early model TRS-80 with two Level I ROMs into a Level III machine.
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #55 Jul 1981 (v.5#7) pg. 195

Quick and easy hardware modification for the Cromemco Bytesaver II allows you to select how much memory it will occupy (8K or 1K).
KILOBAUD MICROCOMPUTING #60 Dec 1981 (v.5#12) pg. 174

Easy-to-use, inexpensive data loader circuit requires no memory space and plugs directly into your S-100 computer. Lets you load ROM or EPROM-based programs without removing the cover of the computer.
MICROCOMPUTING Aug 1982 (v.6#8) pg. 54

The switcher, a simple add-on that changes PET/CBM character sets at the flick of a switch. No cutting or soldering on the computer is required.
MICROCOMPUTING #74 Feb 1983 (v.7#2) pg. 68

The intelligent toaster. Experiments in computer control. Before you build computer-controlled devices, you need to understand single-chip intelligence. EPROMs.
MICROCOMPUTING #75 Mar 1983 (v.7#3) pg. 92

The intelligent toaster. Experiments in computer control. Single-chip intelligence. How to program the 8748 EPROM.
MICROCOMPUTING #77 May 1983 (v.7#5) pg. 48

Build a PROM programmer which uses an RS-232C serial I/O port.
MICROCOMPUTING Jul 1984 (v.8#7) pg. 106

A description of RAM, ROM and PROM memories for computers.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [1] Dec 1978 (v.1#9) pg. 10

Circuit design from scratch. A hands-on approach to creating new circuits. Project No. 3. A practical EPROM tester.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1985 (v.1#7) pg. 66

Power supply for an EPROM burner. Circuit for a switching dc-to-dc converter to boost +5-volt input up to +12, +21, or +24 volts. Est. cost: $5.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jul 1985 (v.2#1) pg. 70

EPROMS. How they work, plus tips on reading and programming.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1986 (v.3#2) pg. 79

An EPROM programmer for the Commodore 64. Computer-driven plug-in board programs 2764 EPROMs. Est. cost: $34.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1986 (v.3#11) pg. 52
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Apr 1987 (v.4#4) pg. 91
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Aug 1987 (v.4#8) pg. 5

EPROM eraser. Est. cost: $6.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Nov 1986 (v.3#11) pg. 80

Stand-alone EPROM programmer. Read a program or copy programs from one EPROM to another with this programmer that can be upgraded to accommodate new EPROMs as they become available. Part 1.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Feb 1987 (v.4#2) pg. 50
Correction MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 5

Stand-alone EPROM programmer. Part 2. Retrofit module plugs into the basic unit to allow programming of 64K and 128K EPROMs.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1987 (v.4#3) pg. 44

EPROM eraser. How to build an ultraviolet EPROM eraser for a fraction of the cost of a commercial unit.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] May 1987 (v.4#5) pg. 40

How to use EPROMs for non-memory applications. Creating complex digital logic circuits with EPROMs simplifies electronic designing. Circuits include (1) keyboard translator, (2) keyboard-controller and (3) stepper-motor controller.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Jun 1987 (v.4#6) pg. 28

An EPROM speed reader/comparator. Checks 16K to 512K EPROMs for complete erasure and compares a copy with an original EPROM in just seconds.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Mar 1988 (v.5#3) pg. 18

A stand-alone PROM burner lets you manually program the 54/74S472 PROM for applications that do not require massive non-volatile data storage.
MODERN ELECTRONICS [2] Oct 1990 (v.7#10) pg. 17

How to program read-only memories.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1975 (v.8#1) pg. 27

Programmable read-only memories (PROM's). What they are, how they work, and how to program them.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Nov 1977 (v.12#5) pg. 77

Low-cost EPROM programmer. Part 1. Device to program erasable read-only memories of the 256-word-by-8-bit type (1702A, 4702A and 8702A EPROM's). Programmer is a write-only machine. Address and data may be input via switches or directly from a computer via TTL input option. Est. cost: $80.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1978 (v.13#2) pg. 41

Low-cost EPROM programmer. Part 2. Power supply, construction and checkout.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Mar 1978 (v.13#3) pg. 55

EPROM programmer for 6800-based computers. Used to program the 1K-by-8-bit 2708 EPROM. Computer program is available upon request.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1980 (v.18#2) pg. 61

Hardware and software to program, copy, and verify data in a 2708 EPROM, using an 1802 microprocessor.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jun 1981 (v.19#6) pg. 68

Designing with the 8080 microprocessor. Part 6. Conclusion. Programming the CPU module's ROM to operate the morse code receiver interface.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Feb 1982 (v.20#2) pg. 69

Programming EPROM's with a small computer. Part 1. How to build a hardware-software system interface for programming from keyboard, cassette or disk.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Jul 1982 (v.20#7) pg. 61

Programming EPROM's with a small computer. Part 2. Constructing the circuit.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [1] Aug 1982 (v.20#8) pg. 67

Create your own IC's. Build the IC Designer, a device to configure PEEL (Programmable Electrically Erasable Logic) integrated circuits which contain an embedded EEPROM. Est. cost: $80.
POPULAR ELECTRONICS [2] Jan 1990 (v.7#1) pg. 33

Making PROM's work for you. What are PROMs and how they work.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1978 (v.49#12) pg. 43

PROM programming. The key to using a PROM is the ability to program it.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1979 (v.50#9) pg. 68

Build this inexpensive PROM programmer to program the 74S-series of PROMs.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1981 (v.52#2) pg. 74

Build this PROM programmer for use with 2K 2716 EPROMs. Hexadecimal code is entered via two thumbwheel switches and pressing the "Program" button.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1982 (v.53#2) pg. 45
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1982 (v.53#8) pg. 22

Build this computer controlled IC tester. Part 3. Add an EPROM programmer.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1984 (v.55#11) pg. 65

Machine code development system. Turn your Timex Sinclair 1000 into a machine-code development system, EPROM programmer, and EPROM emulator. Part 1.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1985 (v.56#1) pg. 7 (ComputerDigest)

Machine code development system. Turn your Timex Sinclair 1000 into a machine-code development system, EPROM programmer, and EPROM emulator. Part 2.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1985 (v.56#3) pg. 13 (ComputerDigest)

Buffer/converter for your printer. A 64K printer buffer that is also a parallel-to-serial and serial-to-parallel converter. May also be expanded to program EPROMs. Part 1.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Aug 1985 (v.56#8) pg. 59, 75, 77
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1985 (v.56#9) pg. 16
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Dec 1985 (v.56#12) pg. 22

Buffer/converter for your printer. Part 2. Using and adding the EPROM programmer assembly.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1985 (v.56#9) pg. 78, 83, 84

Firmware card. Add this simple card to your Timex-Sinclair 1000 computer and you won't have to store everything above RAMTOP. This device lets you place either a 2K or 4K EPROM anywhere in the USR memory area. It can serve as an interface card for custom projects.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1985 (v.56#11) pg. 4 (ComputerDigest)

EPROM programmer. Can burn all the popular 5-volt EPROM's in both 24- and 28-pin packages including EEPROM's. The programmer is a stand-alone unit which does not require a computer or ASCII display terminal. I/O lines can be used to automate control of all functions. Est. cost: $60. Part 1.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1986 (v.57#10) pg. 61, 76

EPROM programmer. Part 2. Modes of operation.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Nov 1986 (v.57#11) pg. 55, 65, 67

Non-volatile memory IC's. A look at EPROM, EEPROM, and the new NOVRAM technology.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1987 (v.58#10) pg. 60

Programmable logic devices (PLDs). How the new reconfigurable logic devices will revolutionize the design of logic systems. Looks at PLD's, PROM's, EPROM's, EEPROM's, PLA's, FPLA's, and PAL's. Part 1. History of programmable logic.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1988 (v.59#2) pg. 59

Programmable logic devices (PLDs). Part 2. PLD's and programming devices available at hobbyist prices.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1988 (v.59#3) pg. 63

Custom EPROM decoders. Introduction to techniques for reducing the number of decoder, demultiplexer and selector IC's required in a complex digital circuit.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1989 (v.60#1) pg. 80

68705 microcontroller. Part 1. Building a low-cost EPROM programmer for this single-chip Motorola microcontroller. Also looks at its architecture, registers, and programming considerations.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Sep 1989 (v.60#9) pg. 82
Added Info RADIO-ELECTRONICS Jan 1990 (v.61#1) pg. 79

68705 microcontroller. Part 2. Build a programmable alarm clock.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Oct 1989 (v.60#10) pg. 83

Tips on utilization of the spare EPROM socket found on many IBM XT motherboard clones.
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Feb 1990 (v.61#2) pg. 8

Semiconductor memories. An overview of memory technology (ROM, PROM, EPROM, EEPROM, static RAM, dynamic RAM, etc.).
RADIO-ELECTRONICS Mar 1991 (v.62#3) pg. 68